Uncommon Courage

The Know Show – theme: why we’ve got to do better for girls, with Arishta Khanna

October 15, 2021 Andrea T Edwards, Tim Wade, Joe Augustin, Arishta Khanna Episode 19
Uncommon Courage
The Know Show – theme: why we’ve got to do better for girls, with Arishta Khanna
Show Notes Transcript

Welcome to The Know Show. Every week, Andrea T Edwards, Tim Wade and Joe Augustin review the news that’s getting everyone’s attention, as well as perhaps what requires our attention. We’ll talk about what it means to us, the world and we hope to inspire great conversations on the news that matters to all of us. 

This week we’ll be joined by Arishta Khanna, founder of YakYak Global, a TEDx curator, reinvention strategist for individuals and entrepreneurs, and current President of Toastmasters Club of Singapore. Our theme this week is: why we’ve got to do better for girls and with International Day of the Girl Child on October 11th, we’re going to talk about why it’s never been more important to focus on real action that will ensure opportunities for the next generation of women. 

The Know Show is based on Andrea T Edwards Weekend Reads, and covers the climate crisis, Covid 19, topical moments in the world, global politics, business, social issues and passion/humor/history. Join us. 

#TheKnowShow #UncommonCourage

Unknown:

Welcome to the no show. My name is Andrea Edwards. And my name is Joe Gustin missing the third leg on this particular show is Tim Wade. And together we a show that's trying to make a little bit of a difference, making perhaps, I don't know general literacy more accessible or popular hopefully along the way. Our guest this week is Arista kata. She is the founder of Yang, a global TEDx curator, reinvention strategist for individuals as well as entrepreneurs. And she's the current president of Toastmasters club of Singapore. So we're going to introduce Arista, and have her introduce herself a little bit more, I guess. Yeah. Welcome. Hi, Rachel, you're on. Okay, cool. Hey, thank you so much. And thanks, Adrienne. And Joe, it's a bit like a deja vu, like it has been in the past. So good. And we're missing Kinga, apparently. But yeah, so I'm Alicia. And I'm mom, two twin boys that are 14 and a half now. And as you said, Yeah, I'm a TEDx curator, as well. And this past, you know, seven, eight years, I've done a lot of volunteering in this space in the you know, in the social impact space has been really, you know, one of my main interests and very intriguing a lot of things that I've learned things that I was never interested in, or didn't bother about, probably because of the upbringing that we've that we've had. But it's been different now. And, you know, exposure does different things to you, and makes you a different person. And that's, that's what I am today. And I see that, you know, kind of ripple effect, as I see with my boys now, which is why the topic today is so interesting. Yeah, and that topic, is how we can do things a lot better for for girls. And we'll come to that in a while as well. So the format is going to be really simple, you know, that there's one person, at least on the screen that I know for sure, is we keeping an eye on the views. And if this if this, this program is on track, and that's the person who's going to take you along right now to some of the news headlines. So Andrea, take it away. All right. No worries, this is all about the news that struck a chord with you this week. So and I know that Russia pays a lot of attention to the news. And it was one of the reasons that I really wanted her to come in to be part of this. She got she she's very well informed lady. So I always enjoy having conversations with somebody, somebody's got some feedback going on there with their sound. So originally, if you could turn your your your volume down just a little bit, you might have to listen a bit harder to us. But that's probably the feedback from there. Yeah, cool. All right. So sort of about the middle of the week, I don't know if you guys saw over the IMF or the International Monetary Fund, it came out strong, basically stating that the economic recovery has weakened in most rich nations due to the impact of both the Delta variant. And of course, inflation is now at risk. So they've cut their growth forecast in developed countries until at least the middle of 2022. And of course, the developing countries are going to be more severely impacted by these. We're seeing massive issues around the supply chain, which is leaving shelves shelves all over the world empty, rising food and commodity prices, which of course, makes life even harder for for the for the developing economies where they're already struggling. And then we've seen soaring gas prices across Europe. And I really want to understand why that's going on. I haven't I haven't read anything that explains it. So if you guys have got any thoughts, when we get to the end of this, I'd love to know, the great vaccine divide is basically what they are saying is causing the biggest challenges, especially in developing countries. IMF chief economist is a lady called Gita gopinath. Sorry, if I'm saying that incorrectly. And she's quoted saying, well over 60% of the population in advanced economies are fully vaccinated, and some are now receiving booster shots. About 96% of the population in low income countries remain unvaccinated? Well, when I saw that statistic, I was like, How can that be, you know, especially when you factor the population of China into it. But this is excluding China, because we know that China has vaccinated more than a billion of its people, even if it's just with the sine of x, which isn't that good against Delta, anyway, when it comes to and we'll talk about COVID in a minute, but we're all at risk with such low numbers of vaccinations around the world. And we will all be impacted economically moving forward. And it appears that we're now in a dance with inflation and economic stimulus by governments. And I think we should be ready for more news. We've talked about it before, October is the month that the major global financial collapses happen. So this is a sort of a big announcement to be happening in October. And let's see what let's see what comes up next. So Can anyone explain this gas scenario to me? Have you guys been looking at that story? Well, I must say I don't have an academic perspective on it. But I, I do know that what's happened is, you know, unexpected outcomes, obviously rain. So first of all, we had much of the prediction and much of the modeling being based on 80% vaccination in most developed countries, that was supposed to kind of bring and free of the economy, what Delta did because deltas are not factors so much higher or not, as the rate at which diseases passed on to the next person is so much higher than the original one virus. It is actually, you know, it used to be we used to use another disease as a reference and saying that was a terrible or not, it would be terrible if COVID-19 had this out on factor and that disease was measles. And they are not effective for measles is about five are not effective for the original one virus, between one and two are not for delta is between five and eight. So it really really changed the game, the plan, so a lot of things that were gonna happen, a lot of things that you're gonna anticipate for in terms of easing up of the economy, you know, all that just suddenly became unexpected is like if I unexpectedly wasn't going to be viable. So while we were, you know, looking forward and saying, Oh, it's gonna be quite likely that we can do this, and even, you know, Singapore, famously, who plans for everything. They were wrong for it by that as well, you know, the Delta varium made such a huge difference to everything. And the science also hasn't quite got to everyone. So people are taking pre Delta promises, and judging the politicians against the pre Delta circumstances. And, frankly, there's no way that you can, you can out with the science, the science is what it is, you can't you can't change what it is. But the policy and the expectations of the of the audience were not built for the current circumstances, they were built for the hope that they had built up before they had this problem. It's, it's a true I'm going to, I'm going to refer to a COVID article in The New York Times in a couple of stories, but it's so true. Like I've said it right from the word go, we have never outsmarted this virus, we've never gotten ahead of it. And we think we're smarter than the virus. You know, it's crazy, right? riester Yeah, no, definitely I'm actually agree with what you're saying. So the expectations of the public versus what they have thought and hoped for, and planned for obviously didn't mind. And that's why we've got this big thing. So there's a there's a big divide in here as well, the support for the current clients that are in place and what they're looking at and against them that they could really last plot and so on. But But then again, it was something which I guess no one even imagined or expected the level in the scale. And the fact that to combat it, and even fight it will be this much harder for jacinda Arden to actually turn around even now, pretty much I think last week, he mentioned that we're gonna have to learn to live with it really changed tactics and strategy completely. Because while it was early, I was happy because it was eliminated completely. And we're the only nation, you know, the America's Cup, right? Any of those, where else did you have that where everybody was celebrating without masks and big, huge numbers as if it was pre COVID. And there was New Zealand while we guys that we guys were all sitting here, right? And now they're in level four, down to level three, and cases are going up. So strategies have changed pretty much for the for the same reason. And as Joe said, this has been completely something which was, I mean, hear the word unprecedented resets and expected precedent itself. Yeah. But that that economic impact and Fallout that's coming as a result of it, I think, yeah, we're at the beginning of that conversation. And, you know, we've talked about in previous weeks, the global economists who predict the recessions they've been starting to speak up and the warning signs are there. So we're looking at some pretty dark times ahead and pretty, you know, we're going to be struggling especially in the developing parts of the world, and then the ability to rise out of these time, as well as the additional ramifications that the IMF have sort of listed you know, supply chain challenges all that sort of stuff. Yeah, we've got some hard times ahead. So I think people need to get ready for that and get their minds around that. Absolutely. So so that that mentality of absolute abundance in the developed nations and all that also needs to you know, be taken back along into reality check actually speaking and and you know, the the shared economy concept, which is being spoken about in in a lot of the younger generation, you know, in Japan like, like they're the ones who came up with that shared economies and shared this in there, right. That's coming up a lot more in conversations. Now, especially in the forums and you know, the TEDx youth forums and things, you can see that happening because as these announcements are coming about, you know, already, I mean, it's not rocket science for their, for the IMF to announce that you're going to have trouble, when when we can already see that so much has been on the quieter side, and so much has been stopped. And then, of course, there's got to be, you know, a disadvantage there for the entire globe. And of course, the the bigger head ones would be the developing nations or the underdeveloped nations. Yeah. That sounds promising what the US is speaking about in those forums. Yeah, definitely. I mean, they there's a lot more encouragement from that sector, I would say, it's a lot more vibe that is there, we can make it and we will make it it's just, you know, reframing your, your narrative, it's really reframing your your, your mindset and gender, the story that you want to pull through. And because of this, this, this, if we can work through these parameters and things, then we can start complaining and, you know, complaining is one thing, which is out of the window, finding solutions as well. There are other focuses, especially in the youth forums, and I, I attend a lot of the ones back in India as well, it is so interesting, because they are really, really out there and saying that, you know, the naysayers are going to go on and the vaccine, you know, divide as well, it's going to go on there, there's nothing you can do about it, whether it's because of the religious beliefs and faith that vaccination was wrong, or is because of other reasons, because it does what it does to your body. But irrespective of all of that, they can push forward with the positivity and, you know, make positivity louder and bolder and stronger. That's the kind of vibe that there is, at least in the much younger, I would say, the 20s and so on in the forums. And it's interesting. No, no, absolutely. We still don't have time for them to grow up to make the changes that we need to make. But it's very promising. One great piece of news this week that came out just to move on from from the economy. And I think that's going to be a story that's going to come up a lot more in the next