Uncommon Courage

The Know Show – theme: taking care of your mindset, with Wayne Chan

September 24, 2021 Andrea T Edwards Episode 13
Uncommon Courage
The Know Show – theme: taking care of your mindset, with Wayne Chan
Show Notes Transcript

Welcome to The Know Show. Every week, Andrea T Edwards, Joe Augustin and Tim Wade, review the news that’s getting everyone’s attention, as well as perhaps what requires our attention. We’ll talk about what it means to us, the world and we hope to inspire great conversations on the news that matters to all of us. 

This week we’ll be joined by Wayne Chan, MC, speaker and voice talent, he also pays attention to what’s going on in the news. Our theme this week is: taking care of your mindset. Like many, Wayne has struggled through this time, and as the pandemic goes on and on, it’s become gruelling for so many of us. We’ll share our tips and tricks for keeping our mindset in shape during this time. 

The Know Show is based on Andrea T Edwards Weekend Reads, and covers the climate crisis, Covid 19, topical moments in the world, global politics, business, social issues and passion/humor/history. Join us. 

Unknown:

We are live. Welcome to the no show. My name is Andrea Edwards. And I'm Tim Wade. Welcome to the show. Joel Gustin, will be joining us a little bit later. And who's our guest today, Andrea. Our guest today is the lovely Wang Chen who is someone that we all know. And he's a wonderful guy, and I'm super excited that he agreed to be with us today. Hello, wine. Hello. Hi, Tim. Hi, Andrea, thank you so much for having me. How are you guys doing over there? Yeah, no, good. Good. I actually I had to give you a heads up I got the signing back was the big push in Thailand. And then of course, when delta broke out it, they realize that it's not really going to do much good. So yesterday I got I got my first shot of Astra and I'm a bit sort of like, Pete, we zanco Yeah, yeah, I kind of feeling it. I'm definitely feeling dribbling halfway through the show, we'll know. Exactly, exactly. We'll take over. There's a few reasons I wanted to invite Wayne and one is because I really respect how much you participate in, in acquiring knowledge, Wayne. So that's I mean, and I know that, you know, you've got this big sort of showy brand, and you're an MC, and you do all sorts of really, really cool stuff. But you're also somebody that does invest in the knowledge of the day, you know, I you know, as you know, me, I very much admire that. So we're really happy to be here with you today. Do you want to give people a bit of a feel for who's Wayne and what you do? Okay, sure. I mean, for people who don't know me, my name is Wayne Chen. And I'm a full time host, emcee, aspiring speaker. My background is mainly in news and PR. That's where I started out. You know, I spent about 10 years in both in the newsroom, as well as behind the scenes in, you know, PR agencies in corporate communications roles. And then after that, I decided to just drop all of that and become a full time emcee. So that's basically me. Cool. So it's been a bit of a hard time these last 1819 months then, right? Yeah, I mean, the last 18 months have been just a big tailspin of I will use the word unpredictability. You know, it's something that, you know, I think we can deal with like three months, half year, one year, but I think in 18 months, a lot of people start to crack, you know, like 18 months of unpredictability. I don't know what's next. And I think just recently, I'm not sure it happened today or a couple of days ago, but there's this clip from this infectious disease specialists. If I'm not wrong, I hope I'm not getting his name wrong. His name is Dr. Leon hole numb. And he is often very popular in the media, they often quote him they get invite him to radio shows to talk about his perspective on COVID. And you know, previously, they had the H one, n one and all of that, right, the swine flu used to talk a lot about all of that. But what he said recently, they tried to get him to make a prediction about what's going to happen next. And I can't remember what his prediction was. But he said one thing, he said, I've gotten my previous predictions wrong. And I'm probably going to get this one wrong, too. And I thought that really summed up this whole pandemic, this whole COVID situation with delta and all the variances that no one is never going to be able to guess what is coming next or adequately prepared. Maybe if you are prepared, you might be pretty lucky. But the fact that matter is, there's no way to really, really predict what's next. And I think even the most Angel minded person, you know, probably would not be fully prepared for what's coming up next, because this is going to be a very long period of unpredictability. Yeah, no question about that. There was Yeah, I mean, there's some stuff that I'm going to bring up today in the news round up and we're gonna do it differently today. So we we've started off with you know, the really the news that really struck a chord and then we went into COVID News, then we went into the climate crisis and then we went into anything else. And it was just going on for too long. So what we've agreed to do is to compress it down my weekend reads which are published on every Saturday, you can find so much of these, whatever I'm going to talk about there but it's also going to be a lot more so there's always a lot going on in the world so I've just picked out the highlights that I'm seeing around the world that that seems that I believe matters and hopefully you guys are going to jump in and add your two cents. So you want to you want to get you want to get kicking, kicking that off. Yeah, let's do it. And then later we'll Wayne will talk more about the mindset thing and the struggle of mindset and I know Tim's got some really great insights and advice because that's an area of his expertise. So he's going to share you know, how do we cope with his time and the length of his time in the uncertainty and complexity at the time, so I'm looking forward to having that conversation. Alright, so obviously lots lots lots to get through. I have to have notes because there's too much to remember. But the UN an article headline un warms time is rapidly running out to limit global Heating to 1.5 degrees Celsius. We've talked about this many, many times before, but 1.5 degrees means a large part of the earth will become too hot to live. And this will be, this will impact the countries that grow our food so that people won't be able to go out and farm the food, which means we'll probably face famine as well. So while you hear people talking about two degrees Celsius, we have to get it under control before we hit 1.5. So in this report that from this headline, the World Meteorological Organization, didn't get their own data, wanted the new report, the governments are falling far short of the Paris Climate agreements goal of limiting global heating to 1.5 degrees. And we heard last year I think that Gambia is the only country on track for that. The UN weather agency has said on the immediate large scale reduction in greenhouse gas emissions can avert a global catastrophe. And the UN Secretary Secretary General Antonio Guterres has been pretty active this week, and has basically said humanity's future is at stake. The reporting is what he's been saying has been reported as frustrated and at fever pitch. Some good news on the climate side China's zing Zhi Jing Ping, has promised to halt new coal projects abroad amid the climate crisis. Now, I don't think a lot of people are paying attention to this, but with with new coal projects, and then the Green Belt and Road initiative in China, they have invested billions of dollars 160 billion to be precise. In coal, coal fired plants, they have an all been built they've been committed to and these are in countries like Malaysia, Sri Lanka, they're all around the world. So if you haven't looked at the the green belt initiative, or it's called pri, please get understand it a few years ago, I read a report that this single project will increase global warming by three degrees. So stopping investing in the coal plants in these countries is obviously going to be critical. But they also need to reduce coal at home. It reminds the primary source of energy in China by a longshot. Then China consumes more coal than all other countries combined in 2020. And it accounts for 58% of their energy use. So coal is a big one that we need to get off the table. And obviously China is saying by 2030, that they'll they'll try and get it get rid of coal. But we all know from what we're seeing around the world that it needs to be sooner than that. COVID-19 has now killed as many Americans as the 1918 flu pandemic, and it's continuing to explode around the US Alaska hasn't is now the latest hotspot. Jumping Oh, here we go. They have Mr. Gaston. Just barely, just barely. We're going through the news. Joe, welcome. We're going through the news, Andrew. Yep, Afghanistan so the girls have not been able to go back to school yet. And in good news. Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan has said preventing women from accessing education is an Islamic This is obviously an important partner and neighbor to Afghanistan so it was really good to hear Imran Khan speak up so anything jumped out at you guys have fun. I just want to say when you when you first told me that in a quick summary before all this happened, I thought that Imran Khan thought that behold not going to school thing all girls going to school was an Islamic and I thought he's changed. He's always been pretty cool. pretty liberal, right? Yeah. Which is the case I thought he'd been super cool if something happened to him, but I'm glad to hear he's still the same guy. Great. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. He's more than a cricketer, but he's a little bit more conservative than he used to be. Alright, so let's move on to orcas. Have you guys been paying attention to orcas in the news this week? Like killer whales? UK us. department. Yeah. I've heard a bit about it. Yeah, yeah. So we finished with we finished the no show last week talking about orcas. It was still pretty new back then. But there's been a lot that's happened since so France got really, really pissed and acted. And the reason France is so angry is because they had to do a submarine deal with Australia. And Australia's basically canceled the deal. America and he spoke to France, like to McCrone a couple of hours before it was announced. And just today I saw that apparently sky mo tried to call Macron the night before, and he didn't actually speak to him before the announcement went live. So they pulled out of talks, and they also pulled their ambassadors. But now they're talking again and trying to mend their friendship. And apparently the ambassadors will return. But of course, for something like this to happen, that means that the French will need to get something in return that that's going to make up for the billions that they're going to lose in the submarine deal. So we have to wonder what that is. China obviously isn't the answer. They're buying trains anyway, and because It's Australia. They don't mind slow trains. Oh, China is saying it is an act of aggression. So one of those stories is China flies 19 aircraft, including fighters and nuclear capable bombers into Taiwan's airspace as tensions build in wake of the orcas packed. So this is not a good thing. One of the things about Australia that a lot of my community is saying is, Australia still hasn't bought its air capacity for fighting fires. And we're looking at another dramatic fire season coming up in the next few months. But hey, let's pay spending our money on nuclear submarines it'll be delivered 20 years out. Good one Australia, Britain can use Australia as a base for its nuclear submarines which of course the New Zealand is not going to like very much. There's a lot to read but orcas challenges the validity of quad and quad is pacts between Australia, India, Japan and the United States. So the the Japanese and the Indians are actually looking at forming a new partnership. Many believing that's going to put NATO at risk. So it's waking, weakening Western alliances, Asia is not happy to restrict see Australia, doing what it's doing and is saying, My home beloved home country is a threat to regional peace. And we trust already low in the in the US, especially in the Asia Pacific region, this isn't helping the division. So the people in Asia Pacific have got a choice. They either support China, or they support the US. And this is how it's been, especially in the Trump era. So it's not helping anyone when more division is created. So that's been a pretty interesting story. If you if you haven't looked into it, I would definitely look into it. We are at a point in the world where these sort of agreements, you kind of understand why we need to be making these military agreements, but we've got much much, much bigger issues to deal with. So any any comments? Well, I was curious about well, who is a stranger sneaking up on because you get a submarine to sneak up on people? Right? So right? Okay. We're here for the ashes. Oh, wait, you already? Okay. Good. All right. The ashes with England but. But yeah, in Australia, what's the back? Yeah. Well, we were gonna have a lot of ashes in Australia of those fires. Go like they're being predicted. Exactly. Yeah. That's a big one. And the, you know, I, I can't I don't quite understand the purpose of the announcement. Why wouldn't you keep it quiet? I mean, isn't it military? Yeah. I mean, okay, you're, you're canceling the French one. But you know, so it just seems antagonistic. And then China goes, you guys are doing that. So we're going to go and use that as a reason for going into Taiwan. Which, you know, seems a bit weird. And then well, not weird, but just, you know, and then everyone's getting annoyed. Yeah, well, doesn't everybody else have aren't they all building warships? Isn't China making a big play for ruling the seas? Isn't it so it's it's it's all chest beating and but but the the criticism with regards to you know, spending all this money on submarines being