Uncommon Courage

The Know Show – theme: being our most authentic selves, with Cathy Johnson

October 22, 2021 Andrea T Edwards, Tim Wade, Joe Augustin, Cathy Johnson, Episode 21
Uncommon Courage
The Know Show – theme: being our most authentic selves, with Cathy Johnson
Show Notes Transcript

Welcome to The Know Show. Every week, Andrea T Edwards, Tim Wade and Joe Augustin review the news that’s getting everyone’s attention, as well as perhaps what requires our attention. We’ll talk about what it means to us, the world and we hope to inspire great conversations on the news that matters to all of us. 

This week we’ll be joined by Cathy Johnson, the Authentic Leadership Coach, she’s a speaker, coach and facilitator, as well as a keen follower of the world’s news. Our theme this week is: being our most authentic selves and why it matters. We’re going to discuss why authenticity is so critical today and how it supports our ability to make decisions with integrity, as well as getting clear on what matters to us and the actions we take. 

The Know Show is based on Andrea T Edwards Weekend Reads, and covers the climate crisis, Covid 19, topical moments in the world, global politics, business, social issues and passion/humor/history. Join us. 

#TheKnowShow #UncommonCourage

Unknown:

All right, we're live. Welcome to the no show. My name is Andrea Edwards. And my name is Joe Gustin. And he feels that way because he is slightly out of focus. And this is Tim Wade, I might put my camera a little bit later, welcome to the no show everybody. It's great to be here on this wonderful day every year in a hotel room, is that right? I am, I'm just down south of Bhutan, having a few days off with the kids. Very nice holidays. Joe's in his his studio, and I am switching cameras rapidly at the moment. But we have a special guest with us today, I should probably introduce you to the spring. So this week, we're going to be joined by Kathy Johnson, the authentic leadership coach, does that mean she only quote coaches authentic leaders, we'll find out. She's a speaker, coach and facilitator as well as keen follower of the world's news, which is why she's here on the no show to help us all. Our theme this week is being our most authentic selves and why it matters. We'll discuss why authenticity is so critical today, and how it supports our ability to make decisions with integrity, as well as getting clear on what matters to us and the actions we take. Welcome, Kathy. Thank you, Tim. Thank you all. Great to be here. I'm not sure what else I will say about me, except I'm a coach and facilitator and a speaker. And I'm good friends with each of you three. So I'm really happy to be here. wonderful to have you here. She's a fabulous person, but also very interested in world affairs. And that's one of the reasons I absolutely had to have you on although it's hard getting any time in your diary when you're so busy. Yes, I am. But good, busy. Yeah. Alright, so if you want to comment and be so that we can see it, you've got to sign in and give stream yard permission. So coming in joining the conversation, but you want to get into the stuck into the news that struck a chord this week. Yeah. Well, the breaking news this morning that you guys may not have seen. Alec Baldwin has accidentally shot and killed as well as seriously hurt another actor, the producer, and the photographer in a movie set and it's with a stunt gun. So I terrible accident that just came out breaking news this morning. But the big news I think this week that sort of kicked the week off was the death of former US Secretary of State Colin Powell. I was surprisingly sad by that. Did you guys sort of feel that moment? That was definitely sad. Yeah. Yeah, I was I was immediately incensed by how it was weaponized by the group that I also kind of look into I'm following what the the anti vaxxers are doing. And they immediately hopped on that and turn that into something else. Well, that that's Yeah. I think you're very brave getting into an anti vaxxer group because they do tend to sort of get into you and take over you and yeah, it's a risk. But john roberts from Fox News tweeted the fact that colin powell died from a breakthrough COVID infection raises new concerns about how effective vaccines are long term, and a lady called Nina Gen covets replied. He also suffered from multiple myeloma, any reporting that mentions pals COVID-19 vaccination status, but not that his body was essentially unable to fight infections is not doing its due diligence. So that's that's that's been a pretty interesting series of events this week. I thought, yeah, I'm getting I'm getting really convinced a lot of these people who report in that way, don't really know what the truth is anyway, as in like, they really just, you know, look at what they've seen somewhere and report it and say it out without even checking somewhere else. Yeah, that's completely irresponsible. But let's let's continue with COVID. So I'm sure you've been noticing that in the UK COVID has now hit around the 50,000 infections today mark, significantly higher than the rest of Europe. So lots of conversations, should they move to plan B? Should they move to plan C, they're not mandating mouse. There's no vaccine part passports. And but the hospitalization and the critical patients are definitely lower if you compare the statistics at this time last year. And then on the other side, the World Health Organization have said that due to vaccine inequity, the pandemic will continue deep into 2022. So like when I think about what we've been talking about for weeks now, just reminding everyone, we're always two weeks behind COVID we're always you know, you've got to look at it in the big picture perspective. But, but Joe, I did notice that you you've been having a bit of fun on Facebook this week talking about COVID there was an Irish story that you shared, you want to you want to share a little bit about what you've been reading. Oh, well Okay, so the Irish story that I that I that I share was about how someone had taken data or at least taken a news story and kind of found a conclusion from that it was basically how this particular Irish county had a 97% rate of vaccination. And it also simultaneously one of the highest rates of infections rate of cases for COVID at the same time, and we just put that together and said, Absolutely, that proves that vaccines don't work. And in fact went on to say that it actually proves that vaccines weaken the immune system. That's why the vaccine that's why we the the, the rates have been so high. So I just I just got on that in terms of trying to try to help people feel like it's not as simple as that you're to go deeper, you can ask bigger questions, you're gonna find out why that's the case and what had happened. And I think that article that you shared with us as well about why why COVID cases are so high in the UK, at least it attempts to ask the question and answer the question why the case is so high in the UK is the kind of thing that people should be doing, they should be looking at something and going like, why is that the case? And then before they they share the conclusion that is, while baseless is essentially the way to describe it. Yeah. Hello, Kathy, have you been reading anything about private in the last week? Yeah, the usual stuff. And that article was very interesting. Also, just in highlighting some things that that, I don't know, great bringing some things together. Even though it's focused on the UK. I'm always watching a little more around COVID. In the US. One thing that happened is the US lowered Singapore's COVID rating from level three to level four, the worst level, because they're apparently in dire straits. A lot worse than the US apparently. So. I got I saw something about that. And it just infuriated me. Did anyone see the I know I'm saying the F word. But anyone see the Fox News version of that? Now? Why? So basically, they had some epidemic, some some super scientist, dude. Right, next, right down next to the moon, who would validate everything they say? And the host would ask him a direct question. And as soon as she fed him what she wanted, she cut him off. So he couldn't do the but effectively, it was like, you know, Singapore, who was the shining light, and now experiencing massive, you know, if flood of cases. And they were the ones that were saying we all need to get jabbed. And they're all wearing masks, and all the pictures were people wearing. And now they've got all these extra cases. So obviously, you know, obviously, that doesn't work. Well, the thing about that particular story is and what was frustrating about that is there is somewhere in there, there's a shade of truth in what is being said in the sense that what is being talked about is, is the need for herd immunity. And why Singapore is actually in some sense, it's COVID naive. So we were over vaccinated, but we've never been really exposed with the rate of infection, I think it's only 3% of our population so far has been exposed, you know, to COVID. So we don't have any natural immunity, what we have is a quiet vaccination based immunity. And the best kind of immunity is going to come when we are with a vaccination expose to the real thing, and then our body learns and goes, Okay, this is the this is how we deal with it. And then it builds up. That little bit of truth was what that that that expert was about. And I don't know why experts accept invitations by Fox, because maybe they they feel that they can do something about the truth. Because I know this guy didn't subscribe to what they were saying about it. And they put that's been put up put around all being being being shared around exactly that he's about to say, what the Prime Minister is saying because they they use a clip of lesean long talking about it and saying it's a flip flopping message. And really it's not he's about to explain why it's not but they cut him off because the narrative did fit. Yeah. So you criminally say all of that. Yeah, but that was pretty much that was that was it it was, you know, effectively. If the virus comes in and we're unvaccinated, we're all going to be in hospital and a bunch of people are going to die. If we all get vaccinated before the virus comes in, then it comes in, we're all going to get it but we're not going to go to hospital. We're not gonna die in the hospital. Yeah, and the hospitals can handle it. Even the better that your people are vaccinated and isn't better when you go to war that you've got weapons. Americans should know that better than anyone. So, you know, they're happy to be going to war without any weapons. And, and it's just like, and that's why I don't know how many people have data in America because of this thing. But, but it's a lot more than 700,000. Right? 