coming weeks. But the US has rejoined the UN Human Rights Council, which reverses the Trump era withdrawal. And you know, that's because human rights are pretty important. So I thought that was a nice little piece of good news right into the mix that we just announced yesterday. Yeah, all right. Interesting. Yep. But anyway, I mean, yes. And that's that's reason for even putting this this topic out. And and I was listening to Lumineers session that we did earlier as well. It is it is so interesting. The question doesn't even arise where we're women or girls fit into the into the conversation. Yeah, right? Because it's the right thing to do. You know, people ask the why. It's really simple. And the only logical answer reasonable answer is because it's the right thing to do. And then you you have these conversations, because of why the numbers and why there is, you know, the women's forums and the women's entrepreneurial arm, you know, so many of the the, what should I say the women's networks and women's Commission's and women's associations and so on, right? Why is it we don't have that Now, like I was saying, you know, the men's forum for courage and the men's forum for other men's entrepreneurs, and some cheeky ones, which is, which is interesting, you know, they're right, male found are on the on the profile, the right, like, male entrepreneur. But the fact is that the reason that you need to call it a women's group or you the reason you need to call it, even women's entrepreneurs, network is because there's a deeper realization that it's time, you know, women have been the minority in these spaces, whereas these spaces really belong to everyone. So with the US going back on that, you know, signing back on and all it is going, it just gives him the space that Yeah, along with this, of course, women belong in the space where everybody else belong. And it's really, really very encouraging. tying the center, you know, this piece of news into the topic is very interesting. I hate to make a call about aesthetics of this particular moment, but originally, if you could tell your camera down just a little bit so that you're a bit higher up in the frame, that would be fantastic. I also have Tim Tim, saying that he will be joining us very, very shortly. I think he somehow got lost in the in the space for a while. on YouTube. Alright, so I want to talk about COVID. And we've already addressed it within the the economic thing, but there's a there's a fantastic article in The New York Times and The title is what the future may hold for the Coronavirus. And that's one of the things I loved about this is because it's just really straightforward. It's an article of fact, attracts the virus from the beginning, why it's spread, it's mutation and variants journey, why Delta became the dominant form even though it wasn't necessarily the best from a you know, that's from a viruses perspective, where we are now and where we're potentially going although obviously there's a lot that still unknown about that. When I read this article, it was one of those ones where I sort of sat back and finished it. And I just felt like it summed up everything that we've been talking about, you know, since we started the no show. I look around, you know, everywhere, especially in Europe, the northern hemisphere, even even friends and family in Australia, they can't wait for the lockdown to be over, even though daughters still very rife within their communities, we're all ready to get back into it and go to concerts and be with people, right. But the virus isn't done with us yet. And when you read this article, it's really very clear. And this is obviously even more so the case in those countries with very, very low vaccination rates, which leaves the door open to mutations. And those mutations could obviously spread around the world and the vaccines might not work. We don't know if the mutations could be better, or it could be worse. But the other problem, of course, is in in vaccinated countries like America, the people who were not getting vaccinated are living in clusters. So they are also at risk of spreading or generating a new mutant or variant. One of the statements by the scientists is we will reach an uneasy equilibrium with the virus, we will never extinguish it. But it will smolder rather than rage. And the other thing that they've recommended is that we should be humble when it comes to the virus. And I do not think that we have ever been even remotely humble. When it comes to the virus. We think we think we're smarter than it. And there's another fantastic article that I really want everyone to read. It was from my that my sister shared it, and it's called the pandemic speaks. And this is the virus speaking to us. So it's written in the voice of the virus, and it lists out 10 timeless truths of pandemics now and in the past. And it's a really brilliant, brilliant read. So have a read of that. But that article in The New York Times, I think it's unemotional it, to me, it's written like a virus. Viruses are emotional, they're not strategic, they just they survive. And it sort of just really explains the whole, you know, process of how it works. And I think it would be fair, even for people who haven't believed in it, and have been a little bit sort of, you know, you know, less reflective about it. I think this is an article that really sort of takes you on the journey of why we are, where we are and where we're going next. I'm just trying to imagine the accent that goes along with the voice of the virus. Where exactly it's coming from. I am bringing Mr. wade into the stream. about timing as we talked about the virus speaking that we introduced him where to this particular point. Hello, Hello, I am vitesse. Yeah, my name is COVID. My friends call me your guinea cough. Yeah, if any of you got any of you guys have a chance to read that one, The New York Times article. This has been an unfortunate week for me not not much reading going on lots of thinking and lots of banging my head against the computer screen. I've been I've been trying to do the stupid thing of replying to people who don't quite get what science is how science works. And, and some of my views are not as mainstream as required. Yeah, right. I've seen you I've seen you go into a few arguments on Facebook. Okay. And it's, it's brave to do that. I was I was having a discussion with some people today about arguing different types of arguments. And, and I was asking a professor, what his thoughts were not about the topic, but about how to place it in an argument. And the first thing he said was, actually, you need to establish whether they are agreeing on some baseline to which we can attribute evidence. Because if they don't agree that, that we should look at evidence and evidence can be something to argue with, then you haven't established the rules of the game. And you're going in there with different rules, somebody's playing basketball, you're playing football, and you're arguing over whether you can handle the ball. So so it's which makes sense, right? So yeah, if we can use evidence to, to make a point to argue, then, then we're gonna argue about the evidence, because otherwise they saying I saw this on this person who quoted somebody was a really good friend who's a doctor who said this, then it's just like, well, there's no peer researched anything on that one. So yeah, then then he just says, then you don't ever there's no point even starting to debate, which is frustrating. But yeah, interesting. First primary question, because it's not attacking anyone's point of view. It's just saying, what is the logical basis of a debate here? Which is understanding how to do that. So I shared a podcast that you are not so smart, and he does a fantastic Podcast, where he interviews a whole series of people on, you know, how do you have an argument? How do you talk to somebody who's in opposition to you? How do you how do you persuade, you know, and I think there's a whole skill set out there. And there's so much information about available around it. But I think, learning how to do that, and Joe was, you know, Joe was putting his hand up and say, I got I got it wrong, you know, and he shared something from the BBC and there was something in the article that was wrong. And then which then you then you put your hand up and said, You got it wrong. And I admire that. You know, I always say, I'm not out there to share my point of view, because I'm right. But I definitely don't want to be wrong. So that's what I work hard at not being wrong. That makes sense. I think just contextually I should I should very quickly explain the BBC thing because the BBC basically put out an article that talks about why bad science and made ivermectin the star miracle drug. And and a lot of the the the assertions was because the evidence that was used was very poor, the there was no proof, there was no a lot of a lot of stuff that they were saying was absent in the analysis that led to the conclusions that I bourbon fiber Mexican was any good, right. And the essence of the the, the take back that I that I that I put out in the end was the BBC article itself had been absent of any proof. It also it also lacked any of the rigor that it said was necessary in the actual reports. And it was a valid point there was, it was them saying, you know, there's there's no proof, but they didn't show enough proof that there was no, you know, one of those things. So, I had to I had to point that out, but it caused a lot of it caused a lot of angst. In some of my friends who were you know, a little bit more inclined to, to just want to know that there's a there's a slight problem with the whole ivermectin thing. And I just to be clear, I'm not team ivermectin, I'm not recommending it, I don't think it should be recommended. But at the same time, when you don't have the absence of proof that some things work, the absence of sufficient evidence that something works, does not mean that it also is bad for you. So people have to understand the difference between that. And the problem that we have with ivermectin mostly in the world right now. It's actually the misuse of ivermectin. If people thought that panadol, for instance, was going to protect you and kill you, in some significant way from COVID. And people were overdosing on that, then it would be a problem as well. But it wouldn't stop at all from being something that sort of useful, and then we get, we can sort of use it for part of this and heart of that, but it's not inherently bad. We just don't want to recommend it as the thing that's going to protect you from COVID-19. Without the medical basis to say yet, we're absolutely sure about that. I was using ivermectin with the rosemary on my chicken, Is that wrong? It's delicious. It's delicious. The wrong use of it. Yeah, but it makes the point, we all have to work harder for the information that we share. And we you know, peer reviewed research. And if it's not peer reviewed, make sure that you're explicit in sharing that it's not peer reviewed information, because people are operating at a speed of need for knowledge to confirm their beliefs. But they're not operating at the speed of science, which takes more time before those breaks can be confirmed. So it's on us to work harder for our knowledge. And just because it's on the BBC. And that's it. That's a site that I use every day. I love the BBC, because I find it quite neutral. But it doesn't mean it's always right. Yeah, there were lots of things that came out of that little discussion that I had with friends, which brought up things like who is an authority who is was qualified to say something, someone is a doctor, but they're not a medical doctor, they're just a PhD, or they say just a PhD. And anybody who's done a PhD goes like, What do you mean, just the PhD? Yeah, I think anyone has built up, built up a body of work over a long period of time, that shows that they understand the information that's being shared, is someone you know, and that's what we've got to choose, we've got to choose who do we trust, without information? Right? It's all about that, you know, I see I see people saying, Oh, you trust the science. And then there's all sorts of conversations around that. And then there's criticizing people to go and do searches on Google. Well, there's, that's called market research. And even though you might not technically have the title of a market researcher, it doesn't mean you're incapable of the skills that are essential to being a market researcher. So I think, you know, build up a body of work over time, build the trust of your community, show that you are more often right than wrong. And over time, you can build that credibility. So that's kind of the approach I've always been taking. I think the challenge that we face nowadays is people kind of trust you and believe you until Till you do that weird thing, right? usually something that's different from what you believe. So I think I think I have that same experience to be fair, a few episodes ago, I was telling you about Tony Robbins, right? For the most part, I think what he does is right. And then he comes up with his COVID stuff, and I go like, Okay. Oh, gosh, that was a big shock for me as well. And I was like, Dude, that was that was just so wrong. He just stopped stopped short of saying, you know, just just the wrong thing. But I don't know, if you don't know the same thing. But