Uncommon Courage

The Know Show – theme: global unity, with Chris McDonald

September 17, 2021 Andrea T Edwards, Tim Wade, Joe Augustin and Chris McDonald Episode 11
Uncommon Courage
The Know Show – theme: global unity, with Chris McDonald
Show Notes Transcript

Welcome to The Know Show. Every week, Andrea T Edwards, Joe Augustin and Tim Wade, review the news that’s getting everyone’s attention, as well as perhaps what requires our attention. We’ll talk about what it means to us, the world and we hope to inspire great conversations on the news that matters to all of us. 

This week we’ll be joined by Chris McDonald, hotel general manager, former MMA fighter, and a man who’s paying attention. Our theme this week is: how do we work to create more unity in a divided world? Something we must address, because without it, we have no chance of overcoming the challenges facing all life on earth. 

The Know Show is based on Andrea T Edwards Weekend Reads, and covers the climate crisis, Covid 19, topical moments in the world, global politics, business, social issues and passion/humor/history. Join us. 

Unknown:

All right. Welcome to the no show. My name is Andrea Edwards. And I'm Joel Gustin. And I'm Tim Wade. Welcome to the show. And we appear to be missing out guest Chris McDonald, but he's trying to get in. So hopefully it'll be here soon. But maybe we can have a bit of an update on teams adventures on the on the on the ocean this week. Oh, happy to. First of all, I just want to do a huge shout out to everybody on Royal Caribbean, you guys did a great job. And I've been on a couple of cruise lines in the last few months. Well, yeah, only a couple, actually two. And then one of them. One of them was was basically a floating poker machine, where everywhere you went, there was a poker machine. And this one was all class. I thought, I just thought it was fantastic. I'm not really comparing apples with apples, though, to be fair, because I did pay a little bit more for the Royal Caribbean one to have a bigger room and bit more fancy pants sort of concierge, taking care of us. sweet stuff. But but the price is great for that. And I do it again, in a couple of months time, which I am. We have an incredible upselling machine. I've been through the process, it finally gets you into something very nice. You're like, Oh, I paid quite a bit for this great. Yeah, but you know, all I want is I want to, I want a really relaxed, great experience of engagement, entertainment, and great food. With my family. That's what I want. What I don't want is to be queuing up not being able to get into places being told no, you know, I don't mind not being able to get into places, but I just want to book everything beforehand, know what I can get into what I can't get into and just and then go going, Okay, well, if I can do that, I can do this. That's fine. But what I don't want to do is to stand somewhere for 45 minutes waiting to get in and told at the end of that I can't get in and that was the experience on on the nightmare cruises. But sounds like a bit of a Disney experience to me. I'm just going to give Chris the heads up that he's here and we're going to bring him in. So just give him a chance to get prepared. I think he can hear what we're saying. Yeah, we can see you will and we'll bring you in to make sure you're ready. Yeah, but look, you know, you got to take a break and any any break away from no melody right now, I think especially at this point in the pandemic really helps your mindset right. Yeah, and you don't forget the pandemic at all on the cruise because you know, you ever and masked up and everything else. And of course you have to go through swabs and tests and everything to get on board but but I don't know, I just thought it was handled really well. And I just I've, I've I've spoken on Royal Caribbean a lot. I hadn't actually been a guest on it like this for a while. And, and it was great. So I'm, I'm I love it. But let's bring Chris in because I don't think he's ever been online straight livestream before. So you might be thinking what the hell's going on here? But let's bring him in. You guys haven't met him? Hello, darling. Hey guys, we do. I'll just I'll give you a brief intro cuz, Tim Ah, I don't know you. But he's a former MMA fighter. And he's currently training my boys to be fighters as well, which is awesome. And he's doing an amazing job at kids. But he's also a hotel General Manager in Phuket. So you can imagine he's been quite impacted by everything that's been going on in the last nine months because the whole hospitality industry has been decimated. But yeah, welcome, Chris. It's really good to have you. Thanks for having me. All the research I've been doing about this guy who's the American actor is completely off mark. Oh, you did some research? No, I I was trying to I was trying to find I was trying to find you. But obviously we have to talk about SEO and stuff like that. Because every time I search for your name, I promise American Actor instead. Yeah. Yes. From Happy Gilmore. Oh, yeah. So Chris McDonald, you scroll after a couple of pages and manual get me but you're right, you got to sort out your SEO because I've got a a an Android with an American actress that I compete with for the front page. So I'm, I'm usually up there with her. She gets more of the visuals I get more of the written spat. You can also look for Chris to Batman because that's his fighting name. And he comes up the top of the research when you look for that but Chris, give us a give us a brief story of your life. So if I get to know you a bit. I'm from Northern Ireland. My wife is Jamaican. I lived in Northern Ireland until I was 28 and then moved to Jamaica, my wife. We lived there for eight years and then we've we've we moved here And love it here we came here to work for dream hotel Resort and Spa. And also did some side training to Tiger muy Thai in my spare time. But yeah, we have two kids and a dog Isaac and I and and Rufus the dog. And yeah, that's that's really it. Come on, what about the MMI? Because most people will be most interested in that. Really? But, uh, yeah, so I turned professional. I broke my ankle playing football or soccer, as they call it when I was 28. And I took up MMA, thinking that would be better, because I enjoyed. Yeah, yeah. And basically, I used to have a good friend of mine. His father was a policeman that used to take us to box when we were eight to 10 years old, just as the discipline of the training. So I've always did the boxing aspect of it. And then I get into the MMA aspect in Northern Ireland. And then when I moved to Jamaica, I thought it was over. And I got a phone call from Trinidad and Tobago that said, Hey, we have shows Would you like to come and fight on them? So I went down there, and on my second fight, they give me a fight for the belt. And I held that belt for about five years until I started getting sponsors and or training and I trained in Indiana, how to coach from Indiana, come down to Jamaica, and I would got the Indiana. So it was a nice little swap there, which I think I lost out on going to the snow instead of some. But yeah, so I did that for 10 years fought in Europe for the China. One a couple of belts ended up in HBO for a bit on a DVD cover. And, and that was really it. Yeah. Yeah. And MMA. Just in case people don't know. Mixed Martial Arts. So it's a it's a combination of all the arts, whether it's karate wrestling, Brazilian jujitsu, boxing, you basically put it all together to see who's the best all around. fighter per se. Being the safe option. Yeah. If you ever see Chris down a dark alley, you're taking seriously? Yeah, yeah, I don't make sure your kids don't say my dad can beat up your dad. Yeah. I'm not anymore. Many dark alleys this day. So the odds of that happening is very rare. But let's see. And the hotel tell us about the hotel. I'm still involved with it, we've been closed now for due to the pandemic pandemic, we've been closed now for over a year, probably about 1617 months. So it's been, it was quite a battle, you know, what ahead hit us all of a sudden, and, you know, came during the high season. So we lost a bit of the high season that we used to pay a lot of staff and it was, so we went down to a skeleton crew and you know, just kept running that way. And it was, but yeah, like, you know, the fact that some of the hotels here still running well done to them. But it's good to have that backing, I guess. But with us, it just wasn't that wasn't the case. So I'm still involved in that way. I, you know, I worked for the owner. I still do stuff for him. But on a very small scale. Now. This is why I started the better youth camps for kids here and to try and move on. Yeah, but it's been it's been quite poor, to be honest. Yeah, it's really tough. Yeah, I'm really I'm looking at other hotels as well in the sandbox. And, you know, you know, the sandbox, they say it's working. It's good, good to have people coming in. But there's so many hotels here wanted a piece of the pie, that we're seeing a lot more hotels, no dropping off and dropping off and dropping off. So hopefully, it gets better soon. But even with that, I don't I don't see that. I think we're going to lose another high season, which made me the aim and for many hotels. So you know, yeah, yeah, you're really, really good. Someone's got a car going? Anyone? Not Not me this time. All right, I can hear you echoing but it's not happening here. I don't think Okay, nevermind, what do you think must be doubly important to go on? Yeah. It's been, we really see it in such a, the economic impact of COVID which, you know, I think in a place like Singapore, you're definitely seeing it. But here it's, it's brutal. Like it's absolutely brutal, what's going on, and just the impact it's having on all of us, you know, and but especially people working here in the hospitality industry, and then obviously, the wider community like I've just had to put a big call out for funding to get to buy more food because people are, people are starving, right? And it's hard. It's hard. Being here isn't a curse, just witnessing the impact and then you see what's going on around the rest of the world and the lack of action to stop this and it sort of makes it that the despair just keeps growing right? Yeah, yeah. I mean, the thing I like to think about here as well, which I find quite interesting when I used to train a tiger muy Thai that that that street know that street used to be the busiest street in Thailand, with all the gyms there and everything going on, and you go up there as decimated it's I mean, it's almost like Laguna is the busiest place in Thailand now, because maybe it has the most sustainable expats. But yeah, you go over there now and even even obviously, today, you know, it's just absolutely dead. So sad to see you know, all these young people used to flow fluid in to get fit and I know there's nothing you'll have people a couple of people have stayed not set, you know, pretty sad. So when, when, when Thailand opened up in Phuket opened up again, the Muay Thai fights are gonna be like fat people fighting against each other. Right? Yeah. That moment. Yeah. But it's really it is really tough. And it's, it is frustrating. to, to, like Andrea was saying, Just see some parts of the world just opening up pretending nothing's even happening. And then, you know, and it's back to normal sort of feeling well, well with other countries are really struggling. It's Can I get an audible think about technical stuff right now? It's a crispy if we could just have your volume turned down just a little bit on your cyber speakers. I think that's what's coming back on our on our station. Yeah. Better. We'll find out that it. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. All right. You want to get stuck into the news that struck a chord this week? Let's do it. Yeah. Well, I'm sure most of you guys might have been sort of more focused on the Met Gala and the extraordinary fashion this week. I was looking elsewhere. Yeah, and there are a couple of good stories. One good story. One bad story out of that. Billy Eilish, I don't know if you guys heard the story. She only agreed to work with Oscar de la Renta if they stopped using for. And of course, then we had the lovely Kim Kardashian. Did you see her dress? No, no, no, one of you guys saw her dress Anyway, she is covered hit head to toe in black, including her face, right. And when I saw it, I thought it was really it was a fantastic opportunity to, for her to stand up and speak out for women's rights, especially in Afghanistan. Right? That now. Apparently, it was all about her, and was about her being recognizable even when you can't see her face. So I missed opportunity. But anyway, I am not paying attention to the fashion on the strange moment when Kim Kardashian draws attention to herself just so I know that I I used to say I miss I missed the times when the Kardashians were the worst thing we had to listen to. I vote we never talked about them again. AI. Alright. Alright, so but the main idea you guys Anything to add on the amygdala fashions? There's some great stories. Interesting, quirky. I don't even know what it is. So I and I'm quite happy not to. I want to stay. I don't want to be in the know for this one. Okay, all right. Well, there's plenty of in the know, in my community. Anyway. So as you guys probably know, new cycles are something that really fascinate me. I'm a bit of a weirdo for that. And for the last month, Afghanistan, and then the 20th anniversary of 911, obviously took the lead news. And while that certainly hasn't gone away, definitely we see COVID back in the lead. And there's a lot of different reasons for that. It feels it feels different this time with COVID. You know, I always find that when main news has some time off. When we saw that with the environment news, when COVID first happened, there was about three months before people started to share the environment news again. But because when it comes back, it's different. It's deeper, it's more thoughtful, it's less reactive. So it's like the people who are creating the content have taken more time. They're not just reacting to the news cycle in constantly like they are so but the other thing that I believe that's happening with COVID and why it's back is the stage that we're at in this pandemic. So last week, we were talking about Singapore on what Singapore should do. And obviously, there's a lot of desire in the community to move forward because of the high vaccination rates. And we also talked about the Israel outbreak, and I've been looking into that more this week. And the challenge in Israel was that the majority of the people who got COVID, in this recent months of outbreak, we're actually vaccinated. So that's why it's created hesitancy around the world. But the challenge that Israel faced is that they basically flung their doors open just as the Delta storm arrived, and the chain of infection started in the school kids and spread to the parents. So in September, they've seen daily all time high infection rates of 16,000. And they're now rolling out boosters, which they claim are 10 times more effective against the viruses It is today. But the challenge is there's been loads of data challenges with this particular piece of news, which has created a lot of misinformation. And the main thing is, everyone's packaging all the information up for everybody, rather than breaking it down to the different age groups and the different impacts, right. So when when the data actually got broken down, it showed that the vaccine was more than 90% effective at protecting severe disease, ie people under 50. And more than 85% effective in those over 50. And the chance of being hospitalized if you're over 60 is reduced 40 fold if you're vaccinated compared to if you're not vaccinated. Right. So that's where Israel is right now. But that story has really had a big impact around the world. And I know the Singapore government's been paying attention to it. Any anyone else got any other sort of thoughts on that Israel big paying attention? How what was the response? Like from the anti vaxxers? Are they like I told you so the vaccine doesn't work or, or they? That's where the challenge with the data being missing, Miss misinterpreted came up. And it's a highly vaccinated society. That the other problem is they've got a very high population of pink kids, the kids under 12 is a really, really high percentage. So the actual total vaccination rate is in the 60%. It's not in the 80%. So that's another issue with with Israel. So you can't you know, like, we've all got to be aware of this. You can't compare every country because it's not all the same, right? Yeah. Yeah. Statistical trick that happens when you when you when you don't consider the whole thing like that. The idea is basically like, we could always just announced in Singapore, you're more likely to get COVID from a Chinese person, which would be true, but not because it's more likely to hit Chinese people. It's just that we were there more of us around, right. So there's the same idea about vaccinated versus unvaccinated Israel is that society, Singapore is becoming a society as well. But if you're going to catch something from someone, there's a pretty good chance they're going to be a vaccinated person as well. And I think Israel's is really is the demonstration of where the the thinking has to change, because it used to be very much something you didn't have to worry about the kids getting. And Delta's basically said, Sorry, the rules have changed. Yeah. Yeah, don't mess with a virus, basically. But okay, so then let's look around. So we, we say countries like the US and countries across Europe, they're getting back to normal. And I think everyone knows that normals a long way. I've always said it's a two year cycle that we have to get get through. And there was an interesting piece, I think it was Bloomberg. That said, we've got six months minimum ahead of us before we can expect anything even close to normal. And I just want to encourage everyone to get your head around that if you can, if you can accept that, like March next year, hopefully, we can move forward a little bit. It helps you to cope. But that doesn't take into account that a new variant could emerge. There could be vectored vaccine resistant, and then you know, we're in a whole new mess. And this is a high probability probability, right? Because we've got so much virus out worldwide, and who knows what's going to happen, but there was this one really compelling quote in a Bloomberg article. And it said, this is a Coronavirus, forest forest fire that will not stop until it finds all the human wood that it can burn. I thought that was a very apt comment in considering what else is going on around the world. Just jump in if you want to add anything, guys, right. The other thing is COVID is shaping up to be one of the more more severe pandemics historically. And all indications are showing that it's not going to follow the same path as pandemics have in the past. And of course, this creates a lot more uncertainty. You know, when we look at the 1918 pandemic, therefore, we're going to do this, this, this, this, that's not necessarily going to happen. So getting back to Singapore, if it opens, now, it opens in the heat of the Delta storm. And that's where Israel got it wrong. We're always at least two weeks behind the virus and what's going on with the virus. That's our understanding of actually where it is in the community. It's an invisible threat. And obviously, the Singapore government's being cautious. It's done so much for so long to keep its community safe. And you know, why risk it now? Because, as he Israeli said, If you let Delta get out of control, it's very, very difficult to get it back under control. And I shared with you guys an article, Singapore should make COVID-19 jobs mandatory so measures can be ease for all which was published in the straight times this week. The title of the article was actually quite different to the content in the article. Did you have a chance to have a read of it? Not that one. I'll confess to summarizing it from the from the article and tacos I met so many people with that the same perspective. So I'm guilty. I'm one of those guilty people who saw the headline and thought, I think, Well, I know what this is all about. Ah, yeah. Right. Yeah. So subeditors and, and then journalists are different people. Right? And yeah, I was, I was fine. The Straits Times whatever the headline is, that's the government. That's the government ambition. And it's just, it's just testing the waters, you know. So but this this is a piece that's not really it's an opinion piece, right? It's not something that is it's not based entirely on reporting and someone's perspective and putting forward an idea, right. But then you I think it was the finance minister who's quoted in the articles or the health minister, one of them. And it's just basically saying Singapore is going to be cautious there. They're looking around, they've learnt the lessons. They're in the middle of the Delta storm in Southeast Asia, and they and they're going to be they're asking everyone to be cautious for a few weeks longer, until they really understand if they're in the right position. Sorry, what lessons? are they learning? No, this is this is the thing that gets Apple I was I didn't focus on our ego, but I watched Greece, a lot happened on Greece this week, about the anti anti backers and out on the streets, and whatever the deal is. And, you know, when we say we're learning lessons from this thing, you have all these people in these countries that do not want to get the vaccine. So when these people are saying is going to be mandatory like this, this is where defies common sense for me to hold because it keeps changing every week. And then you have the whether it's, you know, whether you're out the vaca, or, or vaccine, they all have completely different beliefs anyway. So I just find myself when I'm looking at these countries, and they've learned from this, it seems like the countries like America and the UK that that all these people burn and die due to COVID are now all opened up and living normally. And do I know they definitely aren't America friends over there. I watched a football game the other day with 60,000 people. And I think I spotted two people with a mask in the crowd. Right? And then we're talking about Singapore, where they're going to be more cautious is to caution just yeah, wait until your vaccine and then we're going to open up because you're still going to get COVID or what are the what is the caution? Well, the thing is, Singapore is one of those countries that can make vaccines mandatory, and it will do it and get away with it. Right. Whereas another country like the US can't, we are one of the stories that the French have suspended healthcare workers this week. And I thought there'd be a lot more pushback on that. But it looks it looks like you know, there's a lot more people that are saying, Yeah, fair enough. So I feel for the angle for Singapore, and probably the world is everyone gets vaccinated, and then we open up. Now, I don't think it's ever going to get out yet. Well, what I'm saying is that these people are getting vaccinated, still, we still have to quarantine for two weeks. So life is just gonna be wary of the vaccine or not, life is just going to be disruptive. And continuing, continuing continuing. It's all about the Israel example that I nursing that Singapore is watching, it's all about looking at the hospitalizations and the ICU beds. Right, it's just been cautious is asking for a couple more weeks just to make sure they've got everything in alignment, they've done everything they can to get as many people vaccinated, and they'll be ready to go soon, but they're not gonna they're not going to, they're not gonna open the gates fast. The challenge is we, I mean, I would have thought the challenges were happy now that we've got to this sort of 95% of people over 12 or as we're approaching that number anyway, 95% of people over 12 is about 80 something percent of the total population. So So heading up heading up to because of about half a million people on aged under 12. So with, with that, if we if we like, okay, we're vaccinated, we're good to go and we fly into the middle of unvaccinated disaster area, that's not going to do anybody any good at all, because that person is going to come back, possibly with everything, and needs to be quarantined and stuff like that. So that's the challenge with the quarantine. Is that even though because we're surrounded by countries that are in a mess, so, so it's tough for Singapore to just open up? And what does opening up mean? Does it mean we're opening up to everybody to come here? Does it doesn't mean we're opening up to all all the people who are sick somewhere else that don't trust their healthcare system that want to get a Singapore and get treatment in Singapore because they can afford it and whatever it is, and they come in here. So then it's, it's, it's like, Can Singapore, cope with that? Health refugees really, in a sense? Yeah. Can Can Singapore cope with that and while also being able to handle its own populations needs, and then of course, the other thing is, so what's more likely is we'll open up to places where they seem to have done what we've done. So that's why we've got Brunei and Germany, you know, as as places to to go to The moment we've got some sort of arrangement with those two, but it's all governments, they're just trying to navigate what's the best path ahead for our country? Right. So we've just got a Gloria who popped up a couple of weeks ago. I don't know, Gloria, I don't know if any of you guys and her question is, are you pushing vaccines, and I'm not pushing anything. I, I personally think that vaccines look like the way out of it. I, if people choose not to do to have a vaccine, I'm not going to give them a hard time unless it's like someone like my brother who was in high risk. But you know, we're just reading everything that we're reading, following the data. And it looks like one of the best parts for us to get out of this crisis. He's through vaccines, but that's just the way I look at it, but it's not pushing anything. So what do you got? Yeah, my Go ahead, Joe. Now, well, I mean, for me, I'm the data guy and the Science Guy. And I really try to look at things and go by the facts, right, and I can at the same time, I understand people's feelings. So I understand anti vaxxers, I have two people in my family I three people in my in my own family, not here in Singapore, but back home in Australia, who are not vaccinated. And they have varying degrees and reasons for it. One's completely valid because they have a medical condition, which makes it very dangerous for them to approach it that way. Two of them have their misgivings when they ended. And they're both totally different in their approach. But purely from a