778, nearly a million. So yeah, they pass around a day, they pass the 1918 pandemic. Just few weeks ago, we were talking about 70,000 versus what? 30? Something? Yeah, I still think Singapore's doing better than America. But do you guys feel? Do you feel that? You know, there was a lot of frustration with the government's recent handling of keeping people in lockdown? do you guys feel that they were right? So I'm going to do something that I really am not supposed to do? Because first of all, I am still a Malaysian, I have a family that's entirely Singaporean around me. And I'm not supposed to comment about things like this. But I'm going to say something. You know, the, the real problem is this particular government doesn't defend itself, it doesn't really want to spend the time on the rhetoric, it wants to do the work. And right now, with the situation, there was something very big happening that no one is going to try and touch and talk about because they won't say it. And this is just me, and this is just my opinion, based on the signs I understand and what i what i what i see going on. What we have is a controlled burden right now, you know, there was an article that came out in the papers, it was it was, it was a it was an opinion piece by one of the journalists. And this opinion was basically you know, are we are we paying too much too high a price by avoiding the inevitable by by going through all these, all these measures, right. And I gotta say that in my mind that the fact that this article was written this way, it dropped that journalists esteem in my mind, because the words that they came out of, and this can be the editor's choice, said, inevitable, are we just trying to avoid the inevitable. And the problem is, if anyone dies, I'm actually error, it's pretty morbid to say, so I'm okay. If anyone dies inevitably, from COVID-19. What I'm saying is that in the cost of the disease, if someone does die at this stage, after all the vaccination, and everything happens, it's inevitable. that's reasonable for me, what I am completely unable to handle and I think no one should be able to handle this if anyone dies, because it wasn't inevitable. If someone has COVID-19 and dies, because there's not enough oxygen, there's not enough beds, there's not enough people to look after this person that they could be saved. But because it got out of hand, it was not an inevitable death, but it just got out of hand. And that's the thing that we kind of had to work on. And it's I don't I don't know how people are able to, to look at it and go like, Oh, it's gonna happen, we might as well just have it happen right now. The point is, if you look at the numbers, right, now, we can see that we're getting close to the capacity as in, we can see the numbers getting close to where ICU beds are available, or won't be available. We can see those numbers coming up. And if we do so, so the question to ask yourself now is, with all the measures now and the brakes that we're trying to throttle on at the same time, if we're still heading in that direction right now, is it a smart move to the take the brakes off and say, You know what, let's just go and see what happens. The fact is where COVID naive where an underexposed population, it's, it's like lighting a fire in a dry forest, if you don't have all these other measures in place. And the thing is, some of us are the wood. That I gotta go. Another way to look at a Joe is, is okay, let's take off the shackles, you're going to everyone has to have a big party at their house, and you have to invite, you know, 50 people, Andrea can do it at her place. So So, so 50 people coming and 50 closest friends and relatives and people you haven't seen for ages. Now they can finally come over. So we're going to have the party but two of them will die by the end of the night. Yeah, happy to do that. I'm not well. The thing about this is the inevitable part of this. We have we talked about vaccinations and what vaccination can do with the best we can do all that's fine. But the problem is when you when you get to access, when you get to pass capacity, what happens is people die not because of COVID. Like in the US, what you see is people having a heart attack, nothing to do with COVID at all, but they can't find an ICU to look after them. So they die because there was no help available and it's not a problem. That I think people can look at themselves in the face and go like, or look at themselves in the eyes and say, Oh, that's okay. Because it's abstract right now people, people are desperate, they really want to get back to it. And I really feel for them. And it's always easy to blame somebody who's responsible for holding you back because of anti vaxxers and all those people. But there is a need for us to at least come back together, I go like, okay, let's have all these diverse views and at the same time, understand this thing about capacity, and say, Okay, let's not use it all up at the same time. Because if we do, then people are going to die. And it won't be just because of COVID. Although when we saw in India, a lot of people who did die, died of COVID. But not but it wasn't inevitable that they died, a lot of younger people died because they couldn't get access to oxygen. They couldn't get a hospital bed. I mean, I was talking to so many of my Indian friends, everybody I know, in India lost somebody, and a lot of younger people passed away. And it's literally because they were just completely overwhelmed. And we saw it in Indonesia, we saw at the hospitals in Bangkok, you know, there's, there's been some terrible, terrible stories, and there's a global oxygen shortage, you know, 4% of Africa has received a vaccine 4%. You know, we just were, then like the World Health Organization said, this is going to go deep into 2022, because we're not approaching it from a global perspective, and we're not taking care of every country, and variations and mutations are going to come. It's just, it's a bit of a relentless journey for all of us, right? Yeah, I wanted to just add, I don't agree with everything as Singapore government does. But I would say this, this situation is really a huge struggle for any government anywhere. I think they're trying to, to ride a fine line. But I also would say, I don't know when it was, some a month or two ago, whatever it was, Lucien Young was talking about how the numbers are going to get up to I don't know what he said 5000 or 8000 or 10,000 a day. And we want to control the access and the facilities for people to be able to be treated. And I find that this whole shutting down. It's not it's not a circuit breaker, it's not going back to what we had last year. But keeping it at two people in the restrictions that there are I find it I think they're doing as you said, Joe, doing the right thing, so that we don't go through the roof. So we're not lighting a match in the in a dry forest. But I think there it's also doable, I mean, we're, I'm, I'm really being conscious of not going nuts about this shutdown. Because a lot of people it is very upsetting to a lot of people, your back. It is upsetting to a lot of people and and a lot of people's lives are are up ended, but I don't know, I'm focused on helping to create calmness as much as possible, because it is we're not going to be through this anytime soon. And getting used to sometimes we're going to have cut back sometimes we won't. That's going to be around for a while. Yeah, that's my approach. Yeah, yeah. It's the same approach, right? Stop resisting it, it's a reality, and we're gonna have to get through it. Let's move into the environment. So a couple of really big pieces came out this week. And obviously we've got 26 coming up, there's a lot of environmental content coming out. There was another piece this week 99.9% of scientific research agrees that climate change is human induced. So that's gone from 97% to 99.9%. And there's also a leak of what the governments are trying to do with the IPCC report to get them to, to chop it down. But one of the big issues that I think we all really need to understand and invest our time and energy and attention in is is the technology solutions that are being offered. So there's a an amazing article called is sucking carbon out of the air the solution to our climate crisis. It's published in Mother Jones, obviously, it'll be my weekend reads this week. And this article really does take us on a journey where the technologies and there's multiple variations of this technology, its challenges, its opportunities, but most importantly, the solutions that have been put forward the strongest will actually mean the fossil fuel industry will continue as it is, for some time to come. So one of the technologies You're gonna hear more and more about his Kodak, which is direct air capture. Right now there's a pilot plant, I think it's up somewhere on the border in Canada. And he can process up to 1000 metric tons of co2 annually. Just to give you an idea, we emit 33 billion tonnes a year. So 1000 metric tons isn't a lot. But the idea is we capture, we converted it into fuel, we release more emissions, but we capture those emissions, so we're not increasing emissions. So that's kind of the idea. And the bigger idea is obviously we create build enough machine so we can start bringing down the co2 in the atmosphere and reverse climate change so and eventually not converting it into fuel will also start pumping it deep into the earth, which also has environmental impacts. So we're basically what we need to be doing is we need to be drawing down 10 billion metric tons of co2 per year. And the question in the article is this way where we should focus, and it makes the argument from every angle, so the government's subsidizing this technology, private billionaires are subsidizing it, too. But the money is nowhere near enough. And the price will only come down when the scale goes up. But it relies on the fossil fuel industry, because the fossil fuel industry has the infrastructure in place to be able to build the machines to sequester the carbon. And that means that that's an industry that can continue as it is. Another one is called bio energy with carbon capture and sequestration. Easy enough for you to say. And that acronym is back. So that's another one that you can hear about. And many say it's a fantasy, it's so it's the amount of physical space it needs to be actually implemented is just an impossibility. But from all I'm reading about Dec specs, and all the other ones, it's definitely going to have a part to play with the fossil fuel