delivered so far away. I kind of I get it, but you still need to make decisions that are going to take time to build. Yeah, but it's been it's, it's out of alignment with the future that we need to work towards. Right. And, well, at least it's nuclear. And we can take the nuclear waste and put it on the moon and turn it green. Yeah, yeah. And, yeah, let's interfere with nature in another part of the world, another part of the universe and see how it backfires on us, right? Yeah, it's we already screwed up Mars and moved here, didn't we? Yeah, yeah, it's um, it's just so out of alignment with where we are in the world and the antagonism but also, you know, just coming off the back of the Afghanistan war. Like there's not a lot of trust in the US, Australia, England combination of going to war. We've got a lot of failures behind us, right. So maybe it's time to wake up and let's have a think about what diplomacy could do instead. You know, because a lot of that the big challenge for for Australia, I mean, this has been coming for Australia, I think Australia is just Australia, during the Rudd government time was making was was making a lot of friendship with China because he could speak Chinese. So which was helpful, and then that so Australia was looked like it was sort of broadening its alliances with the new superpower. And, and still maintaining that sort of delicate this one goes out and says now we're going back to the old one, and that's partly because of the antagonism between Australia and China. Over Over many months now with which Australia created with with regards to sort of feeling like they're being bullied and all that, yeah, Australia's a bit daft with that one and then so then Australia's linking up with England and us who have a very long history of sending Australia into battles that that, you know, the hardest ones. Let's send the Australians in protect our guys. So but but I get you know, I get it. I mean, if Australia is under threat, who's going to come to help? I know I just I'd like I'd like to live in a world where we start preparing for war and start preparing for peace, because what we need is peace. So that we can come together, create global unity, get ready to face the issues that the world is going to be facing. And it's, it's happening now, like some of the some of the reports I'm reading, are fairly mind blowing. But let's look at another neighbor, Canada. So Justin Trudeau won the election. Did you guys say that? Yeah. Yeah, he was that was not expected. But he's got a minority government. And for the last couple of decades, we've had so many minority governments around the world and minority governments obviously are a problem because it ain't achieve anything because they don't have because they don't have enough power to achieve anything. So it's a bit frustrating. But from an environment perspective, I mean, we know that Trudeau is wants to do the right thing and make the right moves. But he's also signed deals with pipelines and stuff. And so but you know, buddy, you know, equality, equity, you know, he believes in all of those sorts of things. But apparently also, he's one of them, he's the leader that would be very keen to join orcas. So I think that means it will be rewrite, or sorry, rebranded as caucus, which is a little bit easier to say. I'm sure you can do a combination of the letters and come up with something else. But anyway, yeah, so today's back in the giant sequoia trees that we were talking about last week that were wrapped in plastic for one of the fires, it's raging through California, they haven't been able to get to the remotest part, remotest parts of this forest, but it looks like the sequoia trees have made it through this. So let me understand some things. We're saving the environment by wrapping it in plastic. Now, a little aluminium, yeah. Oh, aluminium, aluminium, just Singaporean say aluminum. No element. Like baby, just say, Tell me what you want? Well, it didn't foil in our day. Yeah. There was another article out isn't that somebody posted an amazing post on LinkedIn talking about wrapping the trees, but also these huge reflective sheets on the glaciers to make sure that the reflections going back to the sun. So it's, you know, at some point, that obviously, is destroying the ecosystems underneath the fabric. So you know, you kind of wind one area, you lose another area. So the technology solution for the climate crisis is solar power. Why don't we capture it? harness it use that? Yeah, I mean, the sheet, but the people are making it the Chiefs to China, and now they don't like anyone, so Okay. Yeah. All right. Let's move on. Let's move on to Australia and Melbourne. We could have a pilot, we could have solar powered submarines. It's just that they have to be at the surface the whole time. Yeah, they kind of wouldn't work. Yeah, so Australia and Melbourne. So my word What is going on? So the freedom fighters are out on the streets, and there's been more than 10 police officers going into hospital with broken bones as they've been crushed into the crowds. So the story is the tradies. And if you're not Australian, that means trades, men and trades women, so they're plumbers, electricians, builders, construction workers, that type of thing. They're going off over COVID mandates and access to tea rooms. The largest trade union movement in Australia is actually female. It's teachers, nurses. But there's a very, very small percentage of males, and no one really knows if it's the trainees, who are you involved in the violent protests, or if it's just violent protests is getting in on the mix. The protests headed to Melbourne's War Memorial this weekend, if you know Melbourne, this is a very, very sacred place for Australians. So it's not exactly going to win friends and influence people. But one of those protesters who was there at the war memorial is now in in hospital with COVID. There's another story of a Sydney Tick tock, who's an anti vaxxer and freedom fighter. He's now in hospital with COVID and so is his dad. So I hope he's dad is going to be okay. The media is obviously having a field day, creating more and more division, especially against den Andrews, the premier of Victoria. Murdoch doesn't like him very much. But this this confusion is really creating problems. When I look at my social media community in Australia on both sides of this argument. It's obviously it's very difficult to say what's true who did it believe who not to believe, and in the mix of all of these lovely violence in Melbourne was a magnitude six earthquake just outside of Melbourne. You And if you don't know this, it's a very, very unusual thing for for Australia to experience a magnitude of this scale in that area that don't have any tectonic plates. We, you know, reading through all of this, we've got such a long way before we can get to the end of this pandemic. There's so many boiling points around the world, people have had enough, they're protesting, but it's but at some point, we're going to wake up to the fact that it's only making it worse, we just have to get through it. And we have to do the same thing for the same time, everywhere so that we can get through it. But some other escalating violence that I've seen there's a freedom fighters protest in France, and some other protesters joined it and started beating those protesters with sticks because they're so sick to death of the freedom Friday fighters and the fact that they're elongating COVID. So that was not a very pleasant thing to watch. But that's kind of where we are, everyone's getting angry with each other. There's one thing about escalating violence in Melbourne, one of the stories that I heard was about how the the union members were unhappy with the union visit their leaders. And they found or they said that the leaders anyway said that the violence that erupted but they were amongst people that weren't from their union and actually had been, you know, that they just got involved and they weren't part of the Union at all. So it's one of those things, was it a contagion internally or did people actually make their way across to to you know, be held to both fire? Yeah, yeah. Basically, there is a story that the union leadership betrayed the union members so we've got to wait till we get into the bottom of that the fact that they're not Chinese protesting but then there's some obvious photography of them coming out of a building altogether and they destroyed the building. But it's Yeah, it's pretty it's pretty unpleasant. And you know, for everybody I know in Australia, especially in Victoria, especially in Melbourne, who suffered lockdown longer than anywhere else in Australia. The anger is really really growing towards this minority and it is a minority like even among the trade union members I think in the in this particular area, there's like 300,000 members and there's 3000 protesters so you know, it's a tiny percentage of the whole so yeah, the rage is certainly growing it's it's it's just it's just crazy, right? What we're saying it's just not nothing's helping any of us get through to get through to the end of this crisis. So I don't think it helps anyone else anyone's mindset right now Well, one of the one of the challenges that someone I know who was in public health was talking about is that really the approach that the Australia took or at least Victoria and New South Wales took was very challenging because it kept it wasn't a consistent set of behavior It was like we want to be extra careful but we're gonna have we're gonna have a cricket game and the MCG we want to be you know, we're going to have a lockdown here but we're going to have this big parade or these big sporting events were happening at the same time. So what what it did was it created this very inconsistent sort of expectation with the audience and so when you try to lock down an audience that doesn't feel that it had to do that in the first place, because it doesn't seem to be the case. That's that's how it all winds up this way. So you end up with I mean, it's a it's a it's a powder keg that's gonna go off right i mean COVID is winding you up you're suffering from other mental you know challenges and stuff along the way it's not going to use you as time maybe your your economically challenged as well. And then you know, something like this comes along and it's, it's a kind of a, it's a kind of an outlet, really, it's an invitation for some people to go out there and say something or just just, you know, I don't think maybe you go out there and say, I'm going to be violent, but you want to go out there and be part of a voice. And then what happens and what can happen is just you know, you're caught up in the moment something something happens and socially you go like, Oh, this breaking this thing seems to work. Okay, you know, and then and then it escalates. Yeah, the mob? Yeah. That's a real thing. And so hard to it is very hard to understand. But but but getting yourself in the middle of a group and being carried by what the group does. People don't understand that before they're actually in it. And then it's been shown that people have people who who've never had an inclination to do a violent thing, find themselves in the midst of that, and suddenly they get caught up in it. Yeah. Yeah. But overall, it's just not it's not really helping any of us get through this right. And it's making it worse and it's making the desperation and the starvation in the developing world worse. And that is always my focus, we need to end this virus for them because people need to be able to get back on their feet, earn income and get and get their lives back to some degree because the impact of the economic impact in the developing world, we'll be around for some time to come. So my heart is always with the people suffering the most. And it's the selfishness of the West, as always that creates. This is one that you're gonna like Joe. It's called climate change ETFs. You can tell me what that means found to be undermining war on global warming. So it's an article in The Financial Times I'll share it in the weekend read, and basically saying climate, climate focused investment funds, undermining the fight against global warming by routinely engaging in greenwashing. We spoke about green washing a few weeks ago. So obviously, if you're, if you're an investor, got to keep an eye got to keep your eyes open, and really keep up by pay attention to the greenwashing that's going on? Do you want to jump in on that one? either of you guys are one? Well, okay, let me give a couple of definitions. And then Joe can give his WISE WISE opinion. So ETF is an exchange traded fund. So basically, you can invest on a stock exchange, and you can buy and sell frequently. Whereas a mutual fund, you usually have to put money in and then give them sort of notice, and some days later, they might give you your money back if or months or whatever it was. So just little liquidity is a lot faster. Obviously, what they're suggesting is that these funds have been set up to what my guess is to reap the benefits of, of any green initiative. But some of the organizations that are represented in the fund that in other words, they're buying shares in other companies. The fund buys shares in multiple companies and has a basket of companies with various weightings depending on the company that they're investing in. And some of those companies are engaged in greenwashing or the fund and the fund manager themselves are greenwashing and the the danger for the fund manager is that people pull their money out and place it with some other fund manager. So they've got a responsibility to their own investors and their own shareholders and their own brand to do some due diligence on the greenwashing and not perpetuate it and of course the organization's who are chugging out the dirt and pretending they're clean they might have less incentive to change because their model is what their model is with so they're more likely My guess is they're more likely to fund the lobby and try and get in the back door with these sorts of fund managers or organizations. So the fund manager holds a lot of power to change behavior and if the fund managers