science point of view and a statistical point of view, if we're going to take a step out of the MLS and I look at this from a from a large population point of view, taking board all the risks, we have to look at vaccines as the best thing that that's going to do this. And even if we say you know what, let's, let's throw some math, which is completely taken out of the air here. Let's say one and 100 people die from the vaccine, this is just put that as a, as a as an accepted risk in that situation. And that is going to change. I'm sorry that the number is way too big. But I was what what I'm saying is, if we assume that, that taking the vaccine has its accompanying risks, we know that we're going to have some trouble with it along the way. But the the big picture is that it's going to make, it's going to make a difference. And it's going to make the rest of what kind of needs to happen as we move along possible. So that we can begin to it's not even about and I think about normal as well as the new. It's not going to go back to normal. I don't think we're going to come back to a place it should. It shouldn't come back to a place where we think that face to face no masks and not watching your personal hygiene is something you should you should put aside, we do have to move to a place where I think it would be it'd be advisable. I think some of the people in Japanese culture who wore masks even before COVID are just a normal thing. And there's a how to how to behave. If you feel a little unwell. I think that's a good thing. I think we should take that on board. We should make that part of the future. But I think the thing about vaccines Yeah, I'm with all the signs of I am I am pushing for vaccines. I know. It comes with the risk. Now I understand how you feel about it. Like I'm pushing vaccines. Yeah, yeah. I just want the people who are suffering the most to stop suffering the most, because of this pandemic and the economic crisis it's created. And if vaccines are the pathway to solving that, then pushing is the wrong word. It's just not it's just I believe that's our path. And that's what I think if other people think differently, I'm cool with that, too. Right? It's, you know, that's the whole point. Right? We all have different ideas. But But I guess like on that, sorry, sorry, Tim. I mean, while people are getting COVID with the vaccine, because they have it, they're still rushing to the hospital, that hospital anyway. So the whole point of, you know, getting the vaccine, the decrease, I guess it must just be dead because not hospitalizations, your hospitals are still going to be you're still gathering people getting it and going there and then having to quarantine. So this is where I don't see the problem. But honestly, I was pro vaccine, I got my vaccine. I think that you know, if you want to travel, I think like when it comes to the science, I think, you know if that's the case, then yeah, I definitely I'm definitely pushing vaccines I've actually had, I actually had a bit of a negative situation with an anti anti vaccine guy at a supermarket here just in Thailand, who refused to wear his mask refused to, you know, tell him that if you get a vaccine, you're this, this and that and seems to be the attitude. But I think CFD wise I'm not sure if I have any underlying illnesses or whatever the deal is, so when they said your vaccines there, and you need your vaccine to do A, B and C i guess i was a sheep and I went and got my vaccine. So yeah, so that's that's basically my thoughts on it. Or a lion. Because you're more alone, but yeah, but like I said, I think it's, I think around a country, whether it's war or anything else, you're always going to be people that want this and people that don't want that. And that's what the facts progress. And that's definitely what's affecting progress in America, where you have all these fights and street marches on the vaccine and vaccine. So the smart play, I think, to me would be get the vaccine and just move on. I didn't have many side effects or anything from it. And I'm only speaking from personal experience. So apparently, the boosters so most people in tonight get sinovac and apparently the boosters which we're going to be getting soon, apparently, they absolutely knock you out for days. So we're bracing ourselves for that when it comes up. So but again, I'd like to see the the science on that because I know like, for example, my brother had AstraZeneca. And he about asthma. So he really struggled for three days. Yet I know other people with AstraZeneca. That Haven't I know other people that are not, you know, say are not health conscious, or, you know, as fit as maybe as they should be. I've heard more complaints, just a my first experience with people getting, you know, more side effects from a lot of the health conscious peoples I've hung out with it. Just haven't been that way at all. Maybe that's baloney. Yeah. I my personal experience from so I'd like to see like who else gets the boosters. And you know that, again, even the boosters knew. So what is the science on it? You know, all right, James, you want to jump in? I was simply going to say, look, I think our our short term world is going to be an apartheid of some degree, where where there's going to be privileges afforded to those with vaccines and denial to those without or the cost of the same, the same sort of experience will be higher for those without For example, let's say that we're all flying again, I wouldn't be surprised if there were flights that were for vaccine only people, and then others, which were mixed that were either, you know, that had a different cost profile, perhaps. So it's a lot of work. But I but look on the cruise ship, anybody who was unvaccinated were had to was not allowed to eat at any of the restaurants. They had to have their meals delivered to their rooms. And they were eating their rooms. But there were shows and entertainment available to them. So we had a purple wristband for those people purple wristband, they were purple wristband shows, and everybody shows. And they recommended we go to the purple wristband shows those people who were vaccinated. But if you wanted to go to the other one, or miss the purple wristband show, because the numbers or whatever it was, then you could go to the, you know, everybody's in that show. So it's I, I, the only logical thing is it's going to be a little bit of of that, as we navigate forward, I do think we will come out of wearing masks and stuff like that, of course. So I think it's really happening now in lots of parts of the world. I think we're gonna end up there. I think we're about 18 months away, to be honest, the marches would be great, but I'm thinking I'm thinking next year, we're still like this, but hopefully businesses are running. Because that's the biggest fallout of this one. And when when I say March, it's more that's sort of a timeline, I think towards ci cycle. But, you know, the 1918 pandemic was five years, right. So, ma squarings, especially in Asia, I think it will definitely continue for longer. Yeah. So the day Yeah, so I mean, that's, that's, that's how I see it probably happening with that, too. You know, your back. And so what that might be even economically more expensive for those people who are receiving unvaccinated. There may be a portion of me decide to go Ah, screw it. I'm getting cheaper from this. Can we just try something crazy? When you're not talking when you're talking? See if it's you. Yeah, I'm hearing that I go. Alright, let's see you muted and now if I sing something from an opera, it should not sound operatic. Yeah, it could be it could be it. Alright. So let's continue with unmute when you say something new. Yeah, exactly. just continuing around the world. There's loads of stuff going on like Australia. It's obviously getting some really mixed messages being Australian watching my family and through my friends eyes. You know, the state government's sort of calling the shots. The Federal Government's coming in over the top but it's out into the communities in the countryside, where a lot of the usually leave it in the Aboriginal community. We talked about that last week. And, you know, the New South Wales Government with with the highest cases are just making some crazy announcements which you know, like, you know, threatening their borders. It's just, it's really, really crazy what's going on in Australia. And it's not helping and there's a real between the federal, the state and the media. They're just creating so much division in the country that's actually harming the people in the country. And it's actually really quite sad to watch. Southern states of the US states like Texas are seeing 95% or more of the ICU beds occupied and obviously mostly unvaccinated is the Delta storm continues. Did you see governor Newsome prevails in the California recall where they are basically trying to kick him out? Yeah, yeah. But so that's ridiculous waste of money. Yeah, but the big pipe the big news that for me that that really mattered was by not being kicked out. Not only did the environmentalists actually do our primary support it but but not being kicked out at send a message to other leaders around the country, that are going hard on lockdowns going hard to try and tackle COVID is something that the people actually want. So it's actually been a boost, especially for the Democrats. Canada is experiencing a massive surge again, it's called, you know, it's the unvaccinated and Alberta is having a really rough time, the UK has announced that it's going to be aggressively seeking to vaccinate the teenagers because obviously, they looked around the world and a lot of the infections are coming through the children. I talked about the French suspending healthcare workers without pay, they're not sacked, but they're suspended. And I just think that this sort of thing is going to keep coming. Putin's inner circle and Russia has many, many of them have got COVID he's now in isolation. And with the Russian election coming up, I'm sure that's going to sort of make it make for interesting times. Around the world, there are more and more kids in hospital with serious COVID complications as well as pregnant women that like on on the you know, they've got the tubes down their throat, even the gorillas at the Atlanta zoo. 18 out of 20 of them have got COVID it's pretty new news. We don't know if they're going to be alright. And of course, Nicki Minaj came out this week and has been hammered for it. Apparently her cousin in Trinidad. Trinidad sorry, won't get the cat the vaccine because his friend got it and became impotent. With his testicles becoming swollen. I always find a friend of a friend is worth listening to, by the way. So anyway, that's creating some some headlines, of course. And just a final point, there's a lot of misinformation out there. There always has been since the beginning of this, and it's something I've been commenting on for a long time. But also, a lot of reporting around reactions to vaccines, the longer it goes on, the more of this is going to happen. A lot of what I'm reading is not peer reviewed research yet, until it becomes peer reviewed, please don't panic, pay attention wait for the peer reviewed, it's really, really important that it becomes peer reviewed. That's when you know it's worth listening to. Just as a small example, a great friend who also tracks news sent me an article that 12 to 15 year old boys are having cardiac events on Pfizer. And obviously, I've got that's the age group of my boys and you can write well that's that's that's pretty, that's pretty serious, right? It hasn't been peer reviewed. It's a tiny, tiny percentage. But you know, as my boys have the opportunity to get their Pfizer injection with this, which they're super keen on getting, it's something that we have to be aware of. So this is the time for us all to wait to listen, to be patient to wait for the scientists to peer review the research. And we really need to be using our critical thinking right now friend of a friend doesn't cut it. We've got a we've got to gotta get ourselves out of this mess. And this is a big part of is getting ourselves out of this mess. So that's the COVID News back back front and center this week. Good. I mean, are you guys are you sure you guys still here and I put my headphones on. Are you still here? Oh God. Now Yeah, cool. Now we can eat only two of you. Now Oh, good. Oh, good. Yeah, you know, if I have to go and get up, if I have to go and get a surgery, I'm probably going to go to to a hospital somewhere to get this surgery done. And I'm probably going to go to somebody who knows what they're talking about. Probably somebody who's been trained, understands medical stuff. And, and, you know, they're gonna cut me open, they're gonna suggest I have a couple of jabs and, and, you know, there's I count to 10 backwards and stuff. I probably gonna listen to them. Then Then some idiots friends boyfriends, lodge testicular arrangement, although that's before we go and get the jab filing I want to I want to throw a little bit in there as well about about this thing about going to doctors as well. And this is going to sound like a terrible thing to say. But it is the problem when, when even within the scientific community and working with scientific community and the medical community, we assume medical community is up to date. And that is something that you really have to not take for granted. Because what's happening right now, especially