pretty much what he's talking about the call me they just didn't say I couldn't actually believe it. And I just, yeah, it's still quiet in those times, right? There is another. Sorry, no, I was just saying there's another big news story that's coming out around COVID. Obviously, we're coming up to the winter months in the Northern Hemisphere. And because most of the Northern Hemisphere was locked down last winter, there was no flu, no real flu virus going around. So flu season is coming up. And they're expecting it to be much bigger than it has been for a number of years because of the absence of it last year. And that means they're not really 100% sure which virus is going to be circulating. So they're basically saying if you get flu and COVID, your chance of dying is significantly higher. So if you're in the Northern Hemisphere, especially if you're in a country or a region that experiences significant flu out, or outbreaks, that would be something we're thinking about getting a flu shot. I've never had one that I can even remember. But yeah, so that's another story. Anything else you guys picking up on? COVID before we move on to the environment? I think we've been dead on that. Now for the last few, it wouldn't be wouldn't be news. But what I what I came across was something that was purported as news in the sense that it was marketing and sell as independent press. So it had a nice independent press II feel about the whole thing. And it was bravely addressing the stuff that wasn't the truth untruths. And the worst thing about it, for me was this title it gave itself which was 30 facts that you had to take along with you into the pandemic. And we just weren't facts, they were just, they were just fodder that that made it more possible for someone not to wear a mask not to vaccinate, there was less reason to believe that social distancing, and all those measures would work because these facts were kind of presented in a in a pseudo scientific way am I say so they looked at some things where they put some charts together and went and measured, you know, the differences between areas of the US that had a masked mandate was areas that did not have a mass mandate. And then the numbers didn't seem to make much of a difference. And it all came down to you know, the other thing is you can do with with statistics, and simply something like like a, like a pandemic, or like, like, like an outbreak, I said, if you look around enough, you'll find the curves that match up in order to match the story you've got. And the thing maybe also do is they will take some information, which was really being read the wrong way we can they have this, they have this curve that they showed rate of infection amongst the older people, and they just showed that that shape of the curve is pretty much the same, and then it crossed up, they've got really high, the end and all that kind of stuff. And it was supposed to show that it really didn't make much of a difference. And the real point of the data that they were trying to say was the proof that it didn't make a difference was that it's the area under the curve that tells you how many people died. You know, so if you had a higher point, it means a lot of people a lot more people died, but they didn't recognize that. And this this article came to me as proof that the proof of a counterpoint. And that was what was really quite scary for me as if people had what they thought was a science that was against the the mainstream view so to speak, you know, and that was what's really dangerous about it, people who thinks that they have the correct information and they think that they have the data to support this, this this information as well. And a lot of the view is seriously that they're there. They're so interesting that they they talk about the facts, you know, Marcin doesn't make a difference and a study in March of 2020 reveal this. And it's an article of September, September 2021. I go like Yeah, no, not not not the reference you want to use to prove something today? Yeah. Yeah. March 2020. was a little bit different to what? Yeah, yeah. Right. And then the spikes and so on. Yeah. Yeah, it's it's great. You can always find information to support your opinion. You can always find it. It doesn't necessarily mean your opinion. Correct. But you could it's Yeah, you can do it. Ma'am. data can be used to, to kind of completely support your perspective in any which way. Yeah, doesn't mean it's right. If it's not credible peer to peer reviewed scientific research, or depending on the topic, if it's not linked, so they can reference research. But if they haven't bothered to even link to the research that requires digging through so editors and sub editors taught me over the years, anytime you make a reference, or link to a reference sheet, you go to the reference and then if that reference links to another reference, you keep digging through the references until you get to the original. And that information in the original is obviously on, on on what's word. You skated. Yeah, oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Shit, I've gone completely blank. Anyway, the original research is often usually quite quite different to what to what's been touted a few links up up the chain. So it's a good exercise interpretations, right? It's interpretations of each person who's who's reading through and through, you know, a written piece and a research paper and stuff. But you interpret it differently, you use the same numbers to give a different viewpoint, and so on. And that's why changes, right, the same three or four different papers will come up with different outcome for you or for Joe and for myself, because we will think differently, and so on. That's really the point of view you're looking to make, right? Yeah. All right. So let's move into the environment. So there's a couple of, well, there's two stories, but one's one's a news story. And the other one's just a really, really fantastic article that I want everyone to read. So the first is the news story. I hope you guys saw this. Murdoch's News Corp, Australia, yet, has decided that the climate crisis is a thing, after all, all right. The newspapers in the Murdoch empire in Australia, once warned of a $600 billion cost from cutting emissions, and now they claim a $2 trillion benefit from doing the same thing. So that's good. But there's a lot of theory in Australia around this announcement. All the people who've been fighting for action on climate change are furious because Australia's lost more than a decade to change. But there's also a lot of greenwashing, too. And I really want to encourage people to look between the lines of what this means what the story means and read other people's opinions about it, not Murdoch media, because they're pushing for net zero by 2050 2050 is a long way away. What we need is action now, and in this decade, if we're going to have any chance of being able to overcome the crisis, it does have massive political ramifications. scomo and his team in the Australian Government are obviously running, running around trying to sort of reposition themselves to be climate carriers, you know. But of course, it could also have ramifications if it goes out into the UK in the US into the fox, Fox News and other mineral properties. And that means that the impact could be a lot bigger. So it's definitely a story to keep an eye on. But don't don't believe that Don't believe everything you read, that's all I'm gonna say. On the other side, there's a story in The Guardian. And the title is the climate disaster is here. And the words is here, underlined. And this is a beautifully put together article. And it's one, it's one of the great articles. It's kind of like that New York Times COVID article, just sort of basically stating the facts. But it's also very visual. So it's got maps that you can sort of scan through, and it's got lots of photos and stuff. So for people who prefer the visual information rather than written, it's a great, it's a great piece of reading. It covers four key topics for the climate crisis that impact us, heat waves, floods, wildfires, and crop failures. So these are the big four things. And what it does, is it explains each of these four categories. And what happens at 1.5 degrees, global warming two degrees, 2.5 degrees and three degrees. And it also puts the timescale of when those those increases are going to happen. Once we hit forward four degrees, global warming, where it's basically an unlivable world. For the vast majority of the world as it now stands. If we get to eight degrees, global warming, the cockroaches will just be surviving. But I want to remind everyone that 1.5 is when we move into too hot to live territory. And this is when many of the people who were living in the countries were that a major food producers, this is what they will be the ones who are most impacted. So it's so hard to leave, they can't go outside the you know, it's all about the way you sweat. And this is going to happen in the next six to eight years according to this article. They also took they also do scales of the once in a generation of events. So I'm married to an engineer So ever since I first met him, he's been talking one and 100 years one and a 20. Year One and 50 years of I've been listening to this language for Long time our grandparents experienced like a wildfire that we're seeing this year or a flood that we've seen this year, once in their lifetime our children could potentially be seen these events every two years. It's a really really brilliant article I really want just wish everyone could read it. A couple of people did read it until instead of responding to me it's so scary. Yes, it's really really scary it is but we need to come to terms with what's happening and what we need to do now is make sure it doesn't become as bad as what it could possibly be. By the time we get to 1.5 which is in the six next six to eight years, we're really going to start to see impact and we're not talking sudden change it's gradual change so if you look at the world maps of what's been going on with warming flooding everything it's been a gradual build up so we get it's going to be continue to be gradual that it's going to continue to get worse. So we need to stop that and limit that as much as we can. Did you guys have a chance to read that one? And I've only seen that yesterday and skim through it and totally totally bang on it is here so there it's very vocal and it's very it's not allowed and it's not really in your face and yet it's just stating it as strongly as I can that it's assigned to the thing is the ones that that can make the largest impact and the the largest influence I mean, they're you know, they're the weightage that they put on this versus the economic side of things right it's so different so to change that is the highest what individuals do on a on a day to day basis is different so it's really two different parts that the article is talking about. But again I mean the awakening and you know it's really come to push comes to shove and it's here Yeah, so pretty much yeah, I think we can see it right i mean when when we have plans like my dad sending images and things like can you imagine floods and in his his thing to me is I can imagine flies back in our hometown you know where I was born and he said, Oh, yeah, it was all the time we're here in Belgium. In here it's coming through these big gorgeous townhouses in Europe you know flash floods and so on. So it's pretty much every year to great article Yeah, I mean some of the I love I love the one I love it but I mean the way it's written as well as is very very clear the fact that over the century with 1.2 degrees over this last century, which is what's happened already there we're saying it it's cranking up the temperature of the entire globe this much within a little more than a century is in fact extraordinary with the oceans alone absorbing the best the heat equivalent of five Hiroshima atomic bombs dropping into the water every second and ours is like five Hiroshima bombs. I for some reason, I was okay with that. And then every second was like, That's amazing. I mean, it's like you know, imagine an attack where someone's just dropping it into the ocean five every second it's just relentless. That's what we've been doing we've been relentless as a species. Yeah. And at some point we need to relent i think i think the face leader the flip side of this is where you know we're the frog and in the water and it's been boiled. You know, the the the idea isn't very clear or isn't isn't quite easy to understand. Sometimes if you think about the frog thing, and we go like artists such as doesn't work. But if you look close enough, and all the details that were in that exact same spot we're getting we're getting used to the idea of temperatures rising, we don't see the violence that's happening, so to speak, and so we don't see the flame that's heating up the bottom of the pot, and that's your, that's your atomic bombs going off at that high intensity. And yet the change is gradual enough for us to go like yeah, this is this is okay, you know, I'm just thinking to myself about how when I was on radio in the 90s, and we started off the reason why I'm very, very, very much connected to weather forecasters, because it used to be weather forecasts every day. And it used to be ridiculous every day as we talked about Singapore's