can be held accountable held to account then or really placed their money elsewhere because you look at any sort of organization and and just look at the structure you can see you know what percentage is owned by fund managers it's they've got quite a sizable position some of them there's there's a I mean you say the investment in green stocks going off the charts right and that's been happening and building for a while and seen as a big opportunity for the investment firms but the the amount of media coverage and reporting that's coming out now around and how the vast majority of those investments are not actually green. So that's going to create a big crisis of trust in the industry and obviously there's potential other implications there people pulling their money out because they don't trust the people who are managing their money so yeah, it's a potential crisis and then Joe Have you got anything on that? Well I think that the the fundamental thing is you got to look at who are organizing these funds as in who are putting these funds together these fund managers right if they're independent and they've been set up exclusively to try and do something green fine. But if they are part of a you know, like a wider swath of investing investment funds, some of which are in other areas as well and this is just a different flavor then then what you're doing is you're looking at a fund that's been put together to serve a market rather than it is to put a cause forward right so it's a it's Coca Cola looking at the market and going like you know, people seem to like water so we'll we'll we'll set up a water thing as well but we still produce Coca Cola right? So that's I think that's the way you need to have a look at some of the history the the profit motive has to be there there's always a belief that we can do something about it and part of this is actually we're doing a trade with ourselves right we're trying to we're trying to we're trying to justify the pursuit of money the making of money versus the the cost of making that money or the or the ethical cost of that I think you have a story of of crypto that's gonna hit me in that way a little bit later on but yeah, so but but that's that's the thing now. It's basically the justification when you're trying to trade your guilt for something else. I don't think all the investing that goes into green is by people The wall necessarily driven that way. They just want to be able to shut some kids up at the dinner table. Yeah, right. There. Well, when are you in the investment game? Not really. I'm not really into the investment game. Yeah, I'm one of the kind of old school guys who keeps my money, like underneath my pillow and stuff like that. Give us your job. Yeah, what's your address? I need to send you a free book for shoulder pads. Okay, now I know what they are. Okay. All right, let's move on. So Boris Johnson has been in the us this week, and Biden played down the chance of a trade deal. So but Brexit continues to bite. He also made a speech to the UN where he said, humanity is reaching a turning point on climate change, duh. But obviously, that's all about getting ready, one, everyone ready for cop 26, which he's going to be hosting. The problem with Boris Johnson for me is I just don't believe him when he speaks. He's never struck me as a man of moral fiber. And, you know, many, many times that's played out over the years, Joe Biden has really stepped up on the vaccine equity front this week, I don't know if you guys have been saying that reporting. He's really trying to step into the global leadership position that we would have expected when COVID first struck back at the beginning of 2020. But Trump didn't, and he's lying is we need to go big. And while it's very, very long overdue, you can really see how much damage and credibility The US has lost around the world in the last few years, especially with the Trump years. And there's a lot of anger towards him, and as well as towards the US. So Biden's pushing for the vaccine technology and infrastructure to be shared around the world. And basically, let's get the job done. That's the message. But the pharmaceutical industry continue to push back against this. And I just surely they realize we're at the point where they've just got to say we have to do this. nobody trusts them anyway, you know, if they want to maybe get maybe get a little bit of an uptick in trust, do what's right, there's an article with the headline, who gives date for the end of the COVID pandemic, so when you'll be interested in this, but Bill Gates says he has the only solution to end the crisis. Now, it's one of those really divisive headlines, especially if you don't like Bill Gates, but actually, the point that he's making is, the only way we can really do this is to have factories that can produce enough doses for everyone within 100 days around the world. And he says this is something that's very, very feasible. So let's hope that happens, huh? Who said 100 days? No, Bill Gates, or Bill Gates? Yeah, basically, just do it quickly, within 100 days, get enough doses everywhere around the world, we've got the infrastructure, we just need to get the tech into it go 100 days vaccines out? Maybe we won't be facing that next mutation that everyone's terrified of right now. So I'm glad he said that because it, it, it takes away the, you know, could be 18 to 24 months, sort of wild statements that we're throwing around. And if it's really possible to do it in 100 days, and we get it done in 180. that's acceptable. Yeah. Right. So we've got a KPI now, I guess. Yeah. Yeah. until it's over everywhere. It's not over anywhere. And, you know, I posted that right from the beginning. And this, this, this mindset in the world that just doesn't seem to see that, like, if you if it keeps going in Africa, where it's, you know, wreaking havoc, well, it's gonna mutate at some point, and then come back and it's like, we're just gonna, we're just gonna nail these you know, and if vaccination is the way to do it, we have to get ahead of the virus, we have to outsmart the virus. And that's the way that we do it. We have to agree, okay, that's why we're going to do it. Let's do it. And all these opposition to it, it's like, well, do you want to just keep going through what we're going through? I don't, I know you guys don't. So what do we you know, let's get the consensus. Let's get going. I know that I know, in in the developing world, people are just gagging for the virus for not for the virus for the for the vaccine, because they don't have any access to it. No, like I need I need just got a proper one right here. We are like, what was the story about Japan giving what 20 million? was a 20 million to, to some to Asian countries? I think it was was it to Thailand? Yeah, Thailand, got some from Japan. They've got a whole bunch of AstraZeneca they've got a whole bunch of Pfizer. madonia is coming, but it's very slow. And it's like, you know, you'll get 2000 shots of Pfizer in in Phuket and then it's you know, within two seconds, it's registered and it's gone. Yep. So here's the here's the the the challenge I have with that one is logistically speaking Why did Japan end up with 20 million extra I don't know either. Now, Singapore did give what 500,000 to Australia, but then there's was a proviso that you know, you got to send it back when yours finally arrives. So that that sounds a little bit more reasonable is that, you know, we're still trying to get everybody vaccinated. But we're at a particular level where we're just trying to get the laggards now, finally in and getting their shots. So in the meantime, we'll send you the 500,000, you send us back the 500,000. Yeah, we in December when you get your shipment, that to me that that's like, we're trading based on what our numbers are showing. And who needs it quickly and stuff. I think that that's good politics, maybe Japan is doing the same thing. But But otherwise, Japan's being completely locked down, apart from the Olympics, they're being completely locked down since the beginning of it. So they need to be able to open up and if you want to open up, you've got to sort out your neighbors, Japan and greater locking down there, they can do it for 1000s of years. Yeah. Yeah, they went out we were doing, I'm doing this show with, with, with us right on. And one of the things that that was really surprising was to hear from the Japanese doctors what was happening in Japan, because you do think of Japan as being the leading edge, you know, kind of economy, technology, all that kind of stuff, right? And they're actually, you know, at the at the edge of their capacity as well. You know, they're actually in a situation where the the ICU are full. And I it's personally it struck me because I just thought to myself, you know, you think about Japan being all this, that that modern that far ahead. And then when when you hear doctors saying it's terrible, it's actually all for neglect. Oh, wow. So that that's the kind of thing that they're facing as well. Yeah, when you visit Japan, you see a lot of places that aren't as modern as some places. And they also have more elderly, right. It's one of the big elderly population, which is, which is a tough one to convince, because they've probably out of the entire population, they've theirs is the largest segment that has a reasonable reason not to get jabbed. But that, I mean, anyway, I was gonna say something else that may not, may not be as taken in great taste, but any elderly population is the one that you know, they might be thinking they might be weighing up some real mortality issues with regards to getting it and not getting it. So there's a couple of Absolutely, yeah, but but the number one thing that that that determines that you're likely to have a bad reaction is your age. So that's, that's something that, you know, when when, when the people who do the medical updates, scientific updates, I do one for longevity as well, right. And so that's the one thing if you can, if you can, it is the greatest determinant, if you look at that car, you see where all the deaths occurred, and all that it's almost exclusively in the upper range. Yeah. Although that's been changing in you know, as its Delta has definitely changed the game as far as who dies, and more younger children. So it's another mutation is the great few will be worse. US is allowing vaccinated travelers into the country from November. So if you want to get on a plane and go to the US, you'll be able to another report title, the rate of global warming during the next 25 years could be double what it was in the previous 50. So this is a new angle on the climate crisis that I read this week. So a former NASA climate scientist called James Hansen, he spoke to Congress 33 years ago, and said, the human emissions of greenhouse gases were cooking the planet. He's now warning that he expects the rate of global warming to double in the next 20 years. And the irony of this is because of reduced aerosol pollution. And that is what is leading to the temperature rise. So obviously, carbon dioxide and methane is still driving global warming, but it's it's being accelerated by the decline of other industrial pollutants. So it's kind of like oh, my God, how much more can we get wrong? So basically, what happens is when you when, when the sulfate aerosols have declined, what they're doing is they're making the clouds less reflective. So that mid slits more solar radiation in which of course, warms the land, and the ocean surfaces. So it looks like we've got to keep clean all of that up. But that's a bit of a we can't double in the next 20 years that that's not a that's not a good thing. Anyone else read that one? No, I've just always struck how every now and then you'll get some, some some some, you know, usually it's good news from science, but this is one of those things where you're like, ah, damaged science again. Yeah. Yeah, there's not a lot of good news from the climate scientists at the moment. There's a few of them that try to keep our hope alive, but a lot of them. I think a lot of them have basically, they're in despair. They just don't think we're going to wake up in time to have a reduced impact on our future. Another big story, this Wake has been the Haitian of Haitian migrants in the US, it's a terrible story. They're living under a bridge in Texas, it's 39 degrees Celsius, which is like 99 degrees Fahrenheit. So it's extremely hot. There's no sanitation, there's very, very poor conditions, it's difficult to get food, you name it. Some have been flown back to Haiti, and the Haitian envoy in the US has actually resigned because of the inhumane response to these people. But now 1000s have been given the right to stay. So they've been great granted refugee status. If you're not following what's going on in Haiti. It's a failed state, politically, economically, and in every possible way. So that's been, that's been a pretty, pretty sad story. Any of you guys have a look? Did you notice that one? I didn't see that one. It's pretty, pretty, pretty gruesome. All right. Another, which I thought was a wonderful piece of news. It's in a publication called the Baptist news. So this is American, America's religious latest speaking to its community, the title is COVID-19 and moral incompetence. It's been written by a guy called Wendell Griffin, who's a circuit judge and pastor of the new millennium church in Little Rock, Arkansas. Okay. Let me give you a couple of quotes from it. The surge of infections, hospitalizations, and deaths surrounding COVID-19 shows that moral incompetence can be deadly. And it reminds me of a warning found in the first chapter of Proverbs about the dangers that before people termed simple scoffers and fools, the article then goes into describing what each of them is, and he takes great pains to say that God will not protect you from COVID. He said, one of these statements is there is a model moral order to life that applies to everyone. So it's a real kick in the pants, to people who have been spouting those sort of beliefs. At the end, the data from COVID-19 is surging. Children who cannot be vaccinated vaccinated are being infected in an alarming rate. Hospitals are crowded health workers are worn out funeral homes or directors are overwhelmed. And he said, there are some obvious cons, these are some of the obvious consequences of the pervasive moral incompetence surrounding COVID-19. It's a pretty powerful piece, if you have an opportunity to read it. Some would say it's probably It's late. But when the religious leadership obviously speak up and speak to their to their flock and just say, Come on, guys, this is not the right behavior. And this is not what our faith is about. I think that's a that's a good sign. So you need to have a look at that one. Well, okay, again, responsibility for their for their parliament and not saying, you know, it's, it's somebody else is not doing their job along the way. It's, it's, you know, I wonder how many of them are really prepared to step up to the plate? Right. I mean, one of the things that I love best about, about the commentary, at least on the US situation is, you know, there's so much faith that you know, I will I will be protected against COVID-19. But I need a gun. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. The contradictions, right. It's just Yeah. No, Andrew, I like that one. I like what you were saying, I think that's responsible position from a pastor. Yeah, you really enjoy it, he sort of talks about, you know, none of us like to be tired. I told you so. And I think that's under the simple one, where, you know, we'd like to have the right to make our own decisions. But when that's the wrong decision, we don't like to be told that it was the wrong decision, you know, so it's a really, really, really brilliantly positioned article. And I think if it starts to have an impact, because I think, I think religious leaders in any because every every religion, I think it pretty much every religion, I'm pretty sure it's everyone has the golden rule. love thy neighbor. And some of them are worded differently, like don't hurt your neighbor, if you like it without, you know, if you don't hurt yourself, it's sort of bad, but it's the same, it's the same concept of love thy neighbor as you would thyself and if that's the case, if thy neighbor so there's a couple of things there one of them is you know, being understanding but the other one is, if the majority of the neighbors are saying please get this jab, then love thy neighbor and get it but then they might say well as I love myself and myself is don't get the jab. And so I'm going to love you by telling you not to. So and so then you know, we've got a bit of a conflict with that. So I would love to have a look at that particular article because I think it's a very responsible position. We saw early in the COVID crisis. You know, pastors going out there saying we don't want to shut down our church, we want to keep it going. This is very early days in you know, sort of April last year and and then getting COVID and dying and We saw churches here, who said, the senior pastor at one of the major churches here in Singapore, made a big goal to stop services even when we didn't have to. And they were praying about and everything else and, and people were getting, you know, different opinions about it. Not everybody could. But but his was, let's let's, the right thing to do is to go online, they didn't know how to well, they knew kinda knew how to they had to scramble a bit to do it. And then, like two weeks later government when we're closing that partner, something like that, I don't know about the timelines, but it was beforehand. And so there was another element of justified by it, but it was a very brave decision. And, and the courage of making those sorts of decisions, I think, will define leadership as we come out of this. And, and now now, we're a year, year and a half on from from that time, and we're getting a different we're getting a different voice, don't you feel? It's, it's I mean, obviously, we've got more knowledge and understanding, it's become sort of part of life a lot more. But but we're getting riots in Melbourne, you know, we're we're getting we're getting people venting social media is is is becoming even more vitriolic. Well, some circles getting vitriolic. And and it's it's just I think it's a it's a manifestation of people's anxiety. But But I also think it's a political it's been weaponized politically, for movements to try and jump into possibly peaceful crowd protests and turn them nasty to, to either show the incompetence of the current government or, or to lobby against some decision or something like that there's Yeah, you know, so it's, it's starting, it's, it's always been political, to a degree. And in the early days, it was about make the prudent conservative decision and protect. And now, it seems to be an Oh, people are hurting financially. And, and it's been, and some people in some countries, it's, I mean, Andrew, you see this, more than, than we probably do here. But in some countries, it's really devastating to what it's doing to the poor. But it's, it's being it's it's morphing now even so the virus is morphing. But our attitudes and behaviors, and our humanity is morphing. I think the vast majority of people want to be on the same side. And the vast majority of people are starting to speak up more, and then just not putting up with it. And there's a minority that believes in what they're fighting for. And I don't have any problem with that. I have a problem with the violence in place for having their bones broken, and all that sort of stuff. But we have to get to the point where we say, this is what we're going to do as a global society, and we do it. And you're not necessarily going to be happy with what that decision is. I think all of us err on the side of that we know the decision that we know that needs to be made. But if one of us wasn't, you know, we would respect that. But the reality is we have to get to a point where there's a decision and we move forward. And that's the end of it. You know, we're going to be here for years. Yep. Well, the big the big challenge that we're facing right now is that we're being we're being Joneses looking at each other, right? So is that the judges are looking at the Joneses and going like Oh, they seem to be doing pretty okay over there. And they're doing okay, over there. And what's happened in Australia, what's happening in Australia is they see the rest of the world opening up, and they go like, we want bad hand we're being held back from that. But they also don't want to embrace the whole idea of Well, that's because they have 80% vaccinations done. That's why they can do that said, Oh, we don't want that. We don't like that part where you're going to force us to have vaccinations, we want the freedom. And we want to have the rest of that stuff. But what about the vaccinations? It's okay. We don't want that. We want the we want the job what the Joneses have, right. So that is what causes that that lack of fully understanding what is happening around them. And there's so little effort really in terms of anyone trying to find out what they don't know. You know, there's this there's probably not that many people in Australia who think very much about why the lat mount is happening. They don't even they don't even explore the idea of the math. They don't think about the vaccinations. They don't think about the various Don't think about all those things, they just think about what they want. And they can only see what they want in context of what they see on the other side. But just like even here in Singapore, I have friends who are looking at what's happening in the US and the UK. And you watch it, you watch an EPL game and you go like, wow, that's, that's, that's, that's really going really well we're there without looking at the the other numbers underlying as well, you know, you have to take both into consideration. You have to say, okay, we're going to go and go back to sporting events. And we accept the number of deaths that's going to come along with that, even with vaccinations so the UK is dealing with that particular kind of, of math. Australians don't want to deal with that. I don't think well I'm this is a gross generalization, but I think those who are involved in that push against it, they're not doing it with the whole the whole picture in mind. They quit the death numbers, and you're like, Yeah, but kind of your country doesn't have high debt numbers because your governments have taken care of making sure that that didn't happen. Whereas the countries that didn't take care of that not happening I mean, just look at the next neighbor Indonesia You know, there's there's a very horrible situation going on in Indonesia is global oxygen shortages, you know, so we don't want multiple countries in these crisis where they can't even provide the basics when when it when the crisis happened in India, I mean, the majority of people who died did not need to die The only reason they died is because they didn't have they didn't have enough hospital beds didn't have enough oxygen they couldn't take care of young people died, you know, every single person I know in India lost people. People have probably been in my training courses died, you know, colleagues, you know, that I've worked with and it's just like, it's this is this is what we're dealing with. And you know, you what's happening in your country is one part of the story, but you've got to look at when it's out of control. And of course, in Europe, Winter is coming and America right? It's coming and that's when the virus seems to take off. So I, I am I was just thinking that, while you're saying that I was wondering, you know, you mentioned some people got COVID that were in the protests in, in Melbourne, they're saying that so it's an anti vaxxer process, they get COVID the guy and his father and somebody else they're all in, in hospital I understand that if you're struggling with something like that, the last thing you really want is the media turning up and saying what do you think now? But I would be really interested to see what what that answer is. I would love to know what that answer is. Because because it's going to be a different answer to when they come out. If if they're if they're saved from it by that by the doc by the medical scientists and the medical medical people who they've kind of been professing against because then they'll come out of this sort of I went through and it's fine see everything I said was fine. Yeah, but when they're in it and scared and and i and i and i get the the lack of humanity with that suggestion. But if you're an influencer can because Joe Joe was talking about just now was about how we've got this real pick and choose mentality. We see it in the church, we see people or and we see it in you know, people pick and choose the parts of the Bible that they like. And those other one I'm not gonna worry about that part. I'm going to choose a market it's called supermarket religion, right? Which I guess I mean, and and, you know, it makes it hard for the people who are trying to accept the whole thing because yeah, you're brandings kind of damaged but at the same token, it's the same for for lots of different parts of life where we're picking and choosing you know, keeping up with the Joneses is like, like Joe was saying, you know, I want this, but I don't want the the sacrifice and this that's the word that really did pop in. I want the benefit without the sacrifice. You know, and we, we idolize sports people. But we, and we acknowledge that there's probably some sacrifice, we idolize pop stars, I want to be a pop star. I want to be a famous actor. I want to be a sports superstar. I want to be loved it really is what they're saying. But they don't want to put in the sacrifice. Or they don't want to acknowledge the cost that comes with it. I did a speech at apss about that, you know, if you want to be iconic, okay, that's fine. Do you want to are you willing to accept the cost of what being iconic means and I remember when I did it, the majority of the room put their hand up at the beginning and by the time I finished only half the people put their hand up so they they were willing to accept the cost of being iconic, and that's like famous people or sports stars, but there's a cost of it, they lose their freedom. Yeah, every step you take forward towards what you think you want. You've got to accept the cost that comes with it. And it's not always a good cost. And so this is, and this is a great discussion for COVID. Yeah, is the cost of getting a jab? If you don't believe it works? What if you don't believe it works. But if you get the jab, you will get the freedom that you want. Yeah. Then get the damn jab. Now, if you think it's gonna hurt your life, you think it's it's going to have a detrimental health impact to your life, and that that is going to be pervasive for the human population, then that's a reasonable argument, if you've got some evidence that suggests that the human population is suffering as a result of the jab. Yeah, no, no. Why do you want to jump in? Because you're gonna, you might have a completely different perspective. I think all of this that's happened, right? is really everything has happened with COVID has been linked to a couple of things. One human selfishness. Secondly, foolishness. Thirdly, pride. Fourthly, laziness. Why do I say this? I'm to be very honest, to anyone that's listening. Why in the blue blazers, would you let a disease like COVID, find more human wood to burn through? It just doesn't make any bloody sense, right? All the way from the start. The reason why any of this happened is because we had a bunch of very greedy, incompetent, selfish and lazy leaders in charge of the world, you know, from all the different big countries as well as the World Health Organization. But at the very beginning, from China to India to us, each and every one allowed mass gatherings to happen even when COVID was spreading all the way starting from the Chinese Communist Party in Rouhani. Because of political reasons, because they have election coming, because you know, there was a big banquet, did he get a political message out, so they just continue letting people gather, because they wanted to get