with genetic science, is that they're actually saying when the when the when the geneticists are talking about things, they're saying, don't just listen to your doctor, because doctors were brought up on a different science at the time. And they form their opinions and what they feel about things based on that older set of assumptions and fears. So the doctors who are who are out there right now being really really, the proponents of the data, say things like the dangers of the vaccine and stuff and all that. They taking fears that they had 20 years ago, when when some of this genetic stuff was new, and that they have been, I guess, building building the confirmation bias on since then, they're bringing those old fears into the new times. Right, so not understanding how things work. Like just I'll give you a quick example with the with the vaccines and the fact that the mRNA vaccines, right. And people talk about how it changes your genes, it goes in there, and it does all of that. And the fact is, it doesn't, what it does, what mRNA does actually is it's a kind of message is a lesson that comes into your system, it teaches your body a lesson. And then literally what happens to mRNA is that it disappears, it actually breaks down, which is why the vaccines have to be stored at the temperatures that they do because they are so fragile, they will actually disappear and stop being what they are. So people don't take that and understand how that works. And then they applied to this thing they attend the idea that this vaccine is going to go into your system is going to change your genes, when really it can't, it can't change your genes, it can leave a message behind it can leave a lesson behind. So it's someone coming into your house with a library book, giving you the library book, so you can experience it. And then you go Okay, then I'm leaving now. And that's and that's basically it. But you have people who are on the other hand, who have this older fears, because they didn't know how genetics was really going to work. And they have this great idea that Oh, we're gonna go in there and change things. And it makes a huge differences and irreparable damage. The geneticists are trying to make those kinds of things happen. But in a benevolent way, they're trying to use CRISPR CRISPR is still very, very early and how it's doing its own changes and all that so that the technology is nowhere close to the kinds of ability that people are worried about in terms of what these vaccines can do. And so you have to think about what your doctors are saying as well and where their fears I was thinking about the idea, this idea about updating your fears, you know, yes, we shouldn't be fearful. But if we are going to hold on to some fears, we should at least update and say well, what's the is this the Am I am I subscribed to fear 2.0 Why should I be on fear? 5.0 right now based on new science, that's interesting. That's why my surgeon is Doogie Howser. There's a new one the African why the Hawaiian one. She's a anyway, whatever. So okay. Well, it's a really interesting point that die made about the medical professional, you know, like, so we have a, we have a trust crisis. And we've had a trust crisis for a very long time. And we don't trust governments, business, charities, or the media, right. So the five communities of trust, the most trusted people are our family, our friends, our social media connections, influences on social media, so bloggers, that sort of thing. And colleagues, so the people closest to us in our life are the people that we trust the most, right? So that's why I always say you got to speak up, you got to get on social media, you got to put your point of view out there, you've got to share information that you believe is relevant to the community, especially in a situation like this, right? If enough of us speak up and say, Come on, guys. We're going to get some consensus here. It looks like the best part is this. Let's go. And if enough of us do it and convince enough of us to come, maybe we'll get to the end of it. But at the same time, this is a time to put a little bit of trust in people who've spent a decade at university versus someone who didn't even fail who failed to attend science. Right. You know, we've got it, we've got a sort of, you know, sort of that's that's some way that's somehow I got to make it to the mainstream though. That's the problem. You know, like you're not here, not enough on television, radio, or even social media. It's usually a fight on social media, that somebody agrees to this and doesn't agree with that. It wasn't the information. We were just given there, which I find quite interesting. You know, I listened to that all day. You know if it was on if I could switch on CNN, but uh, fortunately, they they're not going that way anymore, or even BBC, but like I said mainstream media they need to push that more you know they Dr. Fight cheese and all these guys who you don't hear from them nowhere near enough you're hearing from these news anchors when you should be hearing from the actual you should do a whole show just on the specialists right now what we're going through, but that's not the case everyone has an agenda. Yeah, yeah, I mean the media is responsible for so much at the moment, you know, and you guys, you know, I was talking to my sister about a country like Australia where sort of 80 90% is, is controlled, not so 65%, Murdock, and then some other groups, right. But it's right, right wing controlled. So the left wing don't really feel like they've got a voice in society. So I say, Well, if you're not represented in the, in the dialogue in your country, then you have to be part of the dialogue in your country. But even if you're happy that your your perspective is being represented, if you're a right wing person, if the left wing don't have a voice in their country, that's not a good thing. So we need to get that role. Just the balance back, you know, the 5050 balance back. And then he said that we can start listening to each other a little bit more. But it's it's this the extremes and the divisions have just gotten wider and wider, which we're going to talk about in a minute. And it's so damaging. Do you want to join a jump onto the climate crisis? Big week? big week for the climate crisis? We are ready. All right. Yep. There's a new report that showing it's not just young people who care about the climate crisis. In fact, the demographic that cares the most is Generation X, which is my generation. I think that's teams as well. Joe? Yeah, you I'm a millennial guys, and catching up to you guys. Yes, definitely not my guys. Yeah. The boomers aren't so bad either. If they get they get a lot of Chris, they get a lot of criticism. But the point is that this message has been very damaging to moving forward because everyone thinks that nobody else cares. And actually, some of the some of the generations that cared the least are actually the younger ones. So I thought that was an interesting one. Another headline to meet the Paris accord goal, most of the world's fossil fuel reserves must stay in the ground. So there's a new study in nature reports that oil gas and coal production must begin falling immediately to have even a 50% chance of keeping global temperatures from rising more than 1.5 degrees Celsius and 1.5 puts a large part of the of the Earth at a too hot to live. Another report, it's estimated that roughly 90% of the world's population lives in areas where pollution levels exceed World Health Organization limits 90%. a record number of environmental activists have been murdered for protecting all of our futures. This is also a matching a rise in the number of journalists being killed. The world is now saying twice as many days at 50 degrees Celsius, and it has doubled in the last 40 years, won the elections this week in Norway, the center Left Party as one, that the anti oil greens have basically been sidelined. So the focus on the economy versus the future continues to be a big issue in elections. We've got to get ready for a future without oil and gas. But the the elections aren't reflecting this because people want to protect the economy today, because obviously we're in a bad place economically right now. And moving forward. It's people aren't ready to ready to do what they need to do and make the sacrifice I need to make. Do you guys want to comment? There's another big chunk I want to share anything? Yep, no. Well, there was a there was a very specific about about how, how you can make people care more, and I do I do work besides COVID. I also do work with the longevity folks. And I think one of the things that becomes very easy to ignore is what you think, Well, I'm not going to be around for this. And so a thought crossed my mind and said, Well, what if we made vaccination against aging? manage banditry? Just as a thought experiment, right? Just imagine if everybody who was on the planet right now knew they had to be around for another 50 years. Unless they checked out in some other way. I think it would change things quite a bit. I think if you if you knew that you had a longer life and not. And let's not think about this in the way we usually think about longer life you think about the old problems or person problems that you begin to feel right now you go I don't wonder 30 more years or 40 more years of this. The idea is interesting, isn't it? If you could cure aging curing aging would mean that your eyes would become youthful again. Your body and skin would become useful, useful again. And what were you what you would have? Is the shotgun array yourself with the experience of the older person? And if you can have all of that wrapped in that, wouldn't you want to live longer? And if you knew you have the opportunity to live longer, and then be smarter and wiser as you have this younger body, would you then not want to do a little bit more about making the environment around you nicer? Well, if you're 60 or younger, you will live long enough to see climate devastation. So it's only people above 60, that would potentially Well, they probably enjoy that opportunity to be younger and have younger skin and all that sort of good stuff, just like all of us would, but anyone, anyone below 60 is going to face the climate devastation. So yeah, you know, you know, I mean, in terms of how this, this feels for someone who is in their late 50s and 60s, right, that they're also going to face longevity, devastation in their personal life, so to speak. Right? And that's why it's not, I think, as big a problem as you think you think that? Well, if you're doing any kind of thinking about the future, where are you going to focus on are you going to be more concerned that your knees are giving out or at the trees are giving out, you know, your your attention is going to be much more about what's happening around you. So this, the folks in longevity could be a part of the answer as in like, they're working on things where, you know, for less than $1 a day is going to help you to extend your life by 20 years, 30 years, which sounds like a terrible thing, given the status quo. But just imagine if you would then become literally younger, there's so much amazing work that's being done there. I just thought to myself, wow, wouldn't be fantastic. If everyone right now, how much you would change the equation. You know, there's some people being involved. And I think, you know, people people get to about 5060 sometimes, and then they go like, you know what, it's just too much. There's no point. There's no point in doing this. I've, you know, life's too short. Literally, that's what they say. So what if life isn't too short? What have you became longer? Just the idea of it becoming something had just Yeah. Like, yeah, if you were mentioning CRISPR earlier, which is the whole changing of the DNA, right? So my boys want to have wings and stuff, you know, through Crisco, and I'm like, man, but I don't know, we so focused on living longer that we're not focused on living today. So yeah, it to me that's, that's a discussion, I'd love to tell them that if they do get the wings DNA, though, it will take quite long and so it would be very awkward as the route is big, stripy strapping men with small little sprouty wings coming. Alright, so another critical report. I mean, obviously, the UN Glasgow climate or cop 26 is coming up in November. And it's being billed as where the future of humanity is going to be discussed. And it's, it's a very important time because we we've had many of these meetings before that haven't really done anything. And you know, we had the Paris Climate deal that, you know, no one's really doing anything about. So another report that came out that showing most nations are failing, or short or very short, falling very short in plans to curb warming. In fact, the only nation on Earth that looks like they're going to get under 1.5 is a country called Gambia in Africa. The UK is the only industrialized nation that's getting open close. The United States, European Union, Germany and Japan, insufficient and more in line with global warming of three degrees Celsius, India and China are pushing towards a four degree world, Brazil and Mexico both gone backwards in their fight to curb warming. India, Russia, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore and Thailand are on the bottom of the list. So that just gives you a feel for where we've gone since the parents Paris deal. So like, you know, it's hard to stay hopeful when these