industry being able to maintain its business as usual for a decade, two decades, 50 years, the lobbying towards that technology is going to be what makes this the thing that we rely on the most. So as an example, people will fight. Let's plant trees, right? Okay. So a forestation and reforestation actually runs into the same problems is as Beck's and Dec to plant enough rich enough trees so that we can get to net zero by 2050. It requires 4 billion acres. And that is the equivalent to 80% of the global farmland currently on the planet. So it's a bit of a bind, if you look at it, but if all of the focus on the funding goes in one direction, we're pretty much screwed. So we need to be looking at doing multiple things and investing in all of them. If we have any chance of being able to come through this crisis and build build a better future at the other end. So did you guys have a chance to have a look at that article? Yeah. Oh, yeah. It's, it's, I wasn't aware of that. So this was new to me. But I like how it goes into outdoor backs. But I like how it goes into the detail about the background and what's possible. But fundamentally, yeah, it will mean getting, getting this carbon dioxide to be bought and used for some something, or stored somewhere, but also getting the big fossil fuel companies to get real trends, their direction, which is not going to be easy. Yeah. If you're interested in energy storage as well, which is another big problem that needs to be solved. So you know, solar, wind, how do we store the energy and then move it around the world? There's a podcast, Wall Street Journal podcast called the future of everything. And they're doing a series on carbon catch, capture. So I'd recommend having a listen to that. It's a really interesting part of the climate crisis conversation. All right. The other one is forget your carbon footprint. Let's talk about your carbon shadow. And I thought this was a really interesting point of view, that sort of, sort of so many of the arguments that arguments and conversations I'm having with people are that you drive a car. And I'm like, Well, of course, I drive a car because I live in a place where that's the only option that I've got is to drive a car and the electric electric infrastructure is in here. So you know, you can only be as green as you can be based on what's available to you. But basically, the article talks about two people. So one of them flies around the world every week, and the other one walks to work and lives in a small apartment, who's got the bigger footprint? Well, obviously the person who flies every week would have the bigger footprint but the person who walks to work and lives in a small apartment works for an advertising company, and they create ads for the fossil fuel industry. So that's that's kind of the message. It's a big, it's a bigger message. So BP introduced the concept of our personal carbon footprint nearly 20 years ago now, and we've been focused on that. But when we only focus on that we focusing on individual small actions that don't necessarily have the impact of the bigger actions, like who we vote for how many children we have, where we live, but equally how much we talk about the climate crisis, and try and get other people to act. And to think, you know, like, I won't buy a plastic bottle of water unless my children are dying. I literally will not I know do everything I can to make sure that I don't have plastic, if, if there's any way for me to, to avoid it. So it's really about climate shadow is about all of your life choices. And you know, so it's how you spend your money, how you vote, how much you talk about climate change, and also whether your words amplifying urgency, apathy, or denial, so your shadow gets bigger. So the three parts of the climate shadow, my consumption, my choices, and my attention. It's a really interesting perspective. And obviously, when I was reading it, I was realizing that my climate shadow is obviously a little bit smaller than a lot of people I know, because I'm certainly talking about it with urgency. So that was a really good place. Did you guys anyone have a chance to read that one? Yeah. And, and it was fascinating, actually. Because the the big picture, which you just talked about, of big companies talking about, you know, something that makes us focus on the little things, which is, which is fine. And that's, that's good, but it then we don't need to do anything big, because a big part of it seems too big. But I can, you know, make sure I don't use straws now. And that's, and that's where I put my energy or, or no plastic anywhere. But then they're not held to the fire. No one is no one's really feeling a sense of urgency, because I'm just, I'm taking care of my stuff. I've got my, but when you look at the shadow, it's a bigger thing. And that, and the the first little example that the article starts with which you mentioned, it's not just that the guy is, who is riding his bike to work is actually doing an ad for the big oil. It's a Did you look at the ad because I gave an example of an ad where it's one that they put out some years back not long ago, but it was about how whichever company I think it was based on was excellent. Yeah. Yeah. was, was, um, it had a picture of wind energy, you know, the windmill thing, whatever, like that. We're going into this new space now. But there, that's not what they're doing. That's not a big push. It's not there. It's, it's it's distracting anyway. No, I love that one. That one is I just think it's really worth reading. It's, it's lovely, actually. Does it give you does it make you want to talk up more? Didn't make it? Yeah. Yeah, it does. It's, it's, it's one that I think when you see a bigger picture, which is, which is what that article is about. It's not just it's to get where we need to get to, it's not going to, we're not going to get there in time. If we're thinking about little things. It's not to drop that, but but it the voices need to get bigger. Yeah. But I find when people focus on doing the little things and changing their life, they also start to become more aware. And then they become more, their voice becomes bigger, their concern becomes bigger, they notice more. So the little things do matter. Because it fundamentally shifts. You know, when people break, come walk into my house, and I go into the fridge, and there's a big plastic bottle of Coke. I'm like, why would you bring that into my own? You know, I'm outraged by it right. And, but it gives me an opportunity to say something. Well, because people just don't think that. Yeah, stuff like that, you know, I agree. But and so yes, we might voice out more in situations like that. But I think some people, I think that's why I really like what you're doing here with this no show, and with all of your weekend readings, because I think, really there is enough stuff out there that if enough people just get exposed to it and read it so that we learn more. It can have a bigger difference. It really can. What's my spend, spend time with the information that matters, right? Mm hmm. Well I think we sometimes don't look at and I think I think my wife's always wondering, why do I want to get into so many arguments? Right? I mean, with her as well. But you know, and the thing is, we're coming to a state i think i think there's a visit there's a place in the world where we're trying to let people have all their little discussions in our site, you know that the phrase you do you right, when we disagreed is that we disagree with someone's ideas or thoughts and we just say, Well, you know, let it let them do their stuff or whether it's harmless. And the thing is, it's not harmless it's to the point right now is someone's gonna do something that is ridiculous and is because they were inspired by an alternative truth. So I watched a video this week, and it was a very impassioned video by someone and anti vaxxer in Singapore young man. And he maybe was about religion, we would have said he'd been radicalized, but he was really just upset me the idea that everybody was being forced into this vaccination. And the phrase that I got from his video which is chilling and should be chilling is this he says, you know, some people want to be guided by the science and the data Oh, hang on. He said, some people want to be guided by the science and the evidence instead of the truth. And that's, it struck me so this is the thing right? They give them all kinds of information. So this thing about education is a double double edged sword, you're going to get information you're gonna get education from both sides you're going to have people who don't know what they're saying but are very much capable of going out there and making those speeches making those videos and they're getting lots and lots of clicks lots and lots of views feel lots and lots of of likes and views and the end they're getting their endorphin charge and then they're motivated to do even more and then they get all the confirmation bias and then they find the evidence that supports their stuff and because of confirmation bias they're not checking the details in the news I received the video from a friend of mine who was you know, he was just trying to be helpful and said the next pandemic is here and he shared with me this thing about this virus is new virus that was was the little outbreak was happening in Africa right now saying it's brand new that no vaccines and what's going to happen in the end is they're gonna come out there they were able to reveal that there was going to be a rollout of vaccines that was going to end up killing billions of people and the vaccine was made a Reisen and I went if you did any research at all before you forwarded that email to me, you would have found out Well no, this is not a new virus. This virus is actually from the 1960s as first appeared in Germany I can't remember the name of this virus right now but you'll see it soon enough. It's having a little bit of a resurgence right now and the middle of Africa and no one would ever make a vaccine from rice in because it's your toxin. Right But yeah, no one's doing the research to go that's not what's happening. That wouldn't happen but they've very kindly forwarded to me just to raise my blood left my my my blood pressure. And Joe, something that is I saw this morning, which will exacerbate that is you know, Trump now is going to come out with this new social media platform called truth social that is truth in all caps social. And he is the money has come in in a huge, huge amounts of something like this s PACs shares soared more than 40% on news of this social media deal that was completed. So that this truth social