weather between 39 and 32. Or it was an honor on the overnights will be 2324. So it's not like it hasn't really happened Singapore now is it's significantly hotter and mmm sometimes when you see these things about global temperatures, you think Wait, Singapore has gone through quite a massive shift as well. 32 used to be a high 33 Okay, and now we hit 37 sometimes, you know, and then 3435 is a very normal thing so that that temperature change has very much arrived in Singapore. But at the same time as being the frogs that we are, we've just say no had more air conditioning and build bigger moles. I mean, I remember the first time I was I was working at Microsoft, so it must have been 2013 or 14. I remember, I saw my first drought in Singapore, and I couldn't come to terms with the drought in, in the tropics. And in since then there's been three more so just before the pandemic started, Singapore was in drought. Thailand as well for two years was in drought. And, like just just just that, for me, the the greenest part of the Earth is brown, like frightened, frightened to hell out on me, absolutely frightens the hell out of me. And people say they can't see it. You know, I was really I was listening to a climate denier who thinks that all the plastic in animals bodies oppose staged photos, and I might have you have you been to my Have you seen the beaches here? You know, every day there are people picking up so much trash out of the ocean. So it's not just that we're putting the atomic bombs into the ocean, we've also got these other crap, you know, 10 garbage trucks or minutes or something where the crap crap going into the ocean? It's everywhere. It's everywhere you look. Yep. And then, in fact, in the article, again, it's got like you're saying the infographics and the graphs in the article make make it quite clear. And I do. It is a valuable one to read. Yeah, it's a good one. Yeah, but the republican states, you know, if you're worried about the republicans getting their abortion law across the states, if you look at that map, they're all pretty much going to be wiped out in the next decade or so anyway, all the beginnings of that journey will begin. So yeah. worth fighting for? Yeah. All right. Should we move on to this weekend's theme? I can let me just find the banner. So can I just say one more thing about climate before we do that? Yeah. Did you see the article about the accusation against Brazil's President and body of crimes against humanity at the International Criminal Court for chopping down the Amazon. And that's good news. It's so it doesn't mean that it's going ahead as a indictment, but it's been filed. And, and that's making the news that would scare a couple of people. So the idea, of course, being that, that they've been putting gag orders on people, they've been removing people that are stopping the progress of the logging and everything else. And that's the stuff that's been listed in the particular article. So that one was in the Straits Times on the 12th of October, if you want to go look it up Brazil's bolsonaro, accused of crimes against humanity at ICC. So, okay, so that could also be the first case of eco side. Yeah, that's where we then mean that eco side becomes the fifth international law, right? Yep. That could be interesting. Okay, that's good. That's it's good news for lots of all of those legal claims against the petroleum industry, against governments for not acting, the children taking governments to court. They're all fantastic for moving forward in the future, because the courts are going to be a huge part of change, as we go ahead. Yeah, absolutely. All of that, and courts, policy, policymakers and things. It's just gonna keep shifting, though. It's gonna be slow. And it is, I mean, everybody's saying it all, all the folks, even at the UN un, the UN Women, when they came out, just I think in September, right, September 25, or something with that, it's, it's going to take time, so let's just face it, but it's not impossible. And it can't stop just thinking things that still slow and you can stop with all of this is gonna make a big shift. Yeah. So for those young people wondering what to study environmental law, I think we'll be good with some secure opportunities. Looking ahead. The other the other two, there are two other there's so many of the young founders that are using AI and tech to, you know, support the climate, you know, to to reduce the impact and see where you can slow down the, you know, the climate, the destruction that's been caused by certain processes around so a lot of AI now is being targeted towards that so interesting. One final piece on the environment. Prince Charles was interviewed in the BBC, and it's absolutely brilliant. It's written up on the BBC platform, but it's also apparently like the US 1951 year old Aston Martin is run by wine and cheese fermentation. So if you haven't seen it, we know, we know. We know he cares. We know he really cares about the environment and probably probably strongest statements yet. And then just today I saw a short video clip of the Queen having a conversation with a couple of people going there's a A lot of people talking but there's not always people doing. So the the royal family obviously gets caught 26 is going to be in Scotland, so it's on their doorstep. So yeah, so it's all coming. The means that we can get from Charles. Mummy, I need some more, I need to walk him in there, please the old one, the Aston Martin, stop the wine. run out of fuel. Lovely. Love it. Alright, so our theme this week is why we've got to do better for girls. So it was International Day of the Girl child on Monday, the 11th of October. And most people would probably be more aware of this actual event because there was this amazing storytelling project that happened around the hashtag this little girl is me. And I participated in it because Lavinia convinced me it was a very worthy thing to do. The pandemic has been brutal on girls and on women. We've seen alarming rises in slavery, which includes sexual slavery, adolescent girls are dropping out of education at alarming rates, and especially in the developing world have been so badly impacted, just not even being able to go to school. And there's an additional 10 million girls at risk of child marriage due to COVID. I could go on. I, for me, it's the key thing is a global crisis has shattered the world's ability to protect girls and to keep girls safe. And that is the tragedy. We haven't built a society that is strong enough to hold girls safely no matter what we say. So I'm going to hand it over to rich Arista, to help our audience understand why this is so important, because we've slipped back by a generation and why we must act? And to change this over to Donna Dhabi. Thanks, thanks. Well, like I said, at the very beginning, the very fact that this question arises, because the answer is very simple. It's really just the right thing to do. And the fact that there's so much talk about it or so much noise, as you know, some are saying and there's so much drama about it, and debates and questions and events and agitations some, you know, embarrassments even uncomfortable silences in the boardrooms, because these conversations keep coming up here and there, right? Not not just in, in the corporate setting, in your family settings. Also, there's embarrassment, and so on, when when you're trying to talk about these things, there's also unacceptable amount of, you know, really loud backlash as well, in some other settings. So there is a reason behind all of this, right. And that reason is that that sense of awakening, which has gotten stronger now that the world has gotten to a bit of a pause, right, the COVID-19 has obviously like you rightly said, It set us back in this particular segment, to quite a bit. And that that realization is we're settling on deep down, and that awakening that uneasiness, a feeling of you know, not being able to, to win in this situation, and working this hard to get to a place, suddenly you feel that you've gone backwards, almost 20 years with the progress that you had actually made, because of the situation that we were in, everyone's you know, tied up in their homes and unable to, you know, connect or get the support they need, get the protection they need, or so many other things. But yes, these days have to, you know, overturn and come back and like, it only happen with things like this, which is, you know, the International Day of the Girl child, which is also you know, the, the reason why it happens and the message behind observing this is because it's clear, girls are disadvantaged, and not really enjoying their, which I say, you know, the fundamental human rights, so to speak. And there's so many projects that are going on now, virtually, especially, you know, even if you look at, you know, one of the younger girls in who's doing the Sahara project in, in Africa, and she was saying, it seems like you know, we're all running this race and it seems like I'm I am, you know, all of my friends, you know, my girlfriends know, where the boys are running on two legs, we guys seem to be, you know, running on just the one leg, we do not have those resources, and things like that. So this hashtag movement that is happening now, which you were just talking about, that is really, you know, important because it's connected, like you said, the idea was to increase participation to increase awareness. And, you know, connect these girls to very regular everyday role models that if they could have done it, it doesn't have to be the most, you know, you don't have to be on the cover of the magazine and so on to be a great, you know, woman role model. But that's, that's what's kind of, you know, you know, the impact and the ripple effect, and that's why it's really important to get that hope that it can't be done. Yeah. I mean, educating girls is one of the Sustainable Development Goals and it's it's right way up top. So when you educate girls, they have less children. They get a sense, you know, obviously they stay in school longer, but they also get further their education, they contribute more to their societies, they manage their finances better, they have less children, which is something that we definitely need. So the benefits are just like, and in business when, when you have a quality businesses make more money, when when there's a quality in countries, the GDP goes up, like this, just there's no, there's no reason that we, we should still be where we are. And, and the fact that we've lost a generation of progress in less than two years, is unforgiving. It's completely unforgivable. I, it's, it's depressing. Very, very true. So I'm in this room, because the world as it stands today, what comes to mind, really, when you think of it, you know, the world in all its glory, and so to speak, it's been fast paced, and you know, this is massive digital transformation that has happened has been accelerated, obviously, because we didn't have a choice, right. And so there has been abundance, which which we could have seen enhancing, and yet, there's so much imbalance. So it really depends where you're standing and where you're looking at from that you can see a different picture. And that that's exactly where I saw education and getting that getting them to understand and for me in this big conversation one one on one of the women there that really spoke about was and I really aligned with that is we really need to bring men into the conversation and you know, have have men it's as allies, it's really not a battle anymore. It's time for networking, it's fine for collaborations and partnerships, the whole world is existing with that, whether it's you know, even its, you know, associations partnering with with others, but really remember the conversation, bring the young boys in the conversation, and so on. And then that's, that's what's gonna help accelerate back, you know what we've gone backwards. Because when that realization happens in the end that education not just for for the women, because one thing is, you know, educating the girls and letting them know that there is dreams that you can achieve, and so many other things, right. But also providing those resources for them to make it just telling them that these are your role models. And this is what it is, which is the first step is bringing them to a point where they know that they can make it. The second step is we need to bring that that support system around them. And which is why, like you said, educating on call really means a huge, huge trigger effect into the positive, which is bringing up so many other things. And it's something I always say, equality isn't. It's not a women's issue. It's a human issue. And men win, too. But we've got two dads here. You've got a daughter, anyone I have for your four daughters. I had three daughters and a son. And now I have four daughters. It's gotten that complicated in my world. But yeah, four daughters. And then Tim's obviously got one little lovely lady. So what do you what do you guys make of all of this? You've got Okay, well, I'll start in terms of in terms of like, feeling that you don't have something or you feel that you have a disadvantage. I've got to say, my kids have never had that sense. I've never, I've never felt that they were behind anything. And, you know, I live I think, you know, having lived in Singapore this time, and I was I've often