these things keep happening. But a four degree world I shared a map on one of my Facebook groups, it's not a pretty world, we don't want to go there. Another report that there are 200 million climate refugees expected by 2050. I actually think that's extremely low, it was positioned as a pessimistic number. If the Himalayan ice caps melt, there's a couple of billion people living at the bottom that depended on the water. So a new study is found meat accounts for nearly 60% of all greenhouse gas gases from food production. So and that's a huge food production is a huge part of greenhouse gas, gas emission. So if every one of us could definitely try and get off red meat but reduce our meat as much as possible, it will make a huge difference. And surprisingly, people of color face a disproportionate amount of harm from climate change. The report already is us focused. But globally, of course, this is definitely the case. Those who did not cause this crisis will suffer its greatest impact. Animals are already transforming and changing. They're shaped to clap to cope with a warmer world their beaks are getting bigger there is a bigger. That's pretty interesting read. Only a few carbon projects meet the basic criteria for climate integrity, human rights and other things. There's a lot of greenwashing going on. And right now the giant secured Sequoia is an ISA trees in risk in California. There's one tree it's called the General Sherman tree. It's the largest known living single stem tree on earth and is estimated to be around 2300 to 2700 years old. So the fires are heading their way but they're wrapped in fire resistant elementium blankets right now. And you just got to hope they make it through they are resilient to fire the trees are resistant to fire sorry. So they're the biggest things going on in the climate not everything Of course. So every week the news is pretty big on the climate so let's say we wake up Hmm So here's here's a question for you. What if I don't change my red meat consumption? Because I love red meat? What if I don't change that? What if I I love flying just went on a cruise? I was just checking just them how how my maths How much does the Do I need to offset to keep my existing lifestyle and not change anything? You love your offsetting day? I love my offset. Well, here's the thing. I The reason why I push the offset button is is because I suspect that there's a bunch of bad people out there you go, you got to reduce your meat consumption and they're gonna go not so we need to give we need to give them a plan B or you know plan don't beat don't drive your car. That's the other one. So don't drive your car. Yeah, so well it goes it goes the people that are not going to change their ways and we're gonna give them well but we've got to give them well we were talking was saying a people in America people in England people in Russia people in China people in Australia, you change your ways. But what about all those people in South America and all those people in in Africa and all those people in other countries that aren't even listening to this? Not that there's other places are but but if those those places aren't listening to this then then you know they're not gonna they might not want to change their ways either. So so there's got to be a part two to it. It's got to be Yeah, if you can change your ways that's great. But then if you don't want to change your ways, you got to do something you can't just go No I don't believe in it. Because that saves me from changing my ways. It but what probably better is if I'm not going to change my way I just went on the cruise. Now I know Royal Caribbean have got a whole bunch of stuff about what they're doing to recycle to treat the food that comes the waste food and and how they they are trying to be more efficient as they can they're still burning the you know the fuel the power the boat about but but how they What are they doing? And then what can I do is somebody who chooses to go on a cruise or chooses to fly somewhere or chooses to drive my car or whatever, I don't have a car but if I had a car to choose to drive a car I'm very responsible responsibility. It is isn't it? But I have an electric bike I nope I've got a scooter that I've used my foot with style but that but I do have I do rent electric cars for occasionally which presumably a plugged into some petrol producing generate I don't know. Anyway, but the but but the the point I guess I'm trying to make is what is the plan B? If If because the studies showed that if we all eat less red meat or meat in general actually if we and if you had to choose a meat choose chicken because of its its thing is is less but it's unfair on the chickens I suppose. So there's so there's eat less red less meat. Don't drive as much as you can try not to fly if you can, if you are going to fly. Long Haul is better than a tiny short trip. Tiny short trips because it's takeoff and landing that that are are particularly intensive. If you can catch a train instead of one of those short trips. Are we better in all these sorts of ends, but the data goes down to only have one child so so I so I I was like, Well, some of you have got more than one child so I'm even I'm even good on that account. But some people I got well I'm not gonna I'm not gonna donate one of my children away. So what can I do to offset us? What can I do to offset that thing, and for the cruise apparently that was, and I'm happy to reference the, the site, they did all the calculations based on Royal Caribbean carnival. The Norwegian one apparently, when that site was doing the calculation didn't didn't share their carbon emissions. But I am, myself apparently managed to contribute to a meeting point eight, two tonnes for the cruise, which is quite a lot like a flight. I mean, mind you, I flew, I flew to Nigeria to do a speech and back and that was three tonnes for the flight. So there's a couple of days a couple of two different points here that need to sort of be in response to you. So there's an economic concept called D gross. I don't know if you've heard about it, it's not something I'm ready to talk about today, I was just reading a really good opinion piece in the in the New York Times on it just just this morning. And day growth is about that we, we we can't keep growing the way we're growing. Right? So that's, that's our KPI anymore. Yes, basically. Right. So we have to completely transform the entire global economic infrastructure. And it's with, you know, integrity across the board that the incomes will be earned by the educators. But it's not. Let's not talk about that now. Right. The other point, the plan is, we should, we should do that. We should talk about D growth as a concept and all do some research before we do it. But the other thing is, so in 2013, I think it was to 12 to 13k shadow banning who you guys know, said at the time, there were 500 middle class Asians now that by 2020, there'd be 1.7 5 billion, it was considered the greatest seismic shift in human history, that this amount of wealth increased, right. And so globally, there's, I don't know how many billions of middle class. So the crisis where pace faced in the last decade is is enormous rising wealth, right, right around the world. And when people rising wealth, they, they rise in expectations, they eat more meat, they travel more, they consume more, all that sort of stuff, right. So this is the crisis that we're facing, because it's just been people can't believe how quickly it's all happened. And the reason that's happened so quickly is because everything has changed so quickly, the world has lurched forward, developmentally, like so quickly. And so d growth also talks about how the wealthy in the world have to reduce their impact. But also, we need to leave space for the least wealthy amongst us to rise because they need to be able to harness more energy to have, you know, light so that the kids can be educated and all that sort of stuff. So we kind of got to do that a little bit. But you know, that all of it, we need to come down, they need to come up, but we need to come down enough. Where we contribute. Now we're always going to have people to go, I'm not going to eat, I'm not going to give up my red meat, that's fine. The thing that we don't have time for, you know, these sort of changes that we're talking about, I remember in the in the early, late 70s, early 80s, I remember saying My grandmother was recycling, and I was like, right, finally the message has gotten through, right. And it took a generation for people to sort of take onboard the message that how how we live needs to change this is obviously in Australia, we don't have the time for generation of change, right? So Well, the change that we need needs to be rapid. So we need to embrace whatever it is that we need to do, whether it's reducing our flying. But the other points are that are needed to make was with the emissions because I know you love your emissions. And right now it's good, that's a good thing to do. But the number of people that have risen and the, you know, like 50% growth in the next 20 years, the emissions sort of start to be counted out because there's just so much more that's happening. So we need we just need to we need to reduce it all right across the board. You know, because you know, when people think of meat or beef, you know, deforestation in the Amazon. It's for the meat that we eat, it's for burgers and McDonald's. It's all that sort of stuff. It's also for pet food. It's for luxury handbags, you know, it goes into a lot of different things. So we just need to reduce everywhere, you know, so don't buy that dog rescue the dog but don't don't bring more dogs into the world because we don't need to be feeding more dogs, you know, they like even even the pets. Our cultures around pets has changed dramatically around the world. And the pet food industry is is a multi multi billion industry that's like doubling every every decade, you know, so we've got to look at it all and just go we got to bring it all down. Okay, bring it all down. And I get and I appreciate that argument. The The reason why I like giving the offset argument is if people are offsetting at some point they're going to start looking at why are they offsetting What else could they do? But we've got to start somewhere brings awareness. Us Yeah, yeah. But at the other day, The other side, we need the big, big decision makers, which is not Joe but the big decision makers which is which? Because it looks like I'm pointing to Joe my screen anyway. Like with the government and and CEOs, everything else is that certainly not. And the the Yeah, so just kept me out at any point here is to is to give people somewhere to start like your grandmother was recycling, you know, that's great. That's how that's how and now Australia's like zero plastic bag sort of supermarkets, which is fantastic. So it's like, how do we do? How do we do more of that? And how do we get more of that at a government level? But in the meantime, what can every individual do easily? Yeah, we can, we always have to remember the one important thing, we can all do everything, every single one of us can do the right thing. But until the top 100 polluters changed the way they pollute, it doesn't matter what we do. So your responsibility always has to lie with the biggest polluters, and that's all part of their greenwashing to make us the ones feeling responsible, but we do have to stop, we have to reduce our impact, we have to reduce our energy consumption, especially the people who come from wealthy countries, but the top 100 the biggest polluters in the world, if they don't do it, they don't change anything. And then you know, you know, the amount of methane that's been like, leaked out of oil and gas fields through two, three holes that can be plugged up, you know, the waste, and, you know, fix just addressing the methane crisis around the world, which can be done, whether it's through our composting, but also through the methane that's been leaked in oil fields. It will give us another five years to deal with the climate crisis. So let's just do that. Right. Students money involved, but what about what are you saying from an aspect? And if these 100 polluters don't change, then what's the point in us doing our part? I was never, I was never really into I, I very much believe in the climate crisis. But I've got more of it after meeting you yonder. Yes, we've had a lot of debates before. But you know, when I look at and I look around, and watch people during the pod are just good. Hi, it's such a money driven industry, that's, that's preventing it, or COVID coming up, or people were worried about now than later on down the line, or getting older, you know, or are trying to extend our lives, I just look at it, you know, it's like raging against the machine type of thing. I know, the message is, if they don't change, then I'm asking what's the point in US changing? Human nature, human nature, that's what we're doing? Every every single one of them is that we've been brought up red meat, whether it's an issue, cars, anything, it's all human nature. So you're asking us to change human nature. But not unless these 100 people do what they're supposed to do? Yeah, no, it's it, we've got to look at it both angles, right? The main thing is, we don't blame ourselves. Because these businesses are the ones that actually really need to do it. But at the same time, we do need to change our behavior. You know, we live, the Western society