Trump platform that's that scares me. That's gonna be it's gonna be a miserable place to be. I know that much. But I saw something yesterday, Trevor Noah shared a tweet. So I don't know if this is true, but it was funny anyway. Apparently, on yesterday, somebody got hold of Trump's profile and replaced it with pink testicles covered in feces. So you can't access the site anymore. So that yeah, I mean, I saw it. I was just like, what a miserable place that'll be. And talk about talking about confirmation bias, right? Everyone's gonna be agreeing with each other. That's right, Joe, you might have a bit of fun on that one. Yeah, it was me. I'm sorry. I shouldn't have done it. Wasn't me. No, but But actually, I forgot I forgot the point. I was trying to get to the end. We were talking about just now right? Is it people need to come we need to get people to be able to rise up and have that counter conversation, you know, to have that rational conversation because there's a bunch of people who just don't know how to have that conversation. They don't they haven't been to to social media. I think last, and because of that, they just go like, you know what, I'm just gonna stay away, I'm gonna stay out of trouble here. I'm not going to get involved with this. And it just ends up, you know, in these in these echo chambers, which are just ridiculous. Some of the ideas. I mean, some of the there were some there were some, it's just the kind of circular arguments that happen for them that they that they keep pushing about truth. And then if you look at the very statement that they're saying, in itself, it's already kind of like, you know, contradicting itself, and no one's calling themselves out on it. You know, someone was talking about how COVID deaths they were complaining about this article saying that what's going to happen, what what happens is they don't report COVID deaths, and this article was about COVID deaths. And and I went, hang on, you're saying they don't report these numbers, but you're actually sharing an article where they're reporting the numbers Really? Well, hang on, was that, you know, yeah, like a logic, right? It's sort of, yeah, the lack of logic. So you said Bryson before? Yeah. I mean, just a good just a Google search. What is it? Well, you know, yeah, you know, like, and where is it? And is it being used, and then also fact checking yourself? You know, it's it. I mean, if you want to put information out there into the world, surely you don't want to be wrong, like, so I know that these people aren't doing it. Because they think they're wrong. They do believe in what they're sharing. And we, we have to work out a way to overcome that. And I don't know, you know, joining those social communities like you have, I don't know if that's a good thing to do. Because I actually think that's infectious soul. Eventually, you know, and you kind of lose faith in humanity, as well. So you've got to be cautious. Like, I've watched many friends rage on Twitter with people, I'm like, why are you bothering? Like, seriously, you can't have a conversation, all they want to do is abuse you. So rather than getting into these arguments, I've got somebody on YouTube recently attacking something I put out, and I'm like, Well, alright, that's your belief. That's your belief. I'm not gonna have a fight with you about it. I don't know you. You don't know me. I don't know what you believe. I don't know how much research you've done. So, but if it's you, one of you guys, I'll have I'll have an argument any day, because I know, you'll do the work. So I don't know, you know, but I think the rest of us need to be vocal on social media, we need to share the truth and the facts and the people who do the work and find the knowledge. I think it's, it's our obligation, too many smart people are silent, because of the stupidity that they see. And all that stupidity has a bigger platform. I think we need a I think we need to make a get, you know, like we talked about work life balance, I think we need to work on mental health balance, as well as like, I think what's happening is we've, we've kind of, we've kind of retreated into this place where we are trying to, we're trying to protect our mental health, right, so as as we do that, we say you don't want to listen to all this drama, it's just not worth it. And I think what we do is we need to have to come to some kind of balance because like, what's happening with the environment and everything else? I think I think this kind of mental health thing is also going to, we're going to pay a price for it. You know, if we if everyone retreats into that, you know what, let's just let's let's let the crazy people do what to do. We don't we don't get involved with the drama, what's going to happen is enough of that drama is going to happen, and it will hit us in a much bigger mental health wave down the line. So it's a little bit like the climate crisis, I feel I think that there's a crisis of stupidity is building up because we're allowing it to happen. If we're going like, oh, you're stupid, we look at that as a kind of handicap, we look at it as like we should we should allow them to, to have different privileges because they're obviously not, you know, whatever, right? And we shouldn't we shouldn't go all the way to that. And I think we should maybe give ourselves, you know, a five minute or 10 minute time ago, like, Okay, you know what, you need to do a little arranging today. And when you're done, go back in there and cool off, but you got to do some of that, you know, because right now, it's it's smart people staying silent start smart people doing set looking. I mean, you're looking at your feet, and you're getting angry, and you can see this impact, but you just go I give up on this particular thing. They're more important things to do. And when I think more people when too many people look away from the stuff that is important to say as not being the important thing to do, and no one says it. Yeah. Jamie being quiet. Yeah. Just listening. Okay. He's enjoying the show today. Yeah. He's one of our viewers. Yeah, I mean, you know, if there's so much going on, there's so much knowledge Since there's so much noise, and we're kind of preaching to the converted here, and so that's, that's the challenge in a nutshell, I guess. But the silent while we still need to be talking about it that we still need to be sharing because like, Andre, I mean, if the if all the news is stupid, then we're just gonna get dumber. Yeah. And and based on the way social media works, and the way trust now works. I mean, Trust has always worked as a way but but who we trust is diminished from the media outlets and the politicians and everybody else to just our social circles, then we have a big responsibility as people in those social circles to be sharing things that have some basis in truth. The challenges, of course, truth and truth has been questioned since post modernism came in the sort of 80s and 90s. And we've, we've all been saying everyone's got their own truth. And you know, you go live your own truth. And at some point, we will have a discussion about what is truth? Is your truth the same as my truth? Or is there a truth beyond our perspective, and, and that's possibly when we can agree on what the baseline for having any sort of logical rational debate will be. And that is that there is a baseline upon which we can have an argument. Otherwise, I'm arguing about oranges, and you're, you're arguing about astronauts, and they've just got nothing to do with each other. When you go through history, I mean, one of the signs of the end of civilization is always when the intellectual sort of level of the society is pulled down, murdered, kicked out. And, you know, you saw at the end of Persia, when the Shah came to power, the first thing they did was get rid of the intellectuals. So when we when we move into a time, where the people who were doing the work of scientists that the medical professionals were, they are heard and trusted them, we know that we've got a problem in our in our global society. And we're saying it by now, all around the world. So I do believe that we all have, we have a responsibility to humanity to participate, even if it's horrible, but then I've talked to, they're just like that they find it so upsetting to be on social media these days because of what's going on. So stop following people who upset you have a small have a smaller footprint, you know, if that's going to help your mental health, but if you can, if you're strong enough to participate, please don't go away because we need you. To move on to the to the next bit. So I pay a fair bit of attention to what goes what's going on in China. Do you guys kind of interested in China and everything that goes on over there? Yeah, yeah. So there's some there's some pretty weird stuff like last week I was talking about. LinkedIn is going to close their China operation. One of the most popular Muslim prayer chats on Apple has been removed by Apple. And there's also a rising group of young influences, who are out there sort of speaking the the party's sort of dialogue, right, so the anti West sentiment is rising. Today, Biden said that, if China does anything to Taiwan, America will protect Taiwan. But in this last week, we've had some other interesting things happen. So apparently, China has tested a hypersonic nuclear missile. And America is a hypersonic capable, atomic nuclear capable missile. Thank you, thank you for the correction. Then the US basically said that they're defenseless against a weapon like this, and they don't have anything that can deal with it. China has denied testing this missile. And at the same time, within a few hours of China doing this north, North Korea obviously launched a missile into the waters. So this is just this been this has been going on this week. And, you know, obviously, it's the same Cold War rhetoric we saw with Russia. I was remember working for an aerospace company and the fighter jet that we were terrified of was at the airshow in Melbourne, and I went inside this fighter jet and I remember everyone, you know, there was technology at a level that we couldn't quite comprehend. I remember going inside this fighter jet at the airshow, and it was just basically a shambles. I mean, it looked like it was blue glued together, right? But so when I look when I look at the rhetoric around sort of Cold War language, I'm always looking at it through those sort of eyes. But it is a little bit of a concern considering everything else that's going on in the world, that here we are in another cold war at a time when we really got other bigger priorities to be focused on more