some kind of political message out, you know, or something or gain political points. Same with Trump. Same with Modi in India. And same with cgmp. In China, the same thing, the same damn thing. It is so strange. But even after that, all that happened, we just couldn't get our act together because people were lazy. People were selfish, and people did not want to pay the price. So the cost of what we're seeing of a harsh lockdown would be better than long term pain, which what we're going through because my friends were at a point where by actually we're very, very precarious point. Because the next turn that we make is going to be very disastrous or not. And I think there's still time to stop this thing with a very, very harsh lockdown. Yes, we investigate Yes, we test. Yes, we do trace but the fact of the matter is, this thing is not going to stop until you stop it spreading and also to friends are watching a lot of people out there who say that this is going to be like the flu after vaccination. Well, my friends, if it's like the flu, why are we still wearing masks, because we don't wear masks with the flu. But we're still having to mask up and socially existence, even ask the best nation that should tell you, this ain't no damn flu that you're playing with. This is no flu, there's no way to treat this, like the flu is not the flu, and we need to have a better way to do that. vaccination, of course, is something that everybody has to do, no doubt. But I feel that it's still like, temporary measured by some time to do something else. You know, I mean, after vaccination, what do you do, right? vaccination stops the people that we love from dying and being hospitalized and having a severe symptoms. But that's for now, we still need to figure out how to stop this thing from spreading vetch should not end and I think what leaders are discovering that this whole academic route actually might be a little bit of a mistake. And that's why you're seeing people like you know, like backing up Oh, wait a minute, you know, I thought after 80% of you could open right, you know, and but how come an opening so you know, there's something going on here and you realize oops, you know, it's kind of like every single thing is just going back to what the doctor said I said earlier, you know, everything that you predicted, you know it was going to go wrong and he's probably going to make another wrong prediction. He says that because i think that you know, the fact of the matter is, this virus is something that you can't outsmart and that's the problem with the whole thing is that everybody keeps digging. I think that somebody can outsmart this virus. You know what, let it spread. First, we'll come up with a cure late. That is the problem that you keep thinking that somebody can do this. Later to stop it. But fact of matter is you just shouldn't have let it spread. And it's really done. I mean, it's really done some damage. But is there some way that we can still Stop it now from continuing to spread? Is there a way to have like a, you know, mass coordinated worldwide lockdown for just one month? Just one month, which is what we should have done beginning, right. But can we still do it? You know, I mean, and if we don't do it, what is going to be the cost of letting it be endemic? I mean, that's why we do what we do Bill Gates plans, right, where we just get these factories, chugging it out vaccines all over the world, and within 100 days, vaccine, as many vaccinate as many as we can. And of course, we know that there are people who don't, who can't be vaccinated. So please, that's not what we're what we're saying, just we're at an hour, but awesome thoughts, wind, really, I won't go into the details, you can look at these articles in a weekend raise. But one of the one of the articles that I really jumped out at me is are we eating ourselves to extinction, and this is about the extinction of crops. So we've declined in the amount of crops that we rely on. And we're basically moving towards homogeneity without food, as well as how we shop when you go to, you know, a mall anywhere in the world. It's the same brands everywhere, right? And it seems so right now in the world, when it comes to seeds. They're controlled by for corporations, things like the world's cheeses, with the bacteria, and the enzymes are manufactured by a single company. And we all know that for human health, you need lots of different bacteria and enzymes in your bodies. What the one that the boys were like the one in four bees and a junk around the world is the product of one Brewer. So this homogeneous it is actually putting humanity at great risk. And we have to come back to that diversification. But there's some that's a really great one. Another one is in The Guardian. And it's a it's one of their long reads. And please if the long rates jump out at you spend the time with his information that can be a 2025 minute read this world that only wants to take in short amounts of information, we've got to, we've got to invest in knowledge. Again, that's a really big part of getting through the future. great article on food fraud, please read it. It's absolutely brilliant. Facebook has decided it's not going to apologize for anything anymore. Because every time they do know when it's nice to them. So they've decided on a big campaign of isn't Facebook. Awesome. So when you're on Facebook, and they're pushing their ads at you, which you know, they reject my ads, because I might want to talk about sustainability. And I'm not allowed to advertise that. But they're allowed to advertise and politicians are allowed to lie. But anyway, I don't think it's really working for them. The fundamental issue is a need to deal with their platform and, and the problems it's creating in the world. Jeff Bezos has pledged $1 billion to conservation because he was in space. And he saw that the earth looked fragile. So that's one good outcome. And then the final thing is here, what a crock of crap. Yeah, anyway, thanks for the billion. One, one headline that I think Joe will be interested in waste waste from one Bitcoin transaction is like binning to iPhones. And by the way, Andrea, since you mentioned the Jeff Bezos one, he just made that billion. Okay, exactly. Exactly. We need a little bit more. But Jeff. Yeah, so this is this is one of these stories that I've like, I'm not one of these people that will ever say that. I understand cryptocurrencies? It doesn't make any sense to me. I've tried, I've talked to people that are experts in it still doesn't. It's like my mind can't grasp the idea of what it actually is. Science is not sitting here as a person that sees me professing to know what I'm talking about what I just just give me six hours every week for the next month. Oh, that man, it's gonna take that much time. Yeah, it doesn't make any sense to me. But the but the environmental emissions from crypto, what is it? What's the mining? Yeah, like it's out of control. And it's just another story. And in the mixer, we've got this new technology, I mean, sending emails, has an emissions, you know, attached to it. So are we going to just keep focusing on making money? Or are we going to work out that we need to get it all under control if we got any chance of a Livable Future? And I, Joe, I don't know if you want to add that? Well, it's one of those situations where I'm going to defend where I am, but you know, it's I'm going to sound exactly like I do, I think to my wife every time we have some sort of argument, and I come up with a good excuse, or excuse, right? So like, like in this calculation about about crypto, first of all, it's often been bandied around that Oh, it's so it's such a horrible environmental thing. It has to stop. And then someone did the math and said, Well, in that case, banking has to stop because it actually is worse than crypto in terms of what it does. It does It's essentially what crypto or blockchain anyway is sort of able to do, if well implemented, it can actually replace the entire banking system as in like you can do, you can do things in a trustless basis, you can you can create things in digital contracts. So they automatically will do this and that and an interest is paid. And whatever it is, you don't need people to do it, the court will do it for you. And banking is seen as rather wasteful in that sense that a lot of a lot of people, a lot of human hours go into creating those things. So we have buildings that are lit up, we have computer systems that run banks, we have all the food to feed the people who work in the bank. Now, of course, people who work in the bank might not think it's a bad thing to be fed. But that's that's one of the ways to, I guess, measure the relative damage. Is crypto. Good the way it is right now? Well, more and more of it is getting closer to hydroelectric power and solar. So in that sense, it can be more neutral. But it is it is it does take quite a lot of energy. I guess by the by the same token, the all the other stuff in banking could be more solar and more, you know, hydro as well. That's okay. That's kind of an interesting perspective I haven't heard before looking at traditional banking versus new banking. It's interesting that you're in blockchain into it, because to me, blockchain is a technology that sort of delivers information safely. And I've always seen crypto is something separate to it, it could be delivered through the blockchain channel, but it's a separate thing, right? But it has to be built on blockchain. They can't exist without a ledger. And I'm going to try my two minute summary of what crypto is versus banking, right? wealth, and money actually was invented when people invented the ledger, when when when writing basically was a way to record who owns what and who loaned what to whom, and all that. And that was the very beginning of that. And what crypto is is the digital version of that which removes the need for trust, as in when it is written it is in this immutable record, which everybody has so that there is no doubt as to whether this is a true record or not. So in that simple sense, it's a it's a record of everybody who's who's there, everybody's wealth in there, you can you can keep your identity secret within that. But it's the record of everybody's wealth and transactions that go left and right. And that's essentially what banking actually is. banking is just a record of who has what assets and who has lent it out for what purpose. And literally what I'm talking about there, what banking does, is exactly doable using a contract in aetherium, for instance, a smart contract that says, when this happened, and that happens, and the other person says yes, then these funds get put across and all that and all that would happen without any kind of person having to be in the midst of that. And you wouldn't even have to trust this person because the code is what we get it done. Cool. Okay. All right. Let's go. With most of it. They're gonna bet it's got a bad mic now. Well, yeah, but uh, but but the way the reason why it's trustless that Joe was saying is that if I try and put on my ledger that I've actually got an extra few million bucks. everybody else's Ledger's will go, No. That's not true. Because it's decentralized. And so that's, that's kind of one of the inbuilt protection mechanisms of having everybody with with sort of the latest updated version of the ledger. Anyway, nice job, Joe. Yeah, nice job. Yeah, I will can take it for some reason, you know, you know, I don't think I'm a dumb person. But sometimes, there's some ideas that I've spent so much time charging, like AI and like the blockchain thing, you know, yeah. Getting getting pork from, from China to the US and having a blockchain along the entire cycle of the supply chain. So you know what product turns up in your country? That makes sense to me. cryptocurrency always struggled with? Well, let's, let's talk about some other things that have captured your attention in the news this week. Anything quirky, funny, unusual. What what I heard about was the power of the vaccine, that the COVID vaccine after a long time, and I thought that was really incredible. You know, like, people understand generally that you want to get the vaccine and but you don't know how powerful it gets and what I got, and I'm trusting I'm trusting what I'm going to say now based on mprs fact checks here, right? What they found is that long after the fact when when we We were worried at first that the vaccines were sort of like diminishing in their ability and power. But what what what they found is actually after a longer period of time your body does some very interesting tricks about in terms of learning and coding so that your your ability to fight COVID actually goes up after some time and in a bizarre way, in the sense that you can they say that you can you can they look at resistance to what is possibly the future variants of COVID as well. And they found that people who are vaccinated for this particular virus at this time after some time actually developed immunity to the original SARS virus from from 2003 So, so we can time travel it's it's amazing because what happened with the SARS virus is that all the SARS vaccine is that it was completely dropped because we completely lost interest in doing it and it didn't seem to be as much of a problem but so we we've actually essentially right now, not only got the vaccine for COVID-19 we actually have the the the vaccine for SARS MERS as well there was a report that COVID hit the Asia Pacific region in 20,000 years ago and that people whose ancestry is in this region has still got the genetic evidence that of that, that hitting it didn't go beyond the region and it could be why the death rate in this region is a little bit lower than the rest not just being careful but also the other side of it is more younger people are in the generations in Asia Pacific than than in other countries not Singapore not Japan but yeah it's kind of an it's an interesting it's an interesting part of the story I read that of all the vaccines the one that lasts the longest from an efficacy perspective is now been proven to be madona so dagnabbit yeah I took whatever I could get