that I grew up, it was we grew up without respect for Earth, there's a report that Americans the way they live, they need five Earths to maintain that, you know, like, that's where we're out of balance with nature. And we need to get back into balance with nature, one of the countries that's the most in balance with nature is Indonesia, because it's, you know, you see, its rivers, waterways and oceans that are just full of trash, but the way the people live, is no imbalance as much as it can be. But all of us need to, like when you when you look at, you know, when I when I went through the process of changing our family's way of living, and just looked at every part of our lives, and we haven't finished the job, it's actually quite a long term, you the way you wash your clothes, the way you eat, how you shop, where you shop, I'm taking containers, taking bags to the supermarket, like all of it, right? When you start to go through the process of cleaning your life out, you actually start to feel a bit horrified that you remember, in the, in the 90s, there was this lady, she used to wash her clean wrap, and we are all used to laugh at her that she would do such a thing you know, and now, you know, like clean wrap is it's like one of the worst plastics because it's almost impossible to recycle it, but it's everywhere. It's covering everything. And it's a it's a terrible, terrible thing, this, some of the some of the stories around the plastic pollution, you know, but we need to clean our lives up, you know, and we need to we need to, we need to be more respectful of the earth and, and it changes who you are. It actually makes you a kind of person that makes you much more aware. But if people just want to keep going and have blinkers on to the impact that their lifestyle has on the environment, um, if they're not going to change, I'm not here to convince them to change. I don't think a lot of them but I don't think a lot of them have blinkers on I think a lot of them as well. We say you're talking with Trump. Supporting travel, loving travel for work. So everything getting in the way of this is purely money driven and human nature survival moving forward from that. So I mean, it's funny what you said, but cleaning out your lives actually tried going vegan for three days. And then three days later, I had some chicken and I just felt it just felt dirty to me. I thought, oh, maybe the vegans are on to something here. And then I went to Jamaica, and they had a lot of jerk chicken, it was so good. I sort of put me back on the wrong path. But, uh, but that's what I thought that, you know, when you're saying clean out your live and doing your part. I mean, another thing is, okay, then we got to teach the kids but then you're saying, well, the there are students by by the next how many years anyway? So it's like, oh, what's the point then, or whatever the deal is, you know, there's got to be a stronger message on climate change of, you know, motivate people to do it, rather than just talking about Doomsday all the time. And I absolutely but but I do think people need to be aware of what's at risk and do it in another way. Even when even when I read BBC, it's all this is this. This is soul, Doomsday Doomsday, and this is coming. And this is coming. And I, I get the fact is coming, and I want to do something about it. But if you say there's nothing, no, we can do it that way, then I'm just like, Okay, then it is what it is gonna be turn off my TV, and just just take my kids to school. But yeah, but that's why I'm trying to do the offsetting. I think the answer is a hybrid approach. I think the answer is got to be, you know, hey, if we, if we, I mean, and Andrew, you know, that I mean, my stuff is about planting mango trees or fruit trees in Africa somewhere. And I know where it's just at this, this particular orphan trust. So, you know, it's 40 cents us to plant a fruit tree to offset that cruise, for example, which is what 80.82 times it says one time, one time, I need to plant 18 trees to offset that 1818 times 40 cents, means whatever that is, what you're doing, I agree with you, that's a massive marketing tool, like lifestyle, all these things they put in the magazines of how you should be or whatever, that there would be an actual functional idea of you know, what, it's all over the place has been marketed properly, because it all is an engine. And I'd like oh, maybe maybe I'll do that there. Maybe I'll leave a card home today and a walk down here. So I can go away on my flag later on. And, you know, that's, that's a very good that that is the marketing thing, or that we need to be marketing. You know, I think I think like I said, just what you still offset of saying to people, hey, instead of, I want to go on a cruise, so I'm not going to do this for the next three weeks, I'm done. That's great. And market that and put it in the news, and hey, let's do this as a thing, and generate it and maybe make it go viral, or whatever the deal is. And people actually start doing it the way they treat themselves because they put so much work into themselves. Because it's marketed. It's marketed so well. So if you do it that way, this is the offset that for me, instead of the earth doomed or we're not doing this, that was something that I'd say all right. Let me try and do this. And I'm work my work my way up to that. Tim and do a mark connecting thing, right? Because I think the idea about, about how it's it's a it's against human nature, I think what happens in the world is that where because of the industrial process because of commercialization, we are separated from what the impact of our actions is by enough steps so that we we we don't have to confront what we're actually doing. Because I think I think human nature is such that if everyone had to kill their own chicken to eat it, we would have less people eating chickens. Yeah, the way it works. So if you if you ask someone to go like, Okay, well, what I want you to do right now is if the money is the problem, like Well, I'm gonna pay you money right now to go outside your house, your house and just burn a bunch of stuff. So we can destroy or release carbon into the, into the atmosphere. If I were to say that you have to do that right now, you go outside your house, and you do that, you probably wouldn't do that. But because of the process that that separates you from the action that you're doing and the actual impact of you're doing. You can find some sort of rationalization is what they do in in warfare. Why why people in tanks can be shot at whereas it's very hard to shoot a person in face to face. So the mark connecting idea is really the start making that impact more real. I think there's a bunch of people that this audience here is is the audience that I mean, this group here, the four of us, you've got those higher level thinking, You you you do things and even then there is there's a bit of Balancing involved, but I think the larger audience really has to begin to understand that I was thinking about how Actually, it's an economics principle, if there's a way to price everything, so the offsets have a way to, there is a way to price it. But if there was a real price, the bay some sort of thing that they, they, in terms of making those choices that are, that are that are less environmentally friendly. For instance, if they really was a price to pay, people understood that, that would make a difference. If we can shorten the distance between action and the impact of your action as well, for people, that would be good. So you know, I, I frequently come back to this, it's up to I feel, it's always up to the artists, artists need to figure out a way to help that connection happen. So people can can begin to feel it and get a better sense of it. So that when you do you know, when you when you when you when you imagine that if you could figure away for someone to experience having a stake, leading to some other part of the world, being being destroyed all at once, as an idea, that would be something that would be a bit more visceral, people could then decide if they really want to be an asshole. And if they really, really need to have that steak, but they would do it knowing that that was the impact of what they were doing. All right, and also a lot of us ignorance, you know, like, so, if you actually did put it out there and put that message out there. And people are actually ignorant to it before, because they're too busy with their lives. They don't really talk while they're looking at it more than that would be, that would be a way for it. I gotta admit, I was ignorant for many, many years, you know, until I met certain people that you know, you sit down, you listen to them. So I mean, you know, everything needs marketed. The world we live in. Yeah. And that's Yeah. So the big point here is right there. So the doom and gloom message, right? So we saw today, we're on track for a four degree world based on what countries are doing at the moment, a four degree world is a disaster. We need to all come together and go, Okay, this is happening, right? What are we going to do about it, and then we need everybody on board. And we're never going to get 80% of the global population. If we can get China in India to go, right, we're going to shut down these coal fields, we're going to, we're going to look at, you know, bring bamboo in hemp, and we're going to, we're going to change the way we do this, if we can all come together and drastically change the way we do this. It isn't all doom and gloom, it's a huge thing that we have to change. And so the message is always, let's understand how big this fight is. Let's understand what's at cost, or what's at stake. And then let's go and do everything we can to do it. And we all need to do it together. And that's why global Unity has never been more important. Every single person in every single country, on this on this on this world needs to get involved. And what I'm saying is massive. But it's the only thing that's going to change the path. So, you know, that's, that's what I that's the message I'm just trying to get. It's not about emissions. And I think it's brilliant. It's a very, it's a very, it's a very big message. You know, it's like, let's go let's go do the big fight. Well, let's, why wait, why just give people a little fight, we can win? Yeah, no swimming. to the office? Is everyone the individual messages, change your lifestyle to be in alignment with Earth? However you can. But let's get to the China lifestyle first, and then said, the reason we're doing this is this now, but right now, what you're saying is, okay, as soon as you meet me in an hour, if you don't do this, I'm going to break your legs. That's, that's really cool. Let me go smaller, give people a fight, they can win every day. And then everyone will start jumping on board with the offsetting principle. Rather than that, rather than make you say, yes, the message is so big, but it might be so big that people can't, it's might be too big for some people on their little minds, individually, live in balance with Earth, governments, business leaders, heads of the United Nations, they need to come together and sort out the big stuff, with individually aim to live in balance with Earth, communicate with your community, show, show, by example, share information. And if enough of us do this, if enough of us share this message, we have a chance. If we don't do it, we don't have a chance. And that's where the gloom and doom is because no one believes that we've got the will and the power to do it. I believe that we've got the will and the power to do it. We just need to recruit enough people to believe that so you know, I don't believe in the power to do it. Well, I think that's good, though, Andrea, that that you believe we've got the wall in the power to do it. I just and I think even if the glove doesn't have the will and power to do But it shouldn't stop us sharing the message to say this is what we should do. But I also agree with Chris, about the small wins, I think once. So here's what happened in Australian politics. reasonably recently, the greens know, the, I think was one of the part one of the big parties, the big two parties said, Okay, we'll have this sort of watered down version of the Environmental Protection thing. This is the dumbest report of what actually happened. But, but one of the big parties said, Okay, we'll accept this version of it. And the greens went, No, you have to you have to agree to the, the, the this version of it, not this version of it. So it wasn't agreed to. And so nothing changed. Whereas had the greens gone. Okay, good. agree to this small version of it, I'll take it, I'll take what you're agreeing to. But I want to build on it later. Because then that becomes the foundation to build the next level. If you go, but we need 27 levels. And the truth is, time is running out, we're going to need the panacea, right? We're gonna need this magic pill. That magic pill, in my opinion comes from big corporate, and, and government, like United Nations this sort of stuff that level. And I feel I can't do anything. At that level. I apart from cast my vote. I personally, I feel like all right to a letter. That's the only other thing I can do. I can write a letter to, to whoever I mean, yes. school girl can sit outside of school. And that can make a big difference. But there's a lot of school girls that didn't you know, that's not happening for. So that's been great. What the What was that? Chris? said, Are