than ever, but the language of division, the language, I mean, the US. The defense have just released a report basically saying, you know, where the risk of war and you know, climate crisis climate refugees, they will come out in a report that was just released just in the last 24 hours. So, yeah, I'm a little bit concerned about where the world's leaders minds are right now. I don't think they're in the right place. What do you guys think? I was getting a bit doubtful and skeptical. When, when a country's national defense day we can't defend ourselves. I mean, I saw it, then I go, why would they say that? So most people would usually say, Oh, you know, this is ludicrous, and bla bla, bla, bla, bla, bla, they wouldn't go out and say, we can't defend ourselves against that. Unless they want something. And then I just go, Well, what do they want? Well, they want to spend more money on arms and weapons, and they want to sell the weapons and these defenses, everybody else. And then I'm just like, and then I just go, you know, seriously. I mean, I guess if your number one export is weapon, I get it. But everyone needs to know that. Yeah. So I just, I, after a while I just did and this is the problem. I guess this is the biggest challenge. We all become ostriches with our heads in the ground. Because, because it's just, you know, these guys are playing a game that's tiresome. Really? Yeah. Hey, Kathy, you've probably got something more intelligent to say than that? I don't think so. But I do have something to say I'm reading a book called 2034. Have you heard of that? By Eliot Ackerman. This, I haven't finished it. But this is a novel that is actually happening right now in real life, except that it hasn't gone to the point that it has an a novel. It's that in the year 2034. Not right now. The US president has said if China does anything to to Taiwan, that we will you know, we're laying down the conduit here, this is a red line. And they did and then something else happened. I'm not gonna ruin the book, but it is absolutely fascinating. I'm, I'm having to fight off reading it right here, right now. But um, it's it's a it's a real page turner. But it escalates in a way that what what happens in real life happens, which is unexpected things happen. It's, it's, and then I heard Biden was saying, we're gonna protect Taiwan. It's an amazing kind of. It's amazing. I didn't I didn't know about this. this. Um, yeah. Sorry. One little important part is that the technology in the story is something that China has come up with that cloaks, that is a, they can cloak their weaponry, and their ships and everything else. And the US has not nothing to protect itself with that. And that's how it goes crazy. It's like when the when the people from the US were saying yes, we don't have anything we can do against that. cite one of this is this is this book is happening right now. It's earlier than 2034. Yeah, what's this? called, again? 20 2034. sequels 2035. Every time, every time. It's better. I will be a spoiler in itself when it is the subtitle is Planet of the Apes. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. China is such an interesting country. To me, if you one of my favorite history, subjects was always China. And every time China takes its eye off the domestic ball, it loses control of its country. And the one thing China doesn't want to lose is control of its country. They've got to 70 of the world's population living there, right. But also the climate impacts that are going to start happening more and more like they can't, they can't get their coal out of their minds because the mines have been flooded because of climate change. So I don't know like China's closing off at a time. That I think is a really bad sign. Because we need to work together we need global cooperation. So yeah, I'm keep an eye out for the news on China. It's it's a significant shift. It's definitely a signal. If you can shift diplomatically, can I can I offer another view on this? If you were China, and you were looking out and you just look at the rest of the world, and how the world evolving right now, wouldn't you want to keep everybody out? Yeah. I mean, you know, that's the thing that I think has has has come around because I think for for quite a while, they just said, Okay, now what we'll do is we'll have a balance of, of more capitalism, and that's going to be fine. It's going to work out. Okay. And what's interesting about China and me, and it's, it's outdated for sure. But whether or not it's something that that is desirable, I mean, have a think about this. I kind of feel like China is what Lee Kuan Yew might want to have. He had his choice. If he had the the the way things were going to be I think he might have done it that way. Where you kind of decided this is for the greater good, we'll do this, this is the for the greater good, we'll do this, this is going to be uncomfortable, we'll do this people are going to complain about this, but we'll do it anyway. And they kind of went ahead and they just did it. You know, and I think just No, not that I agree with what they're doing. Not that I agree with the the liberties that they that they that they trample on the way. But I also see the value of what they're doing. I mean, that they're holding on to some wisdom, they're holding on to something where they go like this is worthwhile to hold on to because we don't want to let go of these values. They're looking at escalating property prices and saying that No, that isn't sustainable. You know, we can't throw our next generation into that kind of a situation, it's not going to work. And they say, okay, we're gonna fix that we're gonna do something about that. It's gonna hurt, but we'll do it, you know? So, yeah, yeah. I mean, I do agree there's a need for cooperation. But I think the problem is, whose rules are we gonna go by, you know, we went when when China's invited to play, they know how to play, they're invited to give up what they believe in, so you can play our game, rather than Okay, let China let's see what your ideas and see how we can work with your ideas. And I think that's the problem. The problem is people don't want to go the China way, even though representatively, they represent a lot of people they should do, even from a purely democratic point of view, they should have a greatest day in the world. But we refuse to let them have it. Yeah, I agree. I agree. There's a lot of ways to look at this. A lot. Yeah. All right, shall we move into our theme for the week, and I'm looking forward to hearing what Kathy has got to say being our most authentic selves. I don't think any of us struggle with that. Authenticity is something we're hearing a lot about today, right. And I think it's also at risk of becoming just another buzzword. It's been it's overused, but also I think the meaning of it isn't necessarily widely understood, and what it what it really truly means. So Kathy, would be happy to share with us why it's important. What it really means, why it matters, what it what it can deliver to you personally, and maybe tips, ideas, whatever, on how people can work to become their most in thought, authentic selves. So I'll hand it over to you. Thanks, Andrea, I appreciate the opportunity to share this because it really means a lot to me. And you're right, authenticity is a word that is used a lot now, when I use it, I'm referring to a need. A need to both understand ourselves, like who we really are, what we really believe and care for, outside of the conditioning that we all got growing up with. And also the need to act from that place, which requires self confidence and courage. It means acting from from inside, instead of continuing to just go along to get along, which is what most people aren't most of us do until we start to find ourselves. It's where we get to where we can make a difference in our own lives and in the world. So I would just say in general, it's about getting clear of what we were brought up to believe about ourselves and about the world. I would also say that most people are living, stressful lives, ongoing lives, not living with presence, not really doing, having time to do some self reflection about themselves or about what matters to them. So I'm just Since you asked about, what can we do to get there, there are two parts as I see it. One is to know yourself to really know yourself. And I would say most people have a sense about themselves, but they don't know themselves deeply. I'm going to recommend two books. One, you may have heard of uncommon courage by Andrea Edwards. Because it's one of the things I love about that book is, it's you're sharing your journey to understanding yourself. Things that you uncovered, just like your own inner voice, inner critic, reading a book like that can help us to also question ourselves and say, what is what is there for me? It's all about uncovering who you really are outside of your conditioning everyone. Everyone on the planet was conditioned, Oh, there you go. There's that book. I have one here. But I've had a look backwards. There's a second book I would recommend, which also can be helpful to understand our lives outside of our conditioning. And yeah, that one, too. Yeah. Yeah, that will help that yeah, that's the one. That's the one. No, there's another one called the Four Agreements, the Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz. there lots of books. But those two, I would strongly recommend, it's just a way to start to understand, first of all, that we all got this conditioning everyone's trying to help us to, to survive in the world when we're little. And so we take on some understandings of things. And they may or may not be true for us. It's, it's what we were told, honestly, from people to try to help us to live and survive. So the first step is to know yourself to really know yourself, uncover what really matters to you. And part of that is do some kind of slowing down some kind of reflection, some kind of grounding practice, so that you slow down and you can start to be with yourself. And then you, you also may need some support to get clear, that can speed things up. So So I would just say very often people I work with coaching or seeing in workshops, very often people are suffering, we're suffering from one thing or another in our lives, but we don't really know that things can be different, or how to step into that. Very often, we don't even know we have agency that we can do something. Anyway, that's the first one is to know yourself, the second one is to act from that place. And what that requires, which is, there's no short supply of that in this little room here. But it requires self