looked at the the management structure in the company that I that I dealt with the most media called at least the radio side of it, we were actually very heavy on women. So in terms of the balance and stuff like that, I never really felt there was that particular kind of disadvantage. And they were occasions Actually, I felt disadvantaged as a guy, you know, there were certain things that I felt you don't we know, when we're when people are trying to balance things off, you can be on the receiving end of of that and go like, what Hang on, you know, like equality, equality. For instance, for me, one of the issues was that equality is about, you know, looking at the best people for the job. And because of corrective measures, what will happen is sometimes you will have to the assigned work, client will tell me that, oh, we would love to work with you, but we need to balance it off. So we're gonna, we're gonna hire a woman to be in your place. And for me, it was always a bit of a mixed thing for me, because on one hand, yes, good that we're doing this. And on the other hand, it's sort of like if we're doing a, if you're doing an arm wrestling contest, right? You don't really want to have a fair contest. And it's all kinds of there's all kinds of things wrapped up in that. But it's a it's a, it's a it's a hard thing. Talk about balance and stuff. But But again, as far as my daughter is concerned, I don't have a concern about them being disadvantaged. And I think for me that the big challenge really is how do I strategically empower them to, to climb a different kind of ladder. I think the ladder has changed over time, in terms of what what what it represents to the what what kind of data society presents you to climb, and how you climate changes. And, and for me, I'm trying to, I'm going to help them change help them climb that, that as best they can. But but not not not much of a problem for me, I think, for me, anyway. Interesting icon here, Andrea? Oh, there you go. Just sorry. I was just saying. Education of girls is something that's a real crisis around the world. Yeah. Singapore is obviously it educates its children and its education system is world class. So the kinds of the countries that are doing well by the girls are often in, they're incapable of understanding the bigger crisis that happens around the world, because they're doing everything that they can. So even from your perspective, so the way you see the future for your daughters, it's it's from a in a country where it's, it's pretty good. You know, there's a lot of opportunity for women, a lot of women in senior ranks. I don't know Singapore, I mean, it's never in the top 10. But no, Philippines is the country in Asia, that where the women rank up higher, which, which is surprising, because we're probably right now, that's not the case. But so there's our, our experience, so I'm raising boys to be gentlemen to be respectful towards women. But then there's the bigger perspective that that's beyond us. And it's about how do we help influence that being changed, doing the best we can within our families? Because I think that means we we contribute adults out into the world, you know, that are good people. But what about the biggest The biggest challenge is, you know, that, that will help the world move forward in a positive direction. And I was on a producing a panel the other day of for diversity and inclusion. And you know, that that's the exact thing, you know, that the Singaporean participant really had not much of a feeling of being disparaged against. And they felt very confident going into other areas. And in fact, there was a whole interesting thing about what happens when someone from Sweden shows up in Singapore, and they become the minority. You know, it was it was it was quite interesting. So you can be completely Yeah, you have you don't have the context, you don't have the feeling about it. And you really can't imagine until you're actually showing it, that there is a different kind of problem somewhere else. Yeah. Yeah. So maybe we need to maybe we need to make sure that that that light has been shined enough or in a bigger way. And then Tim, what do you think? Yeah. I think from, from a young girl's perspective, in developed countries, I might, my feeling is that they're fed this there seems to be parity. But I don't think that that's showing necessarily in the top jobs in organizations, actually. So I think it goes down at level, and then the excuse that everyone will give Well, it will be that the women went and had kids. So that's, that's understandable. But then that's, that doesn't make any sense. Really. I mean, it makes some sense. But it you know, we're seeing Prime Minister of New Zealand managing to have kids on the job. It's, it just seems to be a dismissible a reason that allows an easy dismiss of pursuing it, were actually if people looked at the data, they might find some, some reasons to make some decisions internally, and to make sure that the opportunities are there. I so so that what that means, then, is that on the other side, in the less developed countries, where, where traditional structures operating perhaps more than some sort of egalitarian model, whether that's at home or in, in rural areas, or even, even in, in the main, the built up cities, you were going to see a bigger, bigger difference. I mean, you know, you can say the developed cities in the Middle East that definitely do not have gender equality. You'll you'll see that in, in lots of different parts of the world. So I think it's something that's happening everywhere. And but I but I, I think it's more pronounced in those less developed places, and the awareness is possibly more felt by the women. They're understood in the places where it's not as In the built up places, but nothing's happening to help those people in the poor places, if that makes sense, not enough is happening. Yeah. And COVID COVID. what COVID has done is it is, it is, it's been a pressure cooker for the difference. So, again, the kids in Singapore aren't feeling it massively from a pressure cooker perspective, but they certainly are in places where their income has been severely impacted. And the household has made a decision based on income as to who goes to school, or who needs to help out. And so that's where it can really be detrimental. Yeah, in a lot of the developing countries, I mean, we can't imagine it, but that's when a parent, you know, if they've got five 610 children, and there's no money, and somebody turns up offering to buy a child, you know, that's a sacrifice that you make for the entire family. And that's why sexual slavery increases, you know, because people are so desperate. And we can't imagine ever having to make that choice. But people make that choice every single day. So, you know, what can we do? We need to we obviously, we, I mean, I'm, I'm paying attention to it. I know, Tim, in Russia, you're paying attention to it? I don't know. I don't think it's in your that's not really what your focus is. But, you know, what do we do? How do we how do we get people to understand this, because it's the solution to so many of the world's problems is, is to helping the girls rise? How do we do it? What more can we do? Oh, sorry, go ahead. I was just gonna say something about what both of you said and Timmy I resonate with you by Joe as well, exactly as you're saying, for me as well till I reached, you know, in my 20s and got out of you know, Indiana was in New Zealand and is the first time I actually realized gender was wasn't my thing to be concerned about. Because even my home in, you know, the middle income group or the the above middle income group and things like that, it really gender is not an issue. So India being a developing nation, and as of now, it's really, it's, it's, it's very, very different in different socio economic, sex sections. And culturally, it makes a huge difference as well, depending on where you are and what your upbringing has been, and what, what the reasoning is behind that as well. So for me, there was completely no difference at all. So for me, it was a complete new learning or it really like when when they would ask Is your brother, because I've got two younger brothers are pretty young system, we, you know, my folks were really very particular to make sure that if you want to get into, get into television, go on your education, higher education less, or whatever you want, you can do. So there was, I mean, there was no difference whatsoever, my generation, my my parents generation, and so on, but that's how it has been. But that's not the case. If I step out of my home and look left and right, that isn't the case. So Joe, where you're coming from is actually right, as well. And Tim, what you said is true, as well, but these are just perspectives in smaller bubbles. And even in Singapore, for that matter. Tim, you rightly said, so, you know, it's it's equal apps at certain stages, you know, secondary school, get a college and all, and the numbers started window as as that quality of jobs, you know, the numbers and exactly, or pregnancy, and so other reasons and so on the top jobs, or the upper middle management level jobs, they don't get there, but why, you know, what, what is the thing behind it? How did we get to this kind of, you know, the distance imbalance in almost every, you know, part of the parent world, whether it's the developed nation or not, to say one thing in the developing countries, of course, is a huge need. But the bigger and the louder voices are in the developed nations. I mean, if you look at the the SDG index, which is, you know, their their growth reports, right, for the 17 development goals, sorry, the 17 SDGs, which is out there, the slowest one to grow is Goal number five, which is to women and girls, which is really quite sad. So go women fit into every single was all 17 of them, because that that's what women that we say, as human beings, and they are in every space where there is this there's a man that there's there's a woman right, in any family or any arena, right. But specific to that goal, that we should have seen much, much higher growth. But Goal number five women empowerment, that is the slowest one to grow one of the slowest ones to grow. And that's that's something to talk about. Why is it that it's been like this, so many, many, you know, like under you're saying that there's so much corrective measures being done. There's a lot being spoken about yet. I think culturally and it's being recognized and established now by by, you know, all those activists and the women who have these associations who've started and champion causes and stuff that it is going to take time, it takes time, because it takes time to change your mindset, even just to go, you know, do to have a change, you know, your your dinner menu for your grandfather in your home, even that getting used to a completely different thing would take a while, you know, you take a week or so, or take a month for getting used to a different style different routine. But to get the globe and the planet on board for something like this, which is different, you know, culturally in so many different places, and it's gonna take time, because it's not easy to change that mindset. But that doesn't mean it's not possible, we just need to find ways to accelerate that. And that education, which is seeping down now in, you know, at least in the developing nations as well, is making a big huge difference. And it is making a big impact. But the decision makers and the policymakers are all the others, which are a different generation. And that's where the gap is. So what we want and what we understand that the younger generations, whereas the the execution is in the hands of the policymakers and decision makers, often different generation and gender. That's right. Even even the United Nations, you know, like their, you know, the President, there's only been four female female presidents and yet and not a single, you know, Secretary General, which is female, even as of now, in the last how many years? Seven, eight years. Yeah, but that also could be female intelligence, because he'd want that job right. Well, I think I think there's a thing that we sometimes maybe not accepting of as well as their seasons for things to happen, right. And, and, you know, like, like, if we think about if we take away gender as one particular aspect of it, just talk about profiles of people who are sort of in charge and wealthy and sort of, you know, in the limelight, you know, take take, take intellectuals, people who are like the geeks, right? And think about it back in the 50s or 40s. And their role in society and how they were viewed and how they were they were there, you know, you in terms of status, and there's a belief status, they were the they were the lowest status, and how that's kind of evolved and changed that now. So that geeks are kind of who eventually are ruling the world so to speak, right for now, for now, this is the season of the geek. I think there's something happening with that for women as well. And every single group actually is trying to advance its its role, its position. And you know, if you think about, there's so many women in the world, and why has it come to this place? Where are we right now, I mean, part of that. As much as we don't want to say that it's about things like rearing children and having families that is also