you going to write the letter on paper? Yeah, yeah. Well, actually, actually, it would be good to write the letter on a piece of paper. We're coming up to running out of time. We will continue having this conversation. But I think the most important thing is individual changes matter. And they ripple out and have an effect. So don't think that by doing something, it doesn't matter, that we aren't making a change we are and I think that's one of the biggest struggles is people don't think what they're doing matters. Because the big things aren't happening. Well, we, we have to keep pushing for the big things to happen. And they happen when the individual people care enough that they force them to happen through their votes or their letters, you know, through the pressure, so we through protesting, I mean, there's a lot of different things. Other news that's been capturing your attention this week, maybe just a couple. Anyone so funny. Just before I go to that, that the I there was an article I read about the Ponzi scheme sold to the American public the Afghan Ponzi scheme. It was quite an entertaining read, although it didn't really say who was the major beneficiary of it necessarily, but but it was, it was, it was said when it when a scam falls apart, it collapses fast, and they likened Afghanistan to a Ponzi scheme. And the particular bit I quite liked I was just going to read this bit to you. This was in foreign policy calm. investors were then told fantastical things by the Bush administration about how to devise an entirely new approach to a terrible score, and how it would eliminate evil. The promises were framed in terms of American exceptionalism, the mystique of special operations, the uncanny accuracy of armed drones and the mysteries of counterinsurgency warfare decoded and applied by uniformed wizards. Everyone charges into war, and others come to pay for it while America then you know, withdraws their peace of the championship is just relating to that I watched what happened on after 20 years what happened on September 11, on my box, which was basically a minute by minute capture of people story is one of the best documentaries ever seen. And then I went on to watch turning point which was the 911 turning point on Netflix. Just the amount that you weren't aware of like I lived in Jamaica for eight years so when Obama got in everyone was just prove Obama and it was just unbelievable and but when I give you the lowdown on Afghanistan, how Russia were in their first tie, then Obama decided to pull out troops after what boosted and then just all the drone attacks and how many there was and how much collateral damage there was. And now with the pull the note of Afghanistan now and how much that'll open us up again to all these terrorist attacks considering that the collateral damage affected families have the side of the Jordan attalla banner or do it that way. So again, it's it's it's it seems that a lot of circles going on Where you got to stay in there if you don't. And there's more terrorist attacks coming? I don't mean to leave on a doom and gloom message. But that's what I was watching. Yeah, very good. Anything else catching your attention? Oh, you've gone you've lost your voice. There we can eat a Joe lavota has gone. Yeah. Now being censored. No, I hire eight seasons of of homeland and being last week as we as we were halfway through it how how remarkably well time that seems to be watching it right now as Afghanistan is happening. And it's just crazy. It it's, it's almost to the point. It's a docu drama of what was happening, or at least at least up to season seven or there abouts. Yeah, I've got a bit much Stan, you had a you had in season four and five when they went into Germany and the actual fold that they actually fold the politics that was going on at the time. And yeah, I was really I love that. Yeah. So that's an interesting tension, Bobby. But what what what really got me this week was actually as I was preparing for some a webinar, for for healthy longevity. I watched an interview a podcast from my MBA bialik. She had david Sinclair on David Sinclair is a professor of genetics at Harvard Business, Harvard Medical School. And his book is about why we age and why we don't have to, and I was struck by how how emotional it made my amend and, and I thought, by extension, the number of other people as well, who would be affected by this, the whole prospect of longevity, for instance, and how there is a sense that the world is is set up to benefit the wealthy. The idea that if we do things with longevity, we do things with, with all these advances, that the automatic assumption is going to be that it's going to be the wealthy who will benefit from these things. And to some extent, you're going to have things like that. And Jeff Bezos is just doing this huge thing where he's working on that he's working on the aging problem as well. And he's hired that basically as many of the big guns as you can find, and thrown a lot of money at the problem. But what was interesting, is living longer and healthier lives. The problem is aging we're trying to defeat we're trying to defeat aging. And so if all four people like focused on the right things that we continue, isn't it? I beg your pardon? Is this is really affecting, you know, just as in as in like, so. So what what I think is the assumption of what I was getting to was the assumption that it's that it doesn't come from a Neverland place. And I think about someone like David Sinclair is that what he's trying to do is to democratize that he's trying to take big solutions that would normally be reserved for the very wealthy, well connected, and saying, look, this is for everybody, we can we can make it so that something like longevity can be for everyone. So I think there is we have to have faith in the benevolence of smart, wealthy individuals who can see there that we can do more for more people at the same time, and have some faith in that as well. It's not it's not just going to be that I've had this discussion with my daughter, who was she she really has a problem with billionaires because she keeps thinking that you can't become a billionaire. Unless you prepare to screw over enough people. It's part of that, that calculus she does and and i and i think that i hope that there enough wealthy, powerful people in the world who have good intentions, who will do something good with that. And so that was that was just my thought I was just I was just struck by how level thinking well, thinking people can also still be very suspicious about the intent, even if it is something which seems to be beneficial to the rest of us. I mean, you know, that's that that was a concern. Sorry, I was gonna say I did read about a Swedish billionaire who bought 18 million hectares of Amazon Rainforest from a logging company to preserve it. There's plenty of examples that the founders have of HubSpot. They're all become billionaires and all their money is going towards philanthropic activities, and then the two co CEOs and founders of Canva, which is the largest democracy, the most wealthy software company, private software company in the world, all their money is going towards good. So you know, there's a lot of really good examples of very, very wealthy people doing good stuff. Another one another piece of news. I'm not I'm surprised I'm amazed that none of you guys brought it up is obviously orcas. You know what orcas is a UK, US, Australia, UK and Australia, us on the UK. Yeah, have announced a military partnership, right, which is all about building nuclear submarines out of Australia. Of course, Joe, Joe Biden forgot sky Moe's name called him the fella from down under which he's got some attention. But China is obviously annoyed by these packets, potentially looking at a declaration of war, which is exactly what we don't need right now. And the French are equally pissed off, because it was a multi billion dollar contract with with them to build the submarines, and they're a few years behind, and all that sort of stuff. But the backlash is started. So keep your eyes open for that. That's the big news today. But we are gone long, I thought we'd go short this week. And the theme of the week was global unity. And I think we've been speaking about it in lots and lots and lots of different ways. You know, when we look at the the challenges that we're ever trying to overcome, so COVID is obviously the big one that is impacting us right now. And then the climate crisis, and the only way we've got any chance of, of dealing with any of it is through global unity. But with the division so deep, not just not just, you know, cross border, but within our own countries, how do we, how do we even stand a chance of getting there? So we talked about consensus a couple of weeks ago, about how do we do it? You know, Chris, have you got any thoughts? You know, how do we start building towards global unity? So, you know, it's those American movies where we got the Martians, we all come together to fight them. That's basically what we need right now. What do you think? I think I think, you know, global unity. And you know, I think obviously, social media has done that well with race and you know, unsexy, holding people accountable. But at the end of the day, and don't let me get biblical on you. We're all flawed human beings. And that's always going to continue. It's no no more evident today than the backers and backers, it's going to, I don't think I don't want to keep throwing over a message like this. But, you know, like I said, America has just come out of another war. And, and it looks second, there's another one going on, which is a lot of money generated. So, I mean, all you can do in your little realm is hold people responsible for for their actions and bring awareness to their actions. But as far as, as far as unity. Yeah. That's it. I bet you guys 136 trees to offset the travel on the cruise. Thinking unity. Well, what it's done is it's helped the, what is it called the mango tree orphan trust in Kenya, plot the the fruit trees, which also give the local population, fruit as income and food helps house the orphans and helps request the carbon out of the atmosphere if it doesn't all burn down. And because it's a fruit tree, people will probably keep the tree going rather than chop it down for firewood and call, which is the other thing that can happen to the trees. But anyway, that's just one thing I'm doing to make sure that I did something with it was the question. It was the question what I'm doing or is the question Hi, Canada. How can we Yeah, yeah, I think Jim Jim just added a random thing based on the earlier conversations. So he wasn't good. Yeah, well, yeah. What can we do? We can do small we can do a small bit daily, and be more aware of our impact. And by unity, I wasn't talking about unity. Right? We're talking about unity. Tim, come back to the conversation. Goodness, can we just get something out of sitting? In the offseason, I got a lot from this. th sorry. We we need the we need to we need to have the consensus on the common enemy. And I think that's really how we can we can do it. And then somebody has to rally enough of the troops together to do to make it something we can all understand. At the same time. I think if we all really accept that there is a common enemy if we knew for instance, and I mean, you know, Hollywood's always doing this every 50. That's what he is for the world itself is going to be destroyed by a external external force. That really does create unity and the unity is not unity does not have to come in the form of a complete consensus. Like for instance, you know, if we're being invaded by Marshall We don't all have to agree that we will fight them the same way. We just have to agree that we will fight them. You know, and I think that's how you can you can you could do that. I don't know if the world's better now because of social media because right now we're having these little little little little fights over little little things and little perspectives and say that we are people who are allegedly on the same side, having great arguments about the nitty gritty of how you supposed to do things. You have environmentalist fighting with environmentalists, you have capitalists fighting the capitalists, you have so many different things. So surely, social media shines a light on everything more than it's ever did before. So, you know, whether people were, you know, if it's slightly in the wrong that's going to be brought up. So the fact that they're fighting or debating whatever the deal is, I just, I don't agree. I just think social media and I compared to I will get even back in the UK really suffered badly in Germany from football hooliganism. Yeah, and now there's social media everywhere, CCTV everywhere, and you don't see much of it anymore, or anything that you hear about it. So I wouldn't, I wouldn't. Sorry to disagree. But I'm just saying social media that way. I think it really, it really does help hold people's feet to the fire, if they're if they're doing something. I think the major the major stop of hooliganism for the last couple of years has been something that started with COVID. You know, I think if you if you allow that it was so called back to normal, we have the regular flow, it would, it would have been happening. I mean, social media isn't new. It does. It does it. I'm not saying it's without its advantages, but I'm saying that what happens is unity actually has been broken down