confident, confidence and some real courage. It means having difficult conversations, which could mean when someone comes down and you find they put a plastic bottle of coke in your refrigerator, you're saying something, but it also could be speaking up when someone says something racist, or sexist or ageist or homophobic. Saying that you're gay or trans or whatever, getting help when you're being battered. Telling the truth about your relationship with your spouse, to really acting from a place that's more real and whole. So I'm talking about living with integrity. That's really it. And the impact when people do develop over time, which I I'm fortunate I get to see because I'm a coach. The impact is on not only themselves, its own people around them on family members people at work. But it can also then develop into what am I really here for what really matters to me, what do I want to step into, and start helping in the world? So for me, that's why it's super important. Yeah, that's, I love that, you know, one of the things that I talk a lot about is work out what your true values are, and then anchor yourself in your values. And to me, it's a starting point, right? So if you're a person of your word, and you say to yourself, I am a person of my word, and nobody can switch me off will knock me off my anchor, then you do over time. People will understand your person if you would. But you've got to anchor yourself in them. So remember some younger people that I've worked with in the past, I could see them coming in, and they were still trying to work out who they were. And I was watching other people, constantly knocking them off their values. And before before they knew it, they were lost. And that's, to me the beginning of the journey. And you've got to get back to that person. And just, if you can remember, you know, what's important to you, what were you not compromise on. And I know, I know the crap out of my husband with my values, but he also knows that there's things that I'm uncompromising on as he is right. And we're very clear with each other what those things are for each of us. So values to me is super important. I agree. That's super important. I also find that assuming you just said that I was gonna comment on and now it's gone. Husband Oh, yeah. No, no. No, but it'll come back. No, oh, yeah, I'd say thank you. Thank you. If that didn't work? I don't know. It'll come back. It doesn't care, probably the anchor what she's talking about the anchor anchoring in your values. So I guess my question then is, if I ain't getting my value, at this age, when should I change that? When When should I allow myself to be influenced by a better version of it? Yeah. Yeah, so so sorry, Tim. Tim, why don't you hang on to that I stole the idea. Come back to Kathy, let's let's go back to Kathy before it leaves her again, he wrote. But Tim can Yeah, yeah, I wrote it down. That's right. I'll just say real quickly. So you know, I'm with you about the values. But I also sometimes hear people say things like, Well, you know, that's just, you know, I can't change that's just the way I am. And I figured out some some time in the past years ago, that the truth is, whatever we say this is just the way I am, I can't change. Really, that's it. That's rarely the way we really are. And the way I describe it is that is this, I asked the person, just imagine that if you were born on an island, and there was nobody else there, you grew up on this island. And when you're 25, or 27 years old, someone landed on the island, you're not going to walk up to that person and say, Look, I just can't get along with people like you can't, because you're not going to say this is the way I am I always I always I have to have the data and I can't, you know, if I don't have the data, then I can't have a conversation. It's it's that things have happened to us in life that it made us make choices about how, how we are. But that's part of I'm with you about the values is starting. Starting from that is a great place to start. But I also think people need to be do some reflection in order to get there. Because we all have been told by whether it's whether it's our family members, or school people or extended family, or the society or whatever, what this is the this is these are the right values. And this is what you need to live by, and we very often take them on. So I'm helping people to actually get to what really is their values? What do you what do you really stand for? What really matters to you? That's not so easy. No, no. And what Tim was saying, like, you know, so one of your values is I tell the truth. If you grow out of that, and say now I want to lie, that, you know, that's it's a decision, right? But um, yeah, it but you're right, cuz you got to go inside. And you got to say is that me is that mine? was given to me by my parents by the church, I attended whatever. Yeah, and then you've got to say, just sit with me. And you've got to, you've got to have silence in your life to be able to do that. And one of the things that I talk a lot about is go, you know, for me, it was travel, you know, just on the road for months and months and months facing my mind. Not everybody needs that much time, but I certainly did. But yeah, but I also find people are scared to face themselves. Yeah, there's a lot of terror, you know? Yeah. Yeah. You must have seen that in your work, Jake, Kathy? I do I do. And and there's a real hesitation to really look at what's there and sometimes people, we just had a coaching session a couple of days ago with someone saying, I don't know what I don't even know how to react to that. I don't know what I don't know. I don't I know what that is. It's Yeah, it can be scary. But it's also people get through it. It's not like it's a, you know, it's not like you're running into a brick wall or something, you know what I mean? Yeah. And it's comes in stages. And sometimes you get tired of it. And sometimes when you evolve the people in your life that are no longer relevant, yes. Or you start to recognize that that's they're actually creating harm for you. I was speaking to someone, just recently, they, they got rid of all of their friends. Because on their 50th birthday, not one person turned up. And my heart aches, so much for this person that you could be put in that situation. But she realized that she wasn't surrounding yourself the sort of people that she should be surrounding yourself with. It was sad, and it was heartbreaking. But she grew from it, you know? So look around us as well. Sorry, Tim. Yeah. Oh, no, I just burst into tears, because I realized nobody turned up to mind, but we're all in lockdown at the time. Yeah. I think the I think the idea of reflection is a really good one. It's very challenging one, I think. I think that is that takes a lot of courage. But it also takes a bit of planning to do it. Because I think a lot of the time we go through our lives, experiencing something and tolerating it until it gets to the point of it forces us to make a call on that. And that takes a long time. That process takes a long time of getting down to the bottom and then just going No, I don't want that. So now I know what I don't want. And we I mean, that happened a lot for me with with, you know, relationships, it was like, I don't know what I want a relationship. And I'm in relation we go well, I don't want that. And so and then, Okay, next. Now, I don't want this as well. And so basically, by building up the whole list of things I didn't want, I was able to then kind of work out what I probably do want. And, you know, I could have saved myself a bit of time. But, but sometimes you kind of got to live it. Yeah, I agree. Sometimes. Yeah, you got to live it well. But one of the things I work with people on is is moving those conversations back further towards when you first you know when you if you get together you're seeing someone and you're dating or something and then they do something and you're all in love and everything's great and everything they do is wonderful but then that something happens you and your thinking Can't you know that's weird but Eliane I love you. And so you let things slide the same things happens, the same things happen in the workplace, when someone does something that we don't like, and we don't want to. Well, you know that he'll look he'll get better you'll, you know, he won't do that forever. But then he does it again. And then we start zoning a little later fraud. Yeah, yeah, right, only a little bit of $10,000. Anyway, and then it gets to where we're looking at the person in a different way. Now we're thinking cateye is just totally lazy. She doesn't even care about this team, whatever it is, we're thinking that we've made up now because we never had that conversation to just say Wait, wait, I saw you do it like this. And I'm wondering about that what is that about? Because we could all save ourselves in terms of relationships, we're we're down the road on relationships, but everyone could save themselves some heartache by just speaking up, which is where the courage comes from. But I also know I'm unlike you, Tim. I I learned about what I wanted what was great for me and what wasn't by making mistakes, and just that's how we learn. So your question just now is fantastic, though. It's like so I saw you do this. I'm wondering about that. So I'm owning my wondering, but I'm, I'm offering the platform for them to explain themselves rather than going you did it like this and therefore you're wrong. You're just basically going into battle. Or even worse, you know what why did you do it like that? Is that what you think that's right. I mean, what it's anything you're doing where you're poking somebody else? Yeah, as if you wanted to connect to the God and you know, everything. That's it's just not okay, it's respecting the other person. That's it, and that you can do the same thing in the workplace as in your private life. I've had a few. I've had a few conversations via Kathie, about expectations as well. And so some of this, some of it comes down to expect what do we expect of others that hadn't been explicitly discussed and your brand Thanks, wonderful. Yeah. Sure. I'm a guy I was coaching in the past at a company. But it was during the COVID times, he was working at home. And he has a couple kids and his wife was home too. So he was in their bedroom and set up his office there. But he went out to get a cup of coffee in the kitchen. And one of the kids had left out, some of them didn't clear up all the Legos. And he was walking barefooted and stepped on a Lego now, you know, that's not going to be a pleasant feeling. And he, you know, we were having this session, he