you go Yeah, welcome to vaccine bingo everybody Yeah exactly. spotlights on six Sputnik six. Wait, wait a second all of them. Yeah, I was sitting down yesterday and I said, oh, by the way, what are you what is advisor and they're like, No, no, Astra and I'm like, Oh, damn, alright. It's better than nothing. You have to take what you want when anything jumps out at you this week in the news and he especially quirky stuff Yeah, there's a lot of a lot of there's a lot of cooking news that catches my attention on the global front, you know, in something that's really funny happening in China and I guess this is the top of town among my arena because we're all entertainers and actors right? Is that China has ordered local reality TV shows the stop producing sissy boys and vulgar looking influences So basically, you know, guys who try to meet himself to like goes like, you know, wearing makeup and stuff like that. It's something that China is trying to lock down on. It's something it's something really, really strange. So that's the strange news. And apparently the reason why this is happening is because, you know, they're concerned about the broader societal culture that shaped by young Chinese people's consumption of celebrity news and TV shows, and its potential to run against the current values that's being promoted in China so they even came up with a list of the best 24 shows that people should watch and somehow these 24 best programs are kind of all linked to the China party and teaching ping so it's really really odd. It's Yeah, it's really strange. And I just want to add something as well I think one of our viewers province province shaker was talking about how you know my hair. He likes when your hair starts on tell province You know, this what I'm trying to do is in line with what the Chinese Communist Party is trying to do, so today, I didn't wear any makeup. I didn't comb my hair. I didn't shave. You know, I'm trying to look a little bit more manly, but you know, I don't think it's working. But yeah, that's what you want to do. would you would you be able to grow a Peruvian mustache? Do you have the capacity? No, not at all. Not at all. There's no way I can try I think during the pandemic, I did try not to shave for a month and I think I barely grew like an inch of like, stubble so you know, just isn't gonna work now. Yeah. might look more manly. And I think we should bring back the mullet. Oh, but as it ever gone so so while I love the the Chinese story so one of the good things about it is the Chinese government does step in when there's these crazy sort of trends and habits forming. So six months ago, there was a fair bit of coverage. So in northern Asia, so it happens in Thailand as well but Korea, Japan and China There's this thing where girls are eating in silence. And men watch them eating. And I've been in restaurants in Thailand where I've seen these girls do this, and it's just, I can't understand it. Now I don't want to judge it. It's a different culture, different, different needs. The men are very lonely, they love it, they give these women lots of money, everyone's happy. I don't think the women are disguising themselves, you know, they play music, they sing songs, you know, all that sort of stuff, right? But of course, within the China communist sort of philosophy, the overconsumption of the poor by eating, basically, that was spreading out into the, into the society. So people were eating more than they used to do. And China's like, well, that's just against our moral values. So basically, sort of tried to stop it. And it's one of the great beauties of the Chinese government, they can stop stuff like that when it gets out of control. But I mean, there's some extraordinary stuff going on in China with from an influencer perspective, it's, it's hard to make sense of it, you know, especially for someone like me, especially for the way that when what the women are doing, how they're behaving, but I try not to judge it, I try to observe it. I don't think the women are, I don't think that women lose power. I don't think it's an inferior position. for them. I actually think they have a lot of power. But it is very, very, very strange. And it's Yeah, it's hard. If you can pay attention to that side of the news, it's pretty, it's fascinating. Yeah, China's basically kind of said, Well, I mean, meeting, while I am embarrassed, always get the name wrong. But the leader basically is, is is not as comfortable balancing of playing a role between capitalism and and the the, the values of the party. So the balance has has kind of swung back towards traditional values, that the approach seems to be right now that capitalism is in the accepted. You know, like, it's not it's morally not, for their own for from your perspective is ethically not acceptable that you say, well, we have to be careful to stick about this and let the markets Just do it. So they've stepped in to do a lot of things and like, the evergrande de debacle right now, is mostly about that it's a it's a company that would never be allowed to fail in the US or the UK, or maybe even here in Singapore. But China's looking like it will let it fail because it is against the values of of, of their system, which basically is that homes are for living and not speculating. And evergrande A was was way too much involved in that was over leveraged in terms of loans for that, and the whole thing about the whole prices of homes were getting too high. So they stepped in and basically killed that company. Or at least it looks like it would they will die in the next next few days. So what's that link to the Alibaba story where they bought a piece and put it back together? Was that that story? There was a while ago? I'm not sure about that. But I know Alibaba, for instance, as well. They stepped in there they will also the group that was about to IPO and they also stepped in there and stop that from happening. That one they made they made they made tuition for profit, you know, illegal cetera, you only could do it as not for profit. And basically, the I think the guy, the billionaire, I want to say, all these are very successful man. His company went from being very successful to losing 90% of its value in shares, as their entire business model basically became illegal, you know, but they were prepared to make those big, big steps or take those big, big steps. And I think part of the reason why they can is that size of that market that they have, they're able to they're able to pivot and still go about their day. You know, I think that's one of the one of the big reasons they've been able to do that. They sold me this week. So I appreciate what they can manufacture. Good what what else have you seen that's kind of weird. In the news, I I spotted that my brother sent me this one it was a tongue gusta sized airburst destroyed towel al Harmon, a middle Bronze Age city in the Jordan Valley near the Dead Sea from nature scientific report from nature magazine, archeological digs found that it is like a meteor came in and exploded above the land, which is what turned all a lot of the sand and the buildings to to and some of the pottery to melt metal. altered it and turned stuff to glass and increased the salt content of the area. And that was where the, the Sodom and Gomorrah wipe out happened and they This is just published a couple of days ago. So it's really really cool. And a really interesting article from nature magazine. The other one from nature magazine that I noticed was published only a few minutes ago actually or a little while ago where the study is that the North Eastern the northeast of the US is warming faster than the rest of the US and this has been published in the journal Nature climate change and the climate scientists in the University of Massachusetts who conducted the study described the warming in the northeast is exceptional The reason they say is that ocean temperatures are rising especially fast in the North Atlantic because the underlying underlying causes a slowdown in the Atlantic married meridional overturning circulation which is like a conveyor belt system that they are the movie The movie after what is it after tomorrow after tomorrow it's based on that sort of concept so that's that's they think that that's almost on it's in crisis but we don't want that stopping yeah no we're saying that the chances are America will heat up and Europe will freeze yeah if that happens so so that that one that one they're saying and the east coast of America could become worse and so it's anyway it at least it's it's getting more attention Hollywood tried Hollywood tried that's one good thing about Hollywood that they can actually be well ahead of the curve because they're looking for interesting stories and concepts to put out there but at least we have references like you go yeah the one day after tomorrow and it's like cool if that's happening not so cool. But it's one of my last two movies because it's it's it when I watched it it's like yeah, this is this feels possible you know all the other disaster movies you know the the one there's one in South Africa where these all these Martians come in they live in this really is yeah but day after tomorrow felt real and there's a new one with the moon the moon crashes to earth but but the other one that's coming but but that one Yeah that one I mean the thing I loved about that one is that the America had refugees trying to get into Mexico Yeah, and Mexico let them all in yeah and forgave all debt yeah yeah looking at doing now but yeah, so the other thing that the big thing that happened in the easiest way to forgive me yeah all the Americans looking for work at the Home Depot like what Anahata Spanish but but not against America of course the whole world's got this coming but it's a anyway the study is that they're showing it's getting it's getting harder. It is absolutely no question and there's a new iPhone on the market now we just want to encourage everyone if you don't need new iPhone, please don't upgrade children suffering mines getting the precious metal metals that go in your iPhone. It's an environment disaster. You're getting sucked in by aspirational marketing which makes you feel that you need to have the latest version of the iPhone and the reality is no one knows what I find you've got unless you tell them so I've had my current I find for years it's it's on its last legs The cover is sticky because I can't get a replacement cover because I don't do them anymore. But um yeah it's sort of we've got to start looking at things like a waste it's growing it's exponential its growth and it's not being put back into into the future products so if you can avoid let's let's not see record sales for the new iPhone and I'm sorry, can I have one if I give the Samsung away How long have you had your Samsung for it's been it's been adding three to four years now. Yeah, Joe Joe long he's got a tattoo on his left butt cheek that says stem and then the other one that says done so I'm gonna I'm gonna get one of the new phones because I have to because you know just like the the video on the photography. None of it before our work that we do so but at the school whether my boys go through all these scholars, and so I'm going to get new battery I get a cleaned up get nice cover and I'm going to give to the kids you know so it will it will live on rather than look crazy plug for the iPhone 13 even though you just said long get one. If you if you don't need one, trying to communicate really well. You can stop buying big cameras altogether now with the with the iPhone 13. That's one of the real benefits of this particular upgrade. And it's if you if the thing is think about buying a camera like Like, for instance right now the camera that I'm using is the one I learned the Tim as well, right? Back cameras become redundant with the iPhone 13. It was. I mean, you don't you don't need such high end cameras anymore at least at that part of the market because the the iPhone 13 is just doing all that. So one upside, and the only reason why I'm probably going to be getting it is that and because I've had this thing for, you know, from a long, long time ago. So yeah, so let's, let's make sure that our waste goes where our waste goes next doesn't go into a landfill, e waste landfill. And that's the important thing, taking responsibility for that. But don't upgrade just because you want the latest because if you can, when you have an older phone, try it, try it. And this is the terrible part is in trying to upgrade its battery so that you can give whoever it is you're going to give it to next. It can have a useful life. But yeah, don't don't let it be the last time you use it by putting it in the drawer. Yeah, exactly. We've gotten a lot of those rounds. My daughter turned five. Yeah, yeah, my boys are an eight, and they're desperate for the lightest. And I'm like not even two years. Okay. My dad use an actual tablet made of stone. So you know, hey, yeah. My dad doesn't even use one. Okay, so we thought would be shorter. Why not? So, sometimes I think we should give up even trying to be shorter. But this week's theme is tape. Yeah, no. Well, you know, sit back, listen, put it in the background, whatever you need to do. Taking care of your mindset, at this point into the pandemic, obviously, a lot of people are really, really, really struggling with what's going on just, you know, it's never ending, you know, there's a lot of suffering. And you know, we all know we're in the same storm, but we're not in the same boat. So the first world problems, sometimes people feel that they don't feel really justified in feeling the way they feel what they feel guilty about it. But we're all going through various emotions, you know, I go through weeks where I'm just not just just not in a good place, because it's just relentless. What's going on? So Wayne, I know you've really struggled with it, you want to just say, give us a view from, you know, the millennial, the millennial view. But you know, we're a bit older than you. And we've probably been through more crisis than you're not like this. But how are you feeling? what's been going on? Yeah. I mean, first of all, I'm not