because of social media, because social because in social media, and the controls you have and what you get the other ring of people, you know that there is there is like you don't want canceled culture, you talk about different things like that people behave on social media in a way that you allow yourself to become it go into smaller, even smaller tribes. So it feels like you're unified in the smaller tribe, because you've got this group of people that come your echo chambers. But really, in terms of a view of the wall, I think the view of the wall has become too diverse for it to come together. And in what do you have to do you have less benevolent actors who know and look at this opportunity and go like, ah, therefore I can exploit this and do something with that. I don't have a solution. But I I recognize, I think that's the problem. We're more fractured now than ever before. And within those fractures, everyone feels that they are a kind of majority. So that the social media conversation, obviously, you won't be surprised, I find really fascinating, right? Because social media gets blamed for everything these days, right? So you were talking about a common enemy before Joe, we do have a common enemy, it's called a virus, we just can't see it. We can't you know, we can't unify around fighting that right. And that's been a big part of why it's become such a big global problem. Social media gets blamed for everything that ails our societies today. But the misinformation, the info demmick that's going on around the virus. It's happened before we had social media, the divides that happened in the world have happened before we had social media, you know, the build up to World War One, the build up from World War Two, probably every world that's ever happened before and after, and the breakdown that happens in societies that lead to that extreme levels of violence. The reality is, we need to step out, we need to we need to evolve as human beings, we need to operate at a higher level, we need to expect more from each other. I mean, one of my tips is, if you're opposed to somebody, if somebody is in complete opposition to you, take a step towards them and ask them to take a step towards you. If everyone took a step towards each other, we're going to reduce the gap that exists between us rather than staying over everyone in their own, you know, putting their jigs up, it's not helping. So take a step towards the people that you're against. Learn about communication, and persuasion skills, learn how to learn the science of it. There's plenty of information out there, podcasts, YouTube videos, learn how to have conversations with people where you actually get can talk to someone who is in opposition to you, but where you can actually hear each other and hear each other's points, and maybe even have a positive influence on each other. It doesn't mean you're going to change them, and you shouldn't go into the position of trying to the other thing is the patch, the aggressive in the patronizing comments, you know, people pontificating, like they've got all the answers. None of us have got all the answers. So we've all got to keep our cool. It's challenging, none of us are perfect. We're all making mistakes. But, you know, but I think we've all got to work harder to want to heal the divisions, because by allowing ourselves to be divided, there are powers at play here. We're just playing into that. And we need to come together. Because without the unity that we need, we're not going to be able to overcome the crisis we face. And it's on all of us. And I say, my, my expectation, I expect better of everyone on this planet. And, and I will continue to expect more. I'm not I'm not thinking backwards. I've got we've got to start thinking forward. So that's kind of the way I think anyone that's trying to divide you, whether it's the media, government, business, anyone, anyone that's putting you against somebody else, anyone that says someone's your enemy, that isn't necessarily your enemy personally. Pay attention to that. Pay attention to the divide the agenda there, what's their agenda? It's always an agenda, right? Yeah, I was I was, you know, I had that conversation. So So again, producing these webinars. What I love is actually the serious scientists, when they get together, because what they do is they get together, and they disagree. And they do it with the higher purpose in mind, which is to have better science. Yeah, right. Yeah, let's do that. Right. You don't have to fight with someone because they disagree with you. I actually find it fascinating when people disagree with me, because I'm really listening to what they're saying. And I'm trying to understand where it comes from. And I want to know, where they found that perspective and why they came to that conclusion. And I listened to the words that people use, like old track conversations on Twitter and the words people use Why do you use that word? Like you said, the word woke? It's such a patronizing word. You know, someone if someone puts work at me, I'm like, I'll go away. You're not having a conversation here. You just being an asshole, right? Like, you have a conversation with me. I'm happy to have a conversation. But that that, you know, using those insults towards each other, right? Yeah, you're just right wing or you're, you know, vaccines anti Vax all of it. Why, why? Why do you think what you think helped me understand it, so that I can understand it? I think when you're having a debate you both you both leave, even if you violently disagree with other person, you still leave with food for thought. Yeah. And you leave with something maybe in the back of your mind of omit maybe. Okay, let me you can do a stand instead of just not being so oblivious to think that's a big thing to staying open, right? Yeah. Cool. All right. So Chris, you've been watching. What was it? I watched it last week. The turning point likes turning point. That's your recommendation for some light. light hearted destruction. Yeah. No, it was the one before September. What happened on September 11. That was a better one. But uh, yeah. Oh, you want to? We do we do a you know, what are you watching to sort of take your mind off life the universe and everything. You know, what's what's your escape? Yeah. My escape. As price surprise, I go to the gym. But I mean, what I'm watching. Yeah. Watching, reading, listening to I just came out of the room there from reading this is gonna sound so typical and stereotypical. I just watched your model man on fire with Denzel Washington. But yeah, but uh, I watched what was it? Which I was very surprised that considering I, you know, if anyone thinks I'm a mommy, man, my wife got me into watching working working women on Netflix. Oh, I'm leaving. I'm just kidding. Yeah. So I thought I should we're not watching this. We're not watching us. She ended up working late at night. And I ended up binge watching a whole five seasons. It was really really good. Yeah, really well, working women. And funny. It's very funny, too. Yeah. So Craig, Chris proves you can you can be you can be you can have big guns. Here. I'm gonna come on, give us a pump. And yeah, there we go. big guns and B and Bs often, gentlemen, is a camera big enough guys. Get over it. You got a white screen there. So Joe, obviously, you're What was it? What was it? You've finished it? I finished homeland. But I want to recommend this little podcast, I guess you as well. It's called the happiness lab by Pushkin. And Laura Santos is a psychologist. And this particular last episode was about you can't always want what you like. And it was about how it's about how as as animals, we are very much driven to the easy sort of pleasures in life the things like having a an ice cream or cookie or whatever it is. And that kind of thing is very easy to sort of do. But there is a higher level of pleasure that we derive from doing the hard things right. So and this is pure rumor, but I hear that after a great gym workout, you can feel extra good about yourself now. Surely not everybody. I should I should let you see the rest of the season. Surely not everybody was kung fu fighting? I don't think. So. You do have good t shirts. Yeah. So the the the the idea is, how do we train ourselves? How do we move ourselves? Should we allow ourselves to connect ourselves to the work that needs to be done this I'm talking to myself here, as I preach right? about doing the work that needs to be done that will bring you those higher levels of pleasure, because the way our minds are designed, we're not designed to sense long term pleasure and really pursue it and really wanted. That's, that's a kind of a higher function. The Metro function is the one that finds you in the middle of the night and the fridge having a snack, or maybe two or maybe five, you know, so a very interesting idea, which I've been trying to digest. Like I've listened to this podcast three times. Now I'm still trying to what is it? It wasn't what is it again, it sounds it sounds cool. It's called the the happiness lab. And this is the latest episode, which is basically about about the way our minds are connected to the things we enjoy. Nice. Tim? Well, because I was on the cruise ship, I've kind of missed a lot of stuff. So I've got some catch up to do on only murders in the building, which I talked about last time, which I thought I got onto What is this one? It's called earn only murders in the building on Netflix, I think, or Disney? What is it? It's it talks about Martin Martin and Martin Short living in an apartment and one of the people who was murdered in the apartment and they're like, amateur detective, you know, the listen to podcasts. And so they sort of meet, they didn't know anybody in the building, and then they meet and try to work it out. They're trying to work it out. But it's very funny, huh? Yeah. If you like podcasts with that, explore the mind. One of my favorite podcasts these days is you're not so smart. And it really, really, really brilliant. Have you ever listened to that, jack? Well, you passed me that one on COVID. I found that Yeah, you just check in every now and again, if you've got some time. Really, really good. But I watched a doc doc on Netflix called take your medicine this week? Have you guys seen that idea? Basically, it's I mean, you know, like we you know, when you've got teenage kids, you know, smoking vaping and drinking and pot smoking are the sort of the concerns, you know that the influence is there in their lives, but take your medicine is, is this whole new sort of age group of drug abuse, it's quite frightening. And it's over the counter stuff. And it's basically missed in pill form. And these kids addicted to it in all of the American universities, and they think they perform higher athletes as well. And the reality is, it doesn't actually make any difference. It just does in their mind. So it's like a whole new level of concern for as a parent that you got to keep keep an eye on your kids and what they're taking. But take your medicine have a look at it. It's um, yeah. Interesting. So just to show you just a quick plug a friend of mine, when you're talking podcast, Kyle Daniels, he has a podcast called coach success. I've just finished coaching some kids as you know, army between 10 and 16. And he brings on all professional sports people and speaks on the mentality of sports before going into the arena, leaving the arena and all this since a really good Listen, everyone he brings on is he's a he's a mind coach. It's quite an is very, very good as well, I think for kids and, you know, they give them experience and what they should expect moving in home again. It's called coach success. Okay, what is that? Kyle Daniels? He says Obregon. He used to be a teacher here and to junket. And now he's been doing this. And I did one forum called let fear keep you sharp. But I've also had a mike Swan who's the head coach of tennis, Alberta, Tanya pure. And Mike Mike's really switched on gets everyone motivated. And he's played to a very high level. And it's just really to let kids listen to this stuff to show what's expected down the line or what can be expected. dynalite that's pretty good stuff. Yeah. Sounds awesome. I think I might be able to that. Alright. Dune movie, by the way. We've gone longer than we've ever gone. I wasn't expecting that. But, Chris, thank you so much for joining us. I hope you enjoyed it. Thank you so much. It's been awesome to have you here. Yeah. JOHN, Tim, as always. I hope everyone's enjoying the pen trick podcast. The tantric Yes. Yeah. Yeah. tied up with that one. All right. I'm gonna upload this onto my my podcast called uncommon courage, which I do every week. So if you prefer to listen to this as an audio it can. It's there within within a few hours. But yeah, thanks for thanks for coming along. Thanks for listening. We've gone a bit longer but we figure you know, this is sort of thing you can put into Background and listening to the bits that really capture your attention. We've tried to make it shorter, it's never succeeded. But you know, there's, there's a lot going on in the world. And it's important that we paying attention to what's going on in the world. So, thanks for joining us, and we'll see you soon. Yeah, say goodbye. Bye bye terol Hey, Thanks, Chris. Make sure you connect with Chris if you want more of that stuff of that mindset. That's that sounds really interesting. Yeah. Are we still live? Yeah. And ending the broadcast now. Okay. Okay.