that is still part of it as in like in terms of priorities, it's it's the geek, it's just the geeky priority, you know, I want to be I want to be a mom, I want to be a dad, I want to be a good parent. This process is what I'm what I'm going to be this is part of who I want to be, and this is the this is the kind of price that I'm willing to pay along the way. You know, like if, for me, for instance, if I were to drop out of my radio career just to pursue my modeling career, because I was so passionate about that particular thing. People would say well, you know, yeah, okay, well he sees first of all has no chance but secondly, though, he will he would have he would have decided to pay a price for that and he would have jumped out of it and we would not expect that if I came out of that two year or three year hiatus that I would jump back in and and not be stagnant with it the I wouldn't I wouldn't be expected to have jumped forward as well in my in my radio career. So I, I have I have a little bit of a problem with this, this this again, this cherry picking of situations right where we want people to take on everything and say okay, well we should be able to pursue a career and have a family and never pay a price for it. And I go well, maybe maybe there has to be something about that maybe you have to think about putting off your your child rearing too much later in your life and and if you really want to do to build a career compete everybody else then stay in the race all the way through, you know, it's not like, I mean, it's not like motherhood itself has no rewards. It's not like it's something it's something that that that people don't gain something from I mean, people lose through it as well. It's a price to pay fair enough. But at the same time, it's also something that they wanted and gained from it. So it's a mix I feel, I feel sometimes there is too much anger around it, but I go like yes, but if you if you just you If you just balanced everything off and put a price on everything maybe it wasn't as bad I do I do feel that I'm gonna jump in a little bit on this one without you saying motherhood and you know you've got to have the balance it's the same thing Same goes for fatherhood and I'm going to take this a step backwards as well because I was you know a bit which I'm not generally with vocal on certain things you know for example teen pregnancies what was initially that comes to mind when you talk of teen pregnancies what what do you if I say teen pregnancies what seems what comes to mind a young girl Do you ever think of the boy because pregnancy is not is not a women's thing? It's not a women's issue we just we just a means and they and that's exactly so when when there's a teen pregnancy it's really offensive that you only talk with a girl she gets some shame this she didn't get pregnant by herself. She gets she needs to drop out of school and you and you'll be surprised but Uganda has passed a law I'm sure a lot of mothers had as well that the boy needs to drop out of school as well because it's not fair it's just not fair so it's the teen pregnancy the focus is on the girl but you're forgetting and the focus on the shame is on the girl which equals shame and focus should be on the boy because the pregnancy is not agenda pregnancy is pregnancy you just knew the womb is with a woman but it's the it takes to to create a baby and to to raise and take responsibility for that baby so the goal is to draw on a school so sought as the dead and you know whether it's two children that need to drop out of school and two families that need to look after that that particular teen pregnancy so now that that those laws have come in the naming and shaming like the it was never asked who the boy was that got the child pregnant or an adult that got that girl child pregnant in teen pregnancies right now it's changed so this they call out the boys thing so that it's a deterrent for others early you could get away with it now that the age even in the US our teen pregnancies teen it's all about the girls and you know your your start shame all those things that But hang on I mean you have all these stats of you know 16 or 16 and under there's there's like 73% of girls who are sexually active 15 and under and so on. After with who are themselves why are we not talking to the boys are there activities like, you know, 85% of the of the boys that are under under 15 inactives actually, and that's what creates this entire issue. So the focus being so much on the teen pregnancies, immediately comes to mind that's the girl that's been sent out the village earlier on now it's the dropout from school, especially the developing countries, nothing to the boys whatsoever. But that's challenging because just like you said, it's a balanced motherhood and almost the same balance for the fatherhood. And so when when you when you decide to have a family, the family doesn't have agenda. The pregnancy doesn't have agenda. It's a child right and you bring it together you do you take a joint responsibility so that mindset and and I can see that you know, it's it's a it's a big one so big step even even for me myself, you know, because that's what got me intrigued and brought me into into this space in a bigger sense of the default server and everyone thought of it and didn't see it happening in my family or anywhere else. My mum was free to do what the hell she wanted pursue degrees, even after raising three kids and stuff, there was no issues. But at the same time, yes, because it's a mindset. We've never thought of it differently. And this happened actually at a keynote event. Andrea, you'd be surprised. So one one speakers was a close friend of mine at one of the keynote panels. She when she got off stage, we were having a chat. And then she went off to get some food and her husband came over. He's a professor at NYU. And he was he was talking to me. And so something about again exactly what the material was mentioned as well. That you know, it's a balance you got to make a choice you want to create you want a family, you want a baby and I'm like, no Hang on a minute. And this is a really senior guy. He's moved from the US and he's I don't know what the fuss is all about you, you women, you guys are better at the job and so on. I said, Look, of course it is it's a natural tendency, and yes, it is so but it's all about having the opportunity to make a choice and say no, that I do not I'm one of those. I mean, I do enjoy occasionally in the kitchen and it's completely it's completely hard. So if I can make it my husband's got to do it. And so and which is which is as we go forward, but it has not been there and I can tell you a Singapore's right up there in this mindset. And it's been very, very quiet in the space of women empowerment and we've seen that in mode on multiple occasions multiple years. It's only just getting to recognize women in Singapore on on a bureau on a different level of equality and things like that. But the the cultural thing which is also back in Indian resort and back in so many of the Asian countries as well. So even though you want to have that and To say that women can't have it all at the same time, but men can. So it's now in the 21st century, it really doesn't make sense when you've got everything at your disposal, and you've got everything it was, okay, 300 years ago, 200 years ago, and so on. And you can see it in so many different speeches by so many women who have the data and the stats, you know, around that. But changing that mindset, exactly what you've said, it kind of raises that question, why do I need to have that balance? It kinds of gains get to borderline of being you know, hang on a minute, right? Yeah. So one of the things that I so many things you just said and they're absolutely spot on. But this idea that the cost of child over having children should be borne by women in today's world know that traditional the, to me, it's so traditional. But the other thing is the lifetime of a woman and the lifetime a manatee different things, right. And what's happening at the other end of the lifecycle is women, women living obviously, usually outliving their, their husbands, but that, but they're experiencing deeper and deeper poverty into old age, because the way that we work, and the fact that women are punished for delivering the next generation of citizens in every country, is a punishment in the future. And now we've got a whole bunch of women who are saying, I don't want it. I'd love to see some stats where women who choose not to have children at all do that, are they even better off than women who do have children. But you know, at the end of the day, we can create, it's about rethinking something new, like for both men and women, right? it you know, for men to be taken. And, really, I mean to, for for some of the groups I completely disagree because they really loud and say, we need to do this. We know the why the women why the men can't bother. I mean, give it a break. It's something that they've been used for hundreds of years. And so we we used to what do you start with a man I mean, so so the women used to not every woman wants to go out and do all of those things that are the women are fighting for, let's carry on. So many women are happy to be in the home with the family and take those 10 years off, and then restart and rethink have an easier career. Well, Amanda, and that's perfectly fine. We're talking about having the choice. And that's all having the tools and the resources with us. And that's all. So it's a different conversation. It's not a battle and a fight and nothing, but it's just having at least having that access to those resources and things so that you can make a choice and create the balance that you need to or if you want to. Yeah, so I'm just always gonna jump on to the next section. But it looks like Tim's ready to chip in, he thinks something. Well, I was I was thinking, obviously, there's a big cultural undertone, to how different societies will operate. And what's been happening in the past tends to continue. And, you know, if you want to go back far enough, a lot of this probably stemmed from warfare. And that if the men would charge in, kill all the men in some village, and take the women and, you know, and that would be part of the plunder and all this sort of stuff. And so these sorts of dynamics would be happening. And then, if we come to today, you what you just said then, was interesting, because, because, because some people will be going, Yeah, I'm happy to stay at home looking after the kids and I prefer it and this and this, and this, is it, does that mean that some people are going well, you're probably going to do that, therefore, I'm not going to waste money educating you, because you're probably going to do that. And then you get caught in this cycle of whose choice is it. So what you were just saying was, we got to give, we got to make the choice available to the woman to choose, or the man to choose, you know, to stay at home and do all that stuff. And, and so then, presumably, at some point, we'll talk about the three things I scribbled down were education, which everyone seems to be going Yep, we shouldn't have equal access to education, access to income, which is the one where once they get out of the school system, or even in the school system, but once they get out of it, access to income becomes a determinant of behavior. If I can't access income independently, and I'm dependent on someone else to access income, then effectively they control me absolutely control. Yep, and then and so from that perspective, it would seem to make some sense to invest in business skills for women, as well as leadership skills but business skills to help them run their own business and to be self sufficient from an income perspective, regardless of how big that is, and that will serve them in corporate but also serve them in running a small business and, and then from an awareness perspective, just from children's safety. So want to so I'll try and make it as short as possible to to people I spoke to that I think would will really enjoy conversations and I think they're on YouTube. That is these conversations I have on YouTube was Nikki, me who is a British British woman who lives in Australia. And while she spent time in Australia and Cambodia and runs free to shine, which is a women's young girls Protection Agency, and well, it's more, they protect the girls by informing the villages to keep the girls in school. Because when they're out of school, that's when they get picked up by the sex traffickers. And the sex traffickers aren't stupid, they don't turn up and say, Can we buy your child, they say we can offer employment. Yeah. And that the employment starts with in the city, and they bring to the city and then they move slowly, closer and closer and closer to the red light districts, at which point, then they come in, some are just nabbed and thrown straight into it. But others go through this sort of desperation, and then being in an environment where it's it with where it seems to be okay. And then they're in. So it's, it's just sort of chipping away at at the the grandparents think they're working in the city, or wherever it was that we usually the grandparents, because the parents are out working, and the grandparents are at home. And if the girl is not in school, then she's at home, and then the idea is going work. And when there's