told me, he said, I just, you know, is so angry, it was like, why did you know, why didn't she get this thing picked up? And here I am, you know, my foots, hurt, hurt, etc. And so then I asked him, I said, you know, I'm sure that heard a lot. I said, I'm interested in knowing about the conversation you had with your wife earlier, where you discussed about and agreed that she would be in charge of making sure all the Legos were picked up on the off the floor? And he looked at me, he said, Oh, yeah, yeah, we didn't have that conversation. Got it. It's like, we go off sometimes and assume someone's read our mind that, you know, yeah, it's unexpressed expectations, cause lots of problems at home. And in the workplace, too. Yeah, you know, expectations are amazing, you know, you'll meet somebody and, and their father has let them down for 40 years, and they still expect it to be different. And because they still expecting it to do to be different, they're living in pain, and just stop expecting anything else. And then, because we're actually when you move out of expectation, and you actually expect nothing, often they actually step up a little bit. But it doesn't, it's my shrinking the bubble analogy, right? Not everyone's going to be able to meet your expectations. So the best thing to do is to not have expectations, I have expectations of my husband. And I have expectations of my children, but they're different, because I'm allowing them to grow. And you know, they're going to make mistakes. And so my expectations can't limit that growth it but it's, you know, there's things like, tell the truth, they respect all that sort of stuff, right? But expectations are the bane of our existence. And so many people struggle. So many with that. Well, he certainly and here's the thing, it's actually expectations. Um, I don't know, it's like, I totally agree. What we can share is, here's what I'd like, what I would like is this, but you need to verbalize it. Because otherwise if we don't verbalize it, we just make assumptions. And assume they're going to do it and then they don't and then, you know, there's a Lego on the floor, and we're going nuts about it. But it it's, it's, it's actually saying what you're thinking and making a request. But the person other person is an adult, except for your kids, although they're pretty close there. And they can say no, if they want to. Yeah, any a dog can but but just you have to ask. Yeah. And then if they never get if they say to you, I can't give you what you want. Yeah, scepter Yeah, then live your life on. You know, that's what it is. And it's a great thing to know, if you if if you have a boss, for example, who is really rude always interrupts you. And if you say, you know, I, one thing I noticed is that three times this morning, when I've been speaking, before I finished you started speaking on top of what I was saying. You know, what I'd really like is, if you can find a way to allow me to finish what I'm saying before you started, that would be really great. Is that, is that okay for you? The thing is, they could say, look, sorry, but no, that's not me. And if I want to say something, I'm going to say something. If it were me, I wouldn't want to know that my boss felt like that. I'd be looking for another boss or myself. But it really but if you don't ask, they're never going to change. They might say, you know what, I heard someone say this. You know, my wife tells me that all the time. And, you know, I know I need to make a change. And then they said I'm sorry. But the point is, we need to just ask, because ask and listen if and you're right, they say no. Well, okay, now I know. And I can make changes or, or decisions in my own life, which could say, you know what, I'm just going to live with them because I really love this job. But it might not. Yeah, important information. Absolutely. Don't suffer in silence. Right. You know, have an You know, for some people, it's very difficult to speak up and have those conversations. But if you're struggling, you know, that's where someone like Kathy would help, right? Getting a coach or a mentor or somebody who can help you, you find what the right words are, but don't continue to suffer. And if you've got a boss, he's just a plain bully. If you're still there, 12 months later, then, you know, you've got to you got to ask yourself why. So yeah, yeah. Yeah, so actually my agreement, sorry. So the four agreements are, be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Always do your best. And the fifth one is, be clear on who picks up the Lego piece. Yeah, yeah. And that one comes out and 2036 2034 and pretty good. No, it's true. But I tell you, you have to read the book to really get to same thing with uncommon courage. Read the book, don't just, you know, really, it's super, super important. And so helpful. The book you really want to write is Lego, the Lego already. Your, your, I mean, one of the things here and one of the things about coaches, one of the things one of the things that makes coaches that differentiates great coaches from lesser ones, is their ability to ask great questions. And, and one of the things I think people can really learn from great coaches is a great way to ask a question and if some of those things that you just mentioned, then I'm interested in knowing it when you know, it's not even a question it's a sort of a statement. I'm a bit more about this, like when you have that conversation, or I'm wondering about that I noticed that you know, earlier today I was interrupted three times before I could finish and I'm wondering about you know, whether we can have a conversation about that, you know, I think the way of asking questions like that would be is really powerful. I can tell you I have clients who I mean we're we're talking about whatever challenges there are going on in their own lives but I'm very often people are making notes about just how to ask a question in a way that is not that's not poking somebody. It's not in any way harming it is coming from a totally respectful place and more likely to get what you're looking for, which is not for someone to run screaming from the room or to be irritated at you because you're not poking them in any way. Yeah. I do have a suspicion that wearing this shirt while I'm asking any kind of question no matter how helpful it is. Not the wrong message. Is my buddy All right. All right, Kathy. Now's a great time to plug that book that you're writing, which is about this so it's called what's it called amazing questions by Kathy Johnson or something like that. Yeah, it's something like that. No one's gonna be tiny. Oh, it's gonna be 33 Okay, it's not gonna be late. The world goes to crap I'd be happy with the blog post to start with was from Kathy I hear you darling me. Let's get on to the other news that got your attention this week. I've got a cracker of you guys got some good ones? Yeah. Okay. Joe does as you got to do with Bitcoin and everything else. Eau de Andrew go first. All right, there is a there's a story code sprinkled gate. Have you heard this one? Oh. My dog did to the neighbor's. Apparently a British biker has been caught using illegal American sprinkles. Oh no. I saw I saw a headline. Yeah, yeah. What's I don't know what? Yeah. Well, he knows what American foods full of semi additives and preservatives. I'm sure that would be my guess. But, but i think that i think American sprinkles are rubbish. The best Australian anyway. So you know. That was a funny, funny break from serious news for me. Yeah. All right. Well, that might explain why Taiwan is in trouble. Alright, the one for me. The one for me is that the the Queen who's 95 visited hospital and it's not to do with COVID it's about it's for Preliminary investigations. And it meant that she didn't have to go to Northern Ireland. But, and this is not actually a funny article at all. It's just something I noticed, but I decided to make it funny. She She went to hospital on Thursday after having dinner with Boris Johnson on Tuesday. And actually, she had dinner with Boris and Bill Gates and a bunch of others. Pre there's these these talks that are coming up, so But yeah, she's getting on the queen. I'm worried for her. Yeah, well, I'm not worried for I mean, Joe's inevitability comments earlier on, there is an element of inevitability, the next few years, but, but yeah, I just noticed that it's not the most important news in the world. But I so I understood, I didn't have a chance to have a look into it. But it's kind of one of those, you know, age stories, you know, once once this process begins and an amazing job. Yeah, it's been amazing. And it's gonna be really interesting time for England once she passes. Yeah, that's going to be a very strange one for whole UK. The other one I noticed was the there was a an article of research paper put together by scientists from various parts of the world, and they were looking at the trout, how tropical countries lost a lot of five hours of daily physical activity per person in 2020, because of climate challenges, and and then how dengie is one of the things that could resurface in a significant and serious way, in the tropics, with, for example, Singapore noticing, it was, at the same time, 2021 saw the rise of a locally red dengie virus called the den v three. And we haven't seen an outbreak of this in 30 years. Because So these things are starting to make a comeback, because it conditions that we're creating conditions that are going to harm ourselves. So that five hours a week, is that per person, per week, or this this was I have to find that one, but it was it. My understanding was it was they lost five hours a day of daily physical activity. So presumably, that's people that were outside doing stuff note with performing buildings. Yeah. I'd be interested in defeat. I'll try to find the numbers on that. Because five hours per day right now, we'd be catastrophic. No, it has to be even longer period. Yeah, if you think it was, even it was, if we lost five hours of work time for the year, multiplied out by the entire population of people who live on the equator, that's going to be huge. Yeah. And when we get to 1.5, that's when we move into that sort of too hot to live territory in May, we've already seen the two hot sort of situations happening all over the world. But when it moves up from a temperature perspective, then that's when we go into famines and excellence, which you were just talking about. And you know, so so let me just put that spective if it is five hours, per person per year, which sounds insignificant, just remember that there's there's about 261 workdays per year, and after annual leave, and everything