sure that I'm qualified to give them a linear view. I know I look that way. But what's that? I'm sorry, is my wife. Sorry, go on. Okay, anyway. But But having said that, yeah, I think it's been a really like nothing any of us have experienced before, right? Going through 18 months of unpredictability. It's been tough, it's been very tough. I think for people like myself, mainly, who are in events and entertainment, it's been a very rough 18. Now coming on to 20 months, right? It's like, one minute, you're always busy. If an event, right? our lifestyle, it's like, you know, this week, what are two or three events that we are running, right, and then suddenly, from, I don't know, 10, to 20 events a month, going down to zero, all of a sudden, and I think at first everybody thought, Okay, this is just gonna be like SARS, right, it's gonna be just maybe three, four months, okay, we can just go back, and like, you know, maintain our equipment, clear all the backlog of admin that we had, and then after that, things will start running again, you know, some way in August or September or July, but it doesn't happen. And then a year later, it didn't happen. And every time we look as if we're gonna open up, it doesn't open up and something else just throws a spanner into the works. And I would think that, you know, the mindset that, you know, we may need to have, I'm not sure how to have it, I'm not an expert in mindset, or agility or any of this, but we are in a place whereby things are rather unpredictable. And we may just have to prepare for some kind of unpredictability. Even for myself, you know, I wouldn't say I'm the strongest person around, but I do try to be positive and all of that, and doing that for 18 months straight. I found it actually pretty difficult to continue doing that for the past one month, because, you know, I've been holding on for like, 18 months and just drink be positive and pivoting and doing virtual shows, or whatever you have it. But after that, you just wonder, wait a minute, what's next? You know, because I used to know what's next. I always used to seem to have a plan, but now there is no plan for what's going to come next, you know, is it going to be something whereby we're going to be socially distanced forever, we're going to wear masks forever. We're going to be doing this forever. So it's, it is really, you know, I can't I can't figure out what's next. So that's, I think the state of mind a lot of people in that you know, what is your Next for all of us, do we ever really get opened up? Is the vaccine the end? Or, you know, are we gonna have more unpredictability? Yeah. So teams just jumped off to go to the toilet, he asked me to spotlight you, but I don't know how to do that. So we'll just wait for him to come back. But I think my idea of this was, was so that Tim could discreetly go to the toilet, and then we could mention it on the field itself. Yeah. Yeah, I think I think, you know, I'll just, I'll just inspired by the idea here. And I think, you know, you're always wondering what's next? That's actually the answer, you know, next is next. But basically, you've got to take the next step, when you are when you're trying to cross a river, and you are looking for the steps of the wallet, there is only the next step that you can choose from. Sometimes, and sometimes if you get to a place where you're like, Okay, I got to turn back and try something else. That's sort of it as well. You know, on one hand, it's a strong mindset to have I call diamond hands and go, like, I want to hang on to this, I can stay here I can steep the cost, I can keep going. But I think what we should be looking at, in terms of how life works, to me, anyway, is that it's, it's like a river, or it's a kind of a body of water that we're that we're traversing, and we're used to the way it was, but we're moving, we're always going to be moving and come to a new place. And in the new place, the currents might be different, the, you know, the cost is, is different. So those, those are the things that I, I think, can help some of the people who have made it the best through it, especially from the entertainment business. For me, I've seen them as well, other people who were able to just get down to doing something else first, you know, and so, and found, MSA found pride in what they were doing in the meantime, you know, this, it's, I think that the challenge is sometimes we can't see ourselves doing something else. And I'm guilty of that, as well. I try as much as I can to keep doing what I'm doing. But we've also got to wrap ourselves around the idea that you know what, maybe that thing isn't going to happen, it just isn't available for now. And we have to figure out something else. And we might be a bit embarrassed doing what we're doing. I have friends who, from the business world who have preferences going into streaming right now and they're and they're streaming for, for lazada and shopee. doing stuff which I imagined some some time ago, they might not they might not have thought that we're doing that I wouldn't do it, but they're doing pretty well. And I think they're doing pretty well at it as well, you know, it looks looks like the stream that just just complimented someone on that as well for what they're doing right now. So it's a little bit of a challenge, I think in Singapore, we are we are also very much driven to two hanging on to the, to the last high tide you know, we were we I've got two here. Now I can only go here, you know, when, when there has to be a little bit of, of the pie going up from time to time. Yeah, the the analogy I like for that. One is that they just different letters. And when you get to one letter and you're at the top of it, you need to jump to another letter. In this scenario, you're going down before you can go back up again. But also there's an element for you digging, Tim, I just wanted to talk about an idea that I call that one of the laws of energy, the universal laws of energy is what you resist persists. And I talk about it in my book, right as a chapter and COVID-19 is a global example of resistance, what you resist persists, and it is what it is, and we can't change that we can all do our part contribute with communities that we're part of. But we've got to make sure that we're not resisting the truth of this moment. Because the more you resist it, the worse it gets. And you don't want to resist it because you don't want it to get worse. So when you move into a state of acceptance, so this is what it is, this is how it's going to be. And then you then focus your energy on what you can do, rather than what you can't do. Because when you're in the energy of what you can't do, you're stuck. So I always say You know, sometimes creativity and innovation Joe's example of the people doing live streaming for Lazard a perfect example, right? Try and find a way to get out there and be part of the world, your world in a way that makes sense to you. I've got a lot of people in my community with musicians. And you know, some of them had to go and work for call centers, just to get the income to get themselves through these time. It doesn't mean they won't get back into music or performance afterwards, but they need to get through these times. So but the most important thing is don't resist the truth at this time. If you resist it, it will be worst. Accept it. Move into it. And the the process will be a lot easier. Alright, so Tim, you've got a little bit more. I've got another idea. I was. Yeah, I mean, that the other the other part because I was talking about ladders just before sorry, but the ladder still presumes where we want to go up. And so there is a point where, where there is an age that we get to in life that you tend to decide, no, no, no, no, this is there. I mean, look, when people retire, they're at the age where they get to live where they go, Well, this is enough. That's, that's, that's effectively what retirement is. It's the, this is enough moment. It's the moment where they go, that enough of doing that I've accumulated enough or if I haven't accumulated enough, what I have is enough, and I'm going to manage my enoughness and so in a sense that doesn't have to happen at a pre described pre prescribed age we can make that decision almost anytime. which is which is the I guess the philosophy of contentment because we are buying into this need more. So we've been we've been conditioned to buy more to need something else to need it the next level of something and we need to end because we need to. We need more. I'm drowning in a comment here. There's a lot that ignore. I wish I could say who posted them. I can't say somebody said this one. I miss you too. I don't know who you are. I can probably see the comments. If I press the button that doesn't make noise happen. Now I can't I don't know what's happening. Oh, here we are. This is my favorite one. Yeah, that was because I because I'm trying to out Praveen Pravin and that was before. Yeah, I don't think I'll be able to have Praveen Praveen, he is the Praveen I'm not sure who said that because I can't see I don't know what's happening anyway. So yeah, the idea of contentment and now so there's a challenge here the the challenge is in the world of motivational speaking typically the the presentation is you know, go for the goal set your goal your goals way up here make a big big fat hairy goal all this sort of stuff. Big Hairy Audacious Goal I think it was the the one from like two decades ago that people still talk about. So it's like you know, have you go have it up here ever this you can do you've got two actions to go for that goal. You can sacrifice work hard. let things go make decisions in your life that you're going to do there's not going to do that be singularly focused go for the goal you know, make it all consuming burn all the boats, all this sort of all this sort of stuff. Or, you know, you can drop your standards and not have to change so much because because you know, you're dropping your standards and so it's framed in such a way that dropping your standards is an evil thing, and that we should be going for this higher everything else. But the truth is, you know, there's some some of those goals I'm still holding on to and I may need some advice from you, because I still think I can play for Manchester United. But But I may have to release that one at some point. I because I think they're getting there now. But the but but except for my but the but we there was a there was a contentment that we we have discontent, a lot of this feeling of anxiety that people having. There's the people like to have it, they'd like to be diagnosed with something, because then it's not my fault. And I get that that is real for a lot of people. And I get that a lot of trauma has come from external situations, and the interpretation of that insert external situation. And I know that from the the military side, that trauma is very real, and you're seeing stuff that no human should be exposed to really. And of course, it's going to have psychological consequences. But but there is depression happening and and types of this happening in in anxiety and very real anxiety. I'm not minimizing the anxiety and I'm not. I'm not intending to minimize anybody's personal experience and become a punching bag for that. I I'm just saying that this, there's a couple of different ways that it's how we are framing our existence, and how we framing our identity, and how we're framing our position. And what it means if I dropped from that position. So I mean, a lot of us are well aware that, you know, when it's, especially in the traditional age, when a man would retire, he usually be dead within sort of five years. Because Because his purpose had gone. You know, I've had experiences in my own life where I came out of a career, and my whole identity was that career, who are you? I do this? No, who are you? I do this? And, you know, and if that's not who you are, and and so it's like, the loss of Vega, right? That? Well, a lot of it is I mean, it's not, there is a there definitely there's ego, but then there is validation, as well, there's, there's this core need to be validated. I see. That's, I think that is a real symptom. That's a real part of the foundational core problem of why we get this vitriolic venom coming out on on social media. It's, it's this need to be, well, part of it is the ego part of social media. But that vitriol that need to be right, instead of compassionate is, is and that need to be right is because I feel I've been wronged, or I feel something is not working out for me, life is not happening the way that I design it, which is still putting self above everything. And it's still saying my life should be like this, and it isn't. And it's that person's fault. And then getting really angry about blaming and justifying everything else, rather than that level of acceptance that Joe was talking about, about, about needing to move on, or needing to and you Andrew, when you were talking about some of those people were saying I need to, I need to just adapt to what we need to do now. which is which is a very resilience and, and practical mindset. But But I know other people who who define themselves by this role that they had in a, in a movie that gave them you know, 30 years ago, and they've done nothing since and they're still trying to relive that moment. Or you know, you know what I mean it it's, it's that what's his name, and Along Came Polly, the what's the actor who died a little while ago. He was a childhood actor anyway, go much Along Came Polly, it's worth it. I think the other thing that I've really learned in this time is being where I am in Thailand has been a real gift from from, I can't feel sorry for myself, because there's so many people that are so much worse off than I am. And getting involved in that. Getting involved in raising money feeding, feeding 1000s of people every week, being involved in this community that has come together called one pocket, to take care of our neighbors to help everyone. So the idea is we leave no one behind. And we, we try and make it through this crisis together, because we're all in it together. But we're all impacted in different