offers there, that's what tends to happen. So what Nikki and her team do, is that they make sure that the girls have good access. And the grandparents are educated the parents of the village, they take the whole village, and they inform the village to keep them aware, then they they're, they're also keeping the girls in school. So they're fighting to keep the girls in school that the girls in school, she's going to get the education, and she's going to be out of this, she's not going to be sitting at home where the parents go, yes, you know, go and go and take the job. Because if she's, if she's not in schools, then she'll be expected to go and work. And that's where the danger can be. And then they do things like just simple things like providing them with the money for the school uniform, that can keep them in school, or the textbooks that can keep them in school, because without that they're not allowed to go or the bicycle to get them to school and back without getting pinched. You know, so that was one person I talked to a really interesting conversation. And the other one I talked to was Janine Lee, who's a kiwi, who now I think lives in Australia was she was living in Australia when I was speaking to her. And she is an ex police officer from New Zealand, focusing in what from a homicide perspective, but also domestic violence became a passion. And she offers counseling, and also salting from a debate domestic violence perspective. And the reason that conversation happened early on in COVID. was because my expectation also talking with Andrew about it, one of the the big challenges of COVID. And what that was going to do for the next two from a domestic violence perspective, particularly in households where domestic violence was already happening. But as Andrea said, In last week's called, in, in households where the pressure of that started to see domestic violence for the first time, and, and just the, Where, where, where women are impacted in, in particular from a domestic violence perspective, out of COVID. And I mean, Andrew, you you had this idea of just removing them incompletely, which was a really interesting idea. And, and then I was having a look at a study from there was a study from I'll tell you who the study was from in just a moment. But they were asking girls in various different parts of the world plan, plan International, I think it was. And this is just possibly the vision for the better world that was saying post COVID do you think it's gonna be better? And they're asking a group of girls and give you the numbers, but there was there was over 7000 girls in in all around the world that they're asking these questions from, and the most optimistic in worldwide was Latin America. And, and Asia Pacific, believe it or not, and then post COVID was going to be great. Africa was the one that was most pessimistic. and North America, weirdly enough. But so so I think that, and it depends on the study. And it depends on the question. It depends on how it's been framed, and it depends on a whole lot of things. That the challenge of COVID if we get if we're back to that, that question of how COVID is impacted this in a in a really interesting way. I think primarily the biggest impact is possibly going to be access to income. I think in the in the income impact on decision making in pork communities as to who gets the benefit out of a large family of 10. And who's got who's, who are they going to put their resources in, because they've got a resource crisis in a sense. And, you know, I was chatting with a fellow that was, what a guy that I knew who's been as like a nomad made all his money and various Stock Exchange and everything else. And it's currently him and his wife are traveling around Africa, Northern Africa, and the Mediterranean, basically, Northern every side. And they say, they got to Tunisia, or Algeria, where everybody had COVID. And they got COVID there. And they sort of got on with it and kept traveling. And they were talking about their experience of traveling through COVID. But actually what I was thinking about as I was reading that because it sounds irresponsible at one sense, and it sounds interesting in another sense, but what I was interested in in some of his commentaries of people couldn't afford afford the test kit. They couldn't afford to get tested. And just that financial pressure, something that we see is so inexpensive as just the test, you know, it cost them $39 to get on a plane, because they got tested 39 bucks, and then they just waited a while and then flew somewhere else. People couldn't afford that. So it was stopping freedom of movement was stopping opportunities. And of course, the octane impact that Andre, you see very real in a very real way, in Thailand, is is that that income loss. So I guess that was just what I wanted to contribute at that particular point is the various aspects from Cambodia to domestic violence to do income inequality and income decisions that people having the right. Yeah, and I think the final thing is just, you know, looking ahead, you know, when automation and robotics and all that stuff, artificial intelligence, when it really comes into into play, the way we live and work is going to fundamentally shift and that's an opportunity as well for for making sure that we get it right. And for the real sense of equality. You know, we will have choices, universal basic income, all that sort of stuff. But let's let's go into what's what's what's some of the other news items that have captured your attention this week? space. All right. Yeah. I find it so hard to watch that stuff. Now shout in space. Anyone? Yeah, Captain Kirk. face. It's a good news story. It's obviously he's 19 years old. What I like about it is he's 90 Yeah, I'm sure 100% of marketing 100% and, you know, Amazon doing a great idea. Because basically, who do you want most to go into space? It's people with lots of money, and not much in terms of expectations beyond that, right? So you're looking for a, someone who is an icon is going to activate I think a lot of old, old timers and saying, You know what? Yep, that's what I always wanted to do. Now, I can see that 90 year old out there, I can do it, too. Yeah, yeah. That's it, you know, you know, my field. I love space, I went to NASA, it was brilliant. You know, it's the universe is amazing, right? But we've got to sort out Earth. I get it. The one of the one thing that's supposed to make a huge difference, and it's been it's been reported by the less than 300 people who have gone up, right, is that every time someone goes up there, they realize how important it is to look after the earth, you know, and there might be something in there in terms of excursions, right. So to try this gift to go like let's this this, let's have a look at this, that understand what this is about. So you can see what this is about. You know, I don't know whether there's a way we can we can we can do that, too. I mean, I think I mentioned it before, but that's probably the way you can do that you can figure a way for artists to create experiences truly immersive, real emotional experiences that can help people to feel that feeling, they can do something about it. And I was just thinking about the big problem that we're all facing is that we're trying to be unnatural. You know, all we're doing now talking about the environment, trying to balance things trying to give equal rights and stuff and all that if we were to allow ourselves to be natural, completely natural, we would fall into the animal state with the alphas we would you know cells out of existence because that's what happens in animal kingdoms, right they be there, they're in an environment, they they they pillage the habitat and then they die out. What we're, what we're struggling to do right now is to be unnatural. They're trying to use it. intellect, planning, thinking, all that kind of stuff to rise above the limitations of our most basic selves. And that is really the challenge where we're trying to intellectualize the entire planet so that we go like, okay, we can be better than who we truly are, you know, just just yesterday, we're just talking about what social media is, and what's wrong with it. Social media is terrible, because it allows us to be our worst, in the easiest way, you know, and I know, you know, it's precious space for you at real, but I do feel that more people are just been terrible, because it actually empowers that terrible behavior. It doesn't create new bad behavior, it actually just allows the most base behavior to come out without much of a filter. So that's the big challenge where how do we how do we, how do we succeed despite ourselves, how do we decide that, you know, I want to have this, but I'm going to let this be for somebody else. And I decide that I'm scared of the vaccine, but I'll take it for my benefit. But for somebody else's benefit, which, frankly, I find very few people who are actually doing that a lot of people are motivated by very simple things, I want to fly I want to eat, I want to go to a restaurant, all that I'll take the vaccination, thank you very much, you know, it's tough. Captain Kirk went to space. Yeah. Sorry, sorry, if I can't get excited to receive any news that you sort of just just gonna add, you know, what, what, again, come back to Joe, because, you know, when he's on the internet, we're using intellect to kind of you know, fix things and try to see that we can make a bigger and better but we need to, I mean, the natural what the natural should have been, and you know, would have survived and the power would have worked as the animal life does, they go into these spaces, and there's, they don't break that that cycle, right of nature, the, the ecological system and so on. But why we need intellect to fix it is because we've used that same intellect to destroy it. And we've used all of that in a smarter, smarter than ourselves, tech and all of that, that thing that we thought was actually brilliant. And man's made like big giant leaps with discovering plastic, and industrialization and whatever else. And we didn't see what extent of harm could be sitting literally within just decades, and we didn't know and we using all of that. Now to reverse it. I mean, there's there's no other way of going and waiting naturally. And thinking back when systems have been set in place, human beings have gotten comfortable in a certain style, you know, in a certain lifestyle, at a certain pace of really this fast paced, everything's at your fingertips kind of thing. Now, to revert to that in a natural cycle, you're going to wait, you're going to look at disaster and not time. So you got to put in processes and intellect in place really, to stop and reverse, either reverse or not, but definitely to try and slow down that and you know, they there's so many different perspectives exactly like like we're all discussing about whether it's vaccinations or climate, like use a climate action, plan control, climate change, but there's so many different perspectives and different things. Empowerment means different things in different areas, right, in different parts of the globe, it means different things to different people. And same same goes for climate and what innovation is and what disruption and how bad it is, it really means different things to different people. So the pace is naturally very different. But the reality out there is now I think it's coming down faster and a lot more blogging out there a lot more video logs out there, folks, we're talking bigger picture, that if we don't get in there, all of us together, it's not gonna make a difference. So really, and we can't we can't forget the Sorry, I muted you before because I think it's, there's something coming back from your computer, but when you you know, different perspectives, I totally agree with that. But there's a the the vast majority of the situation that we're in has been created by a smaller group of countries, it's impacting, you know, other countries, you know, you're looking at these, these landfills full of fast fashion in Africa, the rivers of plastic, in many, many countries around the developing world, which is Western waste being dumped. You know, so and earlier, you sort of said these things take time change takes time. We're actually at the point where for the very first time, we haven't got time, down down. We had we had time when we first knew about this 30 4050 years ago. Now we've got to move we're going to accelerate we're going to do it as quickly as we can. One of the interesting articles I read this week on top of everything else, another one that my sister shared is Australia is not actually an evil dictatorship. I just thought you guys might like to know that. So apparently there's a whole bunch of far right groups not in Australia outside of Australia who basically taking the videos of these freedom freedom protests in Australia and their editing and making them look like Australia has turned into this police state where you know, the protests are getting beaten up. And they're also now moving into working out where the protests should take place so that they've got the best angles for video footage so that the coverage is even better and more powerful. And then this has been then fed into these fire right? underground networks and people think Australia's turning into an evil dictatorship so I'm presuming that the territory was Tourism Authority of Australia wasn't too heavy about this that was pretty interesting. So that's what that's the latest thing that got my attention. I think it's I think it's I think it's too complimentary of the people running Australia at the moment that there would be an evil dictator Yeah, I suggest that they're actually in control and power and that they've got a plan potentially all the potential dictators in the last few years they haven't really been the smartest guys on the block rat No, they like like sitting there stroking things. Yeah, exactly. themselves second, all right, so let's wrap it up with what's keeping you distracted at the moment I have gone back to something very old and is in three by four from ads I'm watching the Garry Shandling while Larry Sanders Show it's it's by Gary San by Larry Shandling it's one of those shows that when I was young I knew about and i and i and i watched that I thought I don't see a real big deal to all of this but almost every comedian of note that I've heard talking about comedy in the last 1020 years keeps referring you know to the Larry Sanders Show as his amazing show. So now I'm watching it and trying to do to pick up what I can from it in terms of why this show was so important to to comedy so it is it is it making sense it's it's it's a good choice it was ahead of its time I mean in terms of what I think I like about it is I can watch it now and even as old as it is it's still funny and still relevant. Which I think is a good test of whether or not the comedy was truthful you know so it's it's it's a little dated in some aspects of it. But at the same time mostly still very true so very the Larry Sanders Show it's six seasons, and I'm I'm almost through season one. Nice Well, I I watched Ryan Reynolds he may be free guy Have any of you guys watch that? Isn't that isn't that a great movie? Like just just I mean the whole sort of commentary around how people go into these virtual world and turn into horrible people that just want to destroy stuff you know, that whole message? I thought that was that was that was pretty interesting insight. But the whole the whole movie, I thought it was absolutely brilliant. Well worth watching. Yeah, probably. But recently, what do you been watching? Listening to reading whatever, your distractions? Yeah, I'm actually really two extremes of one is Seinfeld is back on that on Netflix. And and I've just really started with Seinfeld. It's something we were just, you know, it's really what you live day to day and your expressions to make me think, oh, my goodness, what genius was, so bear that that's back on. But yeah, besides that, I think on the other hand, I've gone deep dive into certain warrior one things that we've just spoken about. And those two are the big ones in the social space. It's just, I just want to see where I can and the platform that I'm doing in one is no more than mom to do, because that's who I am but it's just no very everyday heroes and everyday simple people are the ones that they're going to bring about with really without the yelling and shouting How can we accelerate bits and pieces and without like, like saying the dramas on social media and the misinformation and all that. So it's it's just, you know, reading different perspectives, which I haven't done in the past, this is really very, very new for the last year, year and a half or so seeing things from different angles in the social impact space, because a lot of failures out there to be part of gaming to be part of the you know, the of even the rat race of social impact, just to be a moment there. But how much actual impact is happening is there's not as a lot of noise, just clutter out there and something that you can can pick in, you know, look at the folks that are really changemakers and you know, those are the ones which need to approach policymakers or things like that. So it's not, you know, a lot of the stuff on social media, which is a lot of crap. And a lot of a lot of good gets hashed and mixed up. But the real change is For me, it's my distraction right now to see which ones are the ones that are really making it happen. So that's a great opportunity, great opportunity for production houses or, or news houses to be wonderful curators. But those that seem to have started with that ideal tend to get tend to see advertising come in on their social media channels, and then tend to shift towards whatever is going to get more clicks. And that's the frustration if they could just keep their integrity to the curation of quality stuff. That'd be great. Mind you, as soon as somebody starts sponsoring me, I'll wear the T shirt on the show. But yeah, this is, yeah, we should all go to space. Big, big bucks and big influences. There's no harm, it's just getting the message out there in the right space, right. And the right actions is just identifying those and aligning with them. That there could be indirect harm, depending on who the big advertiser is, and the perceived acceptance of association that makes it okay. So I think you need to choose, I think whoever it is, it's choosing their advertisers. And I don't think on Google and stuff like that, are you able to choose your advertisers who pop up on your screen? I don't think so. Right? Google, I don't I don't think that Marshall. The big lesson that I took away actually was from a piece of comedy that was shared about you know, about News Corp, and talking about who's really in charge of the conversation. And the the skit was about, you know, basically Muse cops having a big meeting, and they're saying that the voices have spoken. And it's all it's the message has come from above, and we have to listen to exactly what they're saying. And is that you mean, you mean my dog and say, No, no, no, Harvey Norman. Right. So I think I think the the this is, this is the opportunity, right, which is the voice of the people spoken through as consumers to the companies that are the clients of media companies. And that really is what what, what makes a difference where it becomes unfashionable to do to have certain kinds of views, and things finally will shift around. So you know, as much as we test things like greenwashing, I think the the good advantage of that is the way I think, you know, I like the way, the way, the way racism had to be pushed out. began with a lot of people who, and I'm sure it still is true, who are racist, but won't say they're racist anymore, or won't behave like they're racist anymore, because it's really not appropriate that it's helpful to the impact of things. It's terrible, that they're still racist, but the fact that they're not acting as racist, maybe maybe good. So the same way. greenwashing I think has has that, while it's insincere in terms of where it comes from, its impact can be positive, you know, it can have a cultural impact to others rather than an internal impact for the organization that greenwashing is it can slow things down or making people think you're doing it but you're actually still doing you still polluting everything and then it makes people cynical so that means and then they don't want to you know, spend their money. Right So I mentioned you shouldn't listen to me at all. Agree agree with Joe on this one, actually, for my first in the last one hour, 45 minutes, but yeah. Yeah, because the that sorry. I was gonna say tissue destruction. But you know, I was just finishing because why did what he said is contrary to what Tim said that it doesn't show any you know, what you're doing the intent and the action of someone online and but actually, what would you say exactly bang on that, it the deterrent has got to be that strong, but even if you do not agree with a certain mindset, and a certain, you know, philosophy, are there certain cultural norms there, but it's going to be so wrong for you to go ahead and do that take that action speak speak that crap, you know, that that deterrent is what is needed basically, and that that's what these things are doing. But it's never going to completely turn around for us to think that everything's going to turn around within the in the gender space in the diversity space in the inclusion space or climate change. You'll always have a big big pocket of different sorts of naysayers and you'll have the it just depends on which voice is louder and loudest enough to make that that important change or that shift in certain, you know, decisions and policies, which will genuinely In fact, the noise is going to continue. I mean, I think I think the naysayers are getting much quieter now. And not quieter. There's just the tipping point of of aware This is definitely being heard. And I think whatever fight that they were fighting for whatever cause they were fighting for, which often is half the half the battle of trying to understand you know, so so one of the big climate deniers that I've been sort of monitoring he speaks to right wing think tanks and he gets paid by them. And so he when he speaks I he doesn't have any credibility because I know who is funding him, right. So that sort of stuff. But anyway, let's wrap it up team. What's your final? What's your distraction? You haven't said one? Looks like faulty internet is the big distraction. Yeah, I'm, yeah, I'm watching the the Orville and which is, like a funny version of Star Trek. But But what I like about it is that they actually talk about contemporary social issues in a really creative ways. And when Joe talks about, we need the artists to share the, to share the message in a creative way that doesn't necessarily Ciao, confront you personally. But it gets you thinking, because you accept that message. And then you see the underlying, it's a really clever, it's very, very clever. And it's funny, and, and different. And I just read that there's two seasons, I think, on Disney or on Hulu, which is on Disney plus. And they've just finished shooting their third season, which is interesting, but the creator Seth MacFarlane, who is a creative family guy doesn't want to do any more. So there's sort of a, he's bored with it, he wants to go do something else. But he's created this universe. So it's kind of interesting. Anyway, and the other thing is the lucid app. So it's an app on you can download, it costs about 100 bucks, or 120, whatever it is, and I think for the year and it is basically books shrunk into infographics in a progression of what happens in the book, and then you go on quite like that idea. And then you go off and read the book, or at least you go, Okay, I get what that book is kind of about. So obviously any, any, anything that is shrinking a book down to a few pages, you're going to lose the the meat of it, and you're just going to get the aroma. But but but I like it, I love the creative way. Again, it's artistic, the very creative sort of animated way that they introduced the concepts of various books, and that you could just consume in sort of 10 minutes to to, to, to know a bit more about that particular thing. So, for example, if that existed for squid games, I would I would read that, that version of I would want to consume a 10 minute version of squid games, rather than have to sit through this whole thing. Just so that I know what the social reference is. Without having to sift through what effectively sounds like Schwarzenegger in the running man. Yeah. The whole of Game of Thrones to know what Game of Thrones is about. Now you should read Game of Thrones. Well, I am but it's called the Old Testament. Pretty much yeah. Yeah, so So anyway, the Orville I like the lucid Yeah, it's entertaining reading so all right. Yeah, I'm still watching downtown by good luck Downton Abbey yes the people downstairs yeah it's great company right? They need an episode in there with the car runs out of gas that they need to put cheese and wine in it Yeah exactly. Quite right it's good it's a it's a it's a nice distraction it's a lovely distraction at these time it's a tight it's a different time and that's a nice just to pull myself out of reality anyway obviously I think he says so so so much for joining us really really appreciate it I hope you enjoyed yourself Did you enjoy your day it is so interesting it's such a lovely conversation man I love the the viewpoints going back and forth and everybody's coming from a different perspective or maybe different bubbles of their own but it's a it's it's educated and knowledgeable levels. And it's it's Yeah, it's been lovely. Thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate it. I up load this up onto my podcasts and commentaries as quickly as I can after this if people want to listen to it on audio, which they do. So you know, come and join us next week. We're here every week. 3pm Singapore time, GPM, Thailand time. I think that's about 9am European time, but don't listen to me from a timezone perspective where we're just really passionate about, you know, just paying attention to the news that matters and trying to make sense of it and I know that it can be a little bit overwhelming. So that's what we To do and we really appreciate everyone who's turning up and supporting us. So thanks for joining us guys. Well as as Tim said in description, right, she's the one who makes sure that we get all the latest news and then we are the ones who are the ones are going to ruin everything. So, thanks. Thanks for being with us. Yeah. All right. See you next week. But thank you, everyone. Bye and now you know