else, and sick days, and everything else I calculate is years years ago, you will end up with about 221 work days a reasonable amount of work days. And, and if that if we have eight hour or nine hour day, let's say eight hour days and an hour for lunch, 221 multiply by eight is, is 17 168 hours, work hours per year. And if we've lost five of those, then that is sort of point 3%. And that point 3%, or those that even the five hours multiplied by a million people is a lot of full time work lost. You know, based on based on just these these small links, but anyway, I'll try and find out what the actual figure is. But I just noticed that two things one was the rise of dengie in this part of the world. And then there was another article talking about delta plus in Russia. Have you heard of delta plus? No, no. Okay, we'll talk about that. Who else has got something? Well, I want to tell the the horrible, horrible story of the man who lost his key to his bicycle lock. I don't know if you've had any of this yet. But this is one of those stories that's been hugely popular locally. A guy loses a key to his bicycle, in a mall, and it's such as desperately for All kinds of ways to free his bicycle from his own lock. He wants to get a wire cutter from the mall and the mall won't limit to him because the key can't prove that it's his bicycle. So what he does in the end is something that's inadvisable. He calls the police. Now he calls the police to say that the bicycle was stolen and he'd found the bicycle at the mall and then the bike and then what the police would do was come over and that helped him free his stolen bicycle, right? All this sounds like a bad idea already. And it's worse when you find out that he also is a police officer himself. And you're having a great day. The funny thing is he had actually gone ahead and taken the advice of his colleagues on on chat as he was saying what do I do with this? And I think some of his helpful colleagues they kind of joke with him and go like you know we should do is just call it in and then this will happen and that will happen. And as the article said, I can't remember which online platform said it. The the next line was in bold, he says he actually calls the police, right? Because he takes the man advice. So he's been charged and the good news is his colleagues have not you just need to think Singapore news. So always amazing. Kathy, have you got any ones? Yeah, um, I've just uh, okay, here's one article from the New York Times. in Bogota, Colombia, they have set up a hotline for men, and it's aimed at aiming aim is at fighting violence against women, the focus is on men to teach them to understand their emotions and control their actions. The whole idea is pushing men to focus on how that often unexamined, unexamined attitude is hurting their own lives and the lives around them so they're looking to inspire a deeper cultural change which I just find interesting and they're they're apparently there that's people calling in that's what I also Yeah, yeah. I also I have this thing about animal cruelty it is it is really hard for me and I read this article this was a CNN thing but it was about somewhere in California or the state of California California pork prices were going up due to this new change where they're going to allow sounds so female pigs to not be pinned up in a very small space I didn't write down what that it's like they're they're living their lives in this little place where they can't move much berm and now they've made this new law where they can actually have some spare thing is 25 feet by something but the big news item was it the price is going to go up and that's going to hurt the markets in the sense the other I don't know that drives me nuts. Right? Because we eat we eat the pain and suffering of the animals that we eat. So if you want to eat meat surely you want to eat meat from animals that don't have all those stress in their bodies right? Yeah, yeah it's phenomenal. Yeah, please All right. You guys ready for the next bit the final the finale? All right, what's keeping you distracted? At the moment I was talking about the podcasts that I've been listening to Wall Street Journal's future of everything. Keep an eye on that. It's It's good. They do some really good topics but right now they're doing this energy storage one which I think is important for us to learn. So who's obviously cutting you've been reading anything on the acts or podcasts or anything? Margaret's out of town so I'm not watching anything. And watch anything for five weeks? Um, she does all the Netflix and all that stuff. I don't do that. I but I do watch but not what? It's just me. Really rocking in the corner? No, I love my books. I really do. So um, um, um, I'll tell you one other book. It's okay to talk about books. Yeah. What are they? Again, just where's the one I just oh, this is not a I did it on Audible. This is wonderful. Another wonderful book that is by a coach. And the name of it is the way of integrity. It's one I could have written But anyway, it's not exactly her. It's she's using her story as well, but the way of integrity by Martha Beck It's a it's a brilliant one. I only recommend that one. That's keeping a while I just finished that. Now it's 2034 and I just can't wait. What's gonna happen? I love a book like that. Tim, Tim, What's got you What's got you distracted? I've been I've been binge watching the Orville. I've been it's been a restrained binge, because there's only two seasons. So I'm like wanting to binge but I have to like I have to stop Otherwise, I'll watch it all the way anything else to watch? So and I've been saving up I'm very good at saving. I'm very good at saving television shows I've been saving up only murders in the building, so that there's a few episodes that I can binge because I can't stand waiting a week for the next one. So I've seen some more. There's more talk about murders in the building now on social media. I don't know if you notice I people are obviously starting to pay attention to it. Once they've heard it on this show, obviously. Steve Martin and Martin Short being famous. Yeah, Joe? Well, first of all, we say I would hate that a show like this would be the source of recommendations for viewing because people have to go through all the other important stuff to get to it. Right. I really enjoy the podcasts that come out of the Pushkin networks a Pushkin is one that's built around Malcolm Gladwell and his stuff. And there's one here called cautionary tales, cautionary tales with Tim Harford, superbly written, or I should say superbly rewritten. He's one of these guys who's very good at going out there and finding something from somewhere else and putting it together and telling the story well, so he's not necessarily the most original of writers. But what he does is he finds those interesting stories and brings them to you. And so he brings all kinds of Tales, essentially, that are not quite what they see when you first hear about them. So and always with a with a with a twist, where you go like, oh, okay, so I should really think about things a little bit more. So cautionary tales. He's got, I think, two seasons or three seasons of it already. And each one is well rested and well produced, well researched, and always interesting. So the thing that he's got right now is something which I think is really relevant in the time that we have right now. The title is called the truth about Hansel and Gretel. And I won't I won't do a spoiler on this but it is basically the question of what happens when you say something is true. When it's not, you know, so it starts off and I can I can tell you this part but like the movie Fargo I have never seen the movie Fargo and I understand that the movie Fargo starts by telling you that this is based on a true story which apparently it's not so that's that's the kind of thing that it discusses and that's the kind of thing I think the world that we're living in is based on everybody has that it's based on a true story without any substantiation. You know, the author of wicked and that he did a whole series of books where he took famous fairy tales and then wrote different stories so we could talk about the Wicked Witch, right? And it tells her story, and it was a story that we never got and it's sort of the same guy is different tonight. This is this is this is Tim hapa he's not a he's Tim Harford is much more about the truth rather than than then then rewriting stuff. But he does talk about he does talk about some creative work that's gone into that and how people are affected by that because I mean, like, I mean, then Dan Brown's a good example of someone who writes something that if you're not paying attention, you're like, wow, this is real. Yeah, you know, you'd have to be of course very distracted. They don't realize that the word novel is part of it, but the other day that people believe that Dan Brown novels says truth just the other day I was reading something about it so yeah. Oh yeah. And several movies have been the basis of people's historical recounts about you know how we had this guy on the on Mars and he survived completely on on potatoes and stuff like that. And we set up a rescue mission and brought him back and you know how wonderful we are. We could go world hunger if we didn't spend all the money saving Matt Damon from being lost in space. In lots of movies. Well, I think it's not just in space. We he was private Ryan's we had to save him. We had to save him from Mars. We had the saving from somewhere else for saving him from everywhere. Yeah, maybe it's worth saving. Alright guys, lock them up in a small pen next to a pig Yeah. Alright guys, first of all, Kathy, thank you so much for joining us. We hope you come and join us again. It's really My pleasure. Yeah, that perspective of authenticity, I think it was. It's a really important conversation that we all need to be having more of, and trying to help other people who are struggling with, you know, speaking their truth, or finding the right words to sort of solve some of the challenges that they're facing. I upload the podcast as quickly as possible to uncommon courage. So if you'd prefer to listen to this as an audio that's there every week. But otherwise, that's it. That's the show for this week. Keep a lookout for delta plus, which is called a why 4.2 in Britain, just, that's the one the Russia is worried about. So they're going to lock down because apparently it's even more contagious. So we gotta, you know, take care of everyone. Yeah, just remember, we're two weeks behind the COVID News. The virus always wins. Yeah. All right. So we'll see you next week. Thanks, guys. Bye