ways. And that's really, really helped me and I think if anyone's feeling really down, go and have a look for a community, in your community in your community, the charity, that's doing some good work, whether it's the Sikhs in Australia, who are just cooking and putting vegetarian meals out into the, into the community wherever they can, or donate, it's, it's participate, don't just donate. And it helps to you feel you understand how lucky you are in the midst of, of what's going on around the world. Yeah, I agree. And, and that's where travel in the in when we were able to travel could really make a big difference. Because you would travel to places and just really get it. It's also why a parent saying to your kid, you know, think of the starving kids in Ethiopia doesn't work. Because they're not. They don't feel it. And it's why when your kids are exposed to that, that they they they can feel it. And it can make a real impact as well. And but but like you said, Andrea, you don't have to travel to see it because it is in reality it is in our own town. And there there are people struggling and and we can we can you know make a difference. There was a piece I wanted to share and I'll send Andrew, I'll send you the link if people are interested in it. It was I don't know what you think about him. But he certainly out in the media and certainly coming in my feedlot is Dr. Jordan Peterson and he sort of he certainly has some, some quite polarizing views sometimes. But I think quite an intelligent perspective. And he's As a psychologist, and I guess I respect the psych side of it as well. I, anyway, so he was asked, he asked the question this this popped up in my feed earlier today, Andrea, you're going to be you're just gonna read like, you'll get it. It says, Are you depressed? Or are you just at the bottom of a dominance hierarchy? And, and his end, he said, because the symptomology is very similar, but the cause and cure are very different. So the symptoms can be the same, but the cause and cure are very, very different. So he's not minimizing the cause. And he's not, but he is, he is. But he is trying to get you to be aware of a thinking about what it is and not just take, you know, a doctor, you go and see a doctor, you go and feeling like this, he goes, Well, you're clinically depressed, is like, Is it that or, I mean, yeah, you're experiencing those symptoms, and that feeling, and that's very real. But, but there's a perspective element as well, when he talks about what a dominance hierarchy actually is. And, and, and part of it is, is the end, he does talk about levels of serotonin, and how some people can can have that, that confidence level and that dominance level in particular, that keep others down. And when you when you keep the others down, they're feeling this anxiety that these guys may not be feeling. Because they're big, because they're in there being dominant, they're in a power, they're feeling an element of powerlessness. And with something like a global pandemic, that powerlessness is we're feeling it because because governments have to make decisions for and we're being locked down and all this sort of stuff, or businesses just evaporating or, or slowing to the point where significant changes need to happen. So we end and we're, we're seeing that people's mindset is being impacted. Mental health is happening as well. But some of these outcomes that we've been just been mentioning just now could be getting us to recognize that that powerlessness and it's, it's a bit different to post traumatic stress disorder, it's a bit different to clinical depression. It's a bit different to these other areas, which can be long, long onset and long tail. Or quick onset but long tail. This one could be something that that we're we're still resisting like Joe was talking about. We're really this is the change. Yeah, it's so important what you say Jordan Pederson is a really interesting character for me because there was this global backlash because I don't think he's particularly appropriate in the way he communicates. And he gets people off siding, mainly the feminists right? And so then the it reverberates around the world and he becomes the enemy of women. But I've spoken to far too many men, some who've been really really suffering and he's helped them so he's always someone I'm open to so I think for anyone who's heard the message that he's not a friend of women, he he's doing a lot of good work and a lot of meaningful work and he's helping a lot of people so stay open to him don't respond to the global backlash. Find out yourself and then the other thing like what you're saying Tim, so I'll share that in my weekend reads if you get it over to you because it sounds really fascinating is spend the time understanding this spend the to like go and look up depression and what it means and what the symptoms are you know, like you know lack of sleep it's one of the first signs but maybe it's not maybe it's something else but let's let's let's move on to the final stage but before we do it, Joe, I think you need to cherish your T shirt this week. Oh I chose the T's here we go this is my T shirt. It's a brain it says use me well sometimes what can we get better on the job calm No. Friend Yeah. Quick Grande. Sometimes people look at it and they see they see a bikini with open fronts but it's it's a brain that's a very good message. All right, so the final quick session is what what has been distracting you week so watching, listening, reading anything, something a bit of fun, something you know, not too serious. Can I can I just have about two minutes and read before we do that? Because you just mentioned signs of depression. I did do a bit of bit of a bit about that as well. tiredness, yeah, it tends to be one of the number one ones chronic fatigue or feeling burnt out. But that doesn't mean you're depressed. It could mean you're sleep deprived. But you could be sleep deprived because you're tossing and turning all night. Because you're there because of some anxiety Hey Feel free to jump in any one if you want to. And there's languishing as well right became a word of this time. So the languishing is just can't get the energy up because it's just too that's here and but the end the other the other one is this intense weight of meaninglessness or what's the point notice yeah and and then the the lack of motivation that comes with that and the you know and people are just like you know just break through it willpower all this was a, it's just the battery is drained. It just feels like but but there's a few other signs out wanting to be alone, avoiding socializing, even with friends can't focus memory, memory problems, loss of appetite and helpless and insomnia, mood swings, irritated, easily temperamental. That can happen obviously, with lockdown and close quarters and just getting in each other's face, particularly last year, we saw that happen, a lot. Break breaking down and crying or just this feeling of overwhelm, shame, embarrassment of guilt, or even talk about it. Or just other things in life. Self blame, anger, trauma. overthinking no motivation and procrastinating. I mean, it's procrastinating that I've been depressed for 50 years, but but I think it's a chain and the other thinking side as well. But the so that's really important. Because everything I've said, a lot of us can go oh my gosh, that's me. But that doesn't mean you're depressed. It's usually going to be a lot of these things happening at once. So you know, what, one of the biggest challenges for me is when when when there's a list of stuff, like that guy goes out, and people identify with part of it, and then they, they they fall there that? Yeah, and it's self actualizing. And that's the real, the real scary thing. It's the there's the Web MD effect, right? When you look at Web MD, and Yuki and what you've got, oh, that's me, you know, and then the rest of it happens. But yeah, that's the other the flip side of it. I just feel like, there's all those and then, and then there's the other thing they could be as well, right? Yeah, yeah. So now the depression tends to have its persistence. And I didn't mention suicidal suicide, suicidal thoughts or attempts in there, that can also be in there as well. Sorry, Joe. I just wanted to get those. I was gonna say I have to send my daughter off to tuition because I'm a casual Singaporean that way. But I wanted to, if I can give you my suggestion for a way to distract yourself. It's been offered up to me so many times on Netflix in the last few months. I've always not touched it. I finally did. And I absolutely love it. It's called the fix with Jimmy Carr and his cast of comedians. They tackle all kinds of problems in a fun way. And if you're depressed, those topics are depressing, but they make it fun. So go check those out for a bit. go fix nice. All right. Why are you on mute? Joe, if you need to pop up, obviously you just jump off. Okay, Joe, Joe, based on what you said earlier, you should be sending your daughter to tuition in China. Okay, but Yep, so you have to go. Well, what are you what's distracting you? What's distracting me? Well, I would say that, you know, over the past like, one and a half years, I think that PC disease probably my my sports. You know, I'm a huge basketball fan. So I spend a lot of time playing basketball and I've moved to woodlands. I live in New Orleans. I used to stain techniques. I used to know everything in Japanese. But we got close to the dress close to his address. Yeah. mattresses. Yeah. So uh, yeah, by the way, how's your mom? What's the name again? Yeah, what's your favorite house number? My name is Mrs. Augustine. You're gonna go boy. Yeah, so I think sometimes, I mean, I'm just trying to just match I'm just trying to like, pull a treadmill to everything that we just said, sometimes you just don't appreciate what we have. And also, some of the little blessings and I thought some of the little blessings I felt that you know, was really amazing was just making new friends in my neighborhood. I actually have like a whatsapp group with people from my neighborhood. And these are people from the ages of 15 to 55. It knows still, you know, deciding that they want to come down to this basketball court in my area to play and it's kind of cool to get messages from people that you know, like a 15 year old boy sending me a message and messaging me. Hey, Uncle, do you want to come down and play ball? No, I'm like, wow. That's awesome. That's nice. Yeah, communities have changed during this time that some people have remembered Communities again, you know, whereas before it was everyone was a stranger and so that's a really cool thing. What about you, Tim? what's what's your distraction this week? I, I binge a little bit to finish off the first season of loci. Did I talk about that I talked about one division last time. I wonder I watched one division. That one got me like, I mean, I like sci fi stuff. But the lucky one I think is really interesting actually. It it's you got to keep going. But it's kind of interesting as to multiple timelines. That's kind of what what the idea is based on it's based on time and timelines. Which is really quite cool. And I watched one division and I was like, I was entertained and I was and it got kind of interesting and then it it was like it was a nice it was it was a bit irritating at the end but it but it was it was all right. It doesn't sound like something you want to get into that. Yeah, I wouldn't I irritated. Yeah, well, yeah, it was. Yeah, it was it was some nice twists and turns and, and it kept me watching but I yeah, I thought Loki was better. I've because I went on a on a cruise. I did miss as I was playing better catch up this week. And I didn't, I haven't seen some of the episodes. So I'm glad that there's more episodes coming out on those ones. I've got, I've got to be more careful of picking a show. That is still dribbling stuff out. I prefer to be able to binge when I get into it. So now I wait for only murders in the building. But there is a new episode out and I've worked out finally that they released them on that on Tuesdays. So talk about that Grayson Frankie launch their new season with only four episodes. I'm like, it's outrageous. How dare they, you know, decide one night viewings? Yeah, exactly. Right. So one of the things I've been watching This Week on Netflix again, that sort of seems to be where we always go, is history. 101. If you haven't had a chance to say it, I don't know how old it is. But it's really short, concise, and it's like the big, big stuff like nuclear energy, nuclear weapons, this aids, you know, from the beginning of the AIDS pandemic, it's where we are today. And all the issues that happened in between that we I think a lot of us would have forgotten about. But it's really really good if you know, I think sometimes if you just want to have a quick catch up on the big topics that matter. Going check out history when I one is it just the first season so I'm sure another season will come out. But it's it's beautifully produced. For today's sort of the way people seem to want to consume information. So an important stuff. Alright, so we're going to wrap it up. Wayne, thank you so much for joining us. I hope you enjoyed yourself, we always go a little bit longer than what we think but really appreciate having you here. If you don't know why. And he's great guy, go and check him out. Need an emcee for your event online events as well. He's great at what he does. If you want to be a guest on the no show, we were looking for somebody every week, reach out to any of us where we're having to have a chat. I upload these directly onto my podcast afterwards. So if you prefer to listen to this as an audio, it will be there within a couple of hours depending on how long it takes for Apple to get it out. But there we go. And that's it. We'll see you next week for the next show. goes on to say bye. Bye everyone. Wait. Yeah, thanks. Thanks for joining. Thanks for joining us. Thanks, Andrea. interesting topics this week, and we'll see and Joe says thanks, presumably. We'll see you all next week